Private Trucking School Or Company Training

Topic 13546 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
I Hustle''s Comment
member avatar

Yes sir, exactly as Anchorman said, I'd give them a call first.

Pretty Boy's Comment
member avatar

Anchorman,yes It is a 160hr minimum course and is highly regarded by the BBB. It also has many former students with very favorable reviews of the trainers (former truck drivers with a minimum of 20yrs experience each),as well as how professional the school is run. Primarily,I can obtain my permit as well as obtain my CDL'S in my home state without the worry of changing my license back after obtaining them in another state.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

I just want to add a disclaimer that Company-Sponsored Training Programs are also a great way to obtain your CDL. It really depends on your personal and/or financial situation. It is just like choosing a company, you have to figure out what works out best for you. We can give you endless advice but the final decision should be made independently. There will be others who can chime in with their company training experience to give you a better idea of that route.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

I personally went to a private school (I didn't pay for it but got a state grant) and would recommend it to anyone. The two things that sold me were 1. I was able to somewhat set my own pace for training. I had a test date scheduled but went to the instructors and said I don't feel ready to test. They immediately rescheduled my test for s week later and focused on where I felt like I was lacking. 2. Because I chose a private school, I was able to pick the company that I wanted to work for. I had 6 pre hires and was able to choose which company was going to work best for me and my life without having to worry about being in a contract.

Given, this is just my opinion and I'm sure that there are plenty out there who have had great experiences with company training. Hope this helps!

Chickiemonster- I have sent you a PM.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Pretty Boy, I went through Swift's school. Here are my thoughts.

At your first step you have your own choice of company. (Don't consider any kind of school yet.) We have resources here, like

If you are considering Company-Sponsored Training Programs, this is where you add it into the mix.

See? Even with Company schools you still have a wide choice in where to go.

For me, two features are benefits for company schools:

  • You are as good as hired if you are accepted at a company school.
  • A company school has access to training equipment most private schools can't touch.

  • There is a bit of pressure to get a move on, to complete the course and get your CDL.

In your posts, I get the impression you are worried about training for several months. Not so. School covers the 160 hours needed for the CDL ticket. With that you get hired, regardless if which type of school you go to - this is where the paths join - you get on with a road trainer, and, yes! start getting paid.

Road training can last from 4-6 weeks to over three months depending on how the company sets of up. After all this is when you get promoted to First Seat and can start driving solo OTR.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pretty Boy's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol V.,and yes I have looked into this site thoroughly to help guide my decision. I guess my issue/situation is the anxiety of starting a somewhat new career,and going into the unknown. I have gained extensive knowledge and insight from here and other avenues of research,but I'm just concerned with making an initial investment and having to sit/wait to become employed straight out of private school. I know a few guys who went through CDL school all to sit at home because of having no experience,and having to work at Waste Management just to make ends meet! I am on the fence about it daily,and I have been selected by Driver Solutions/PAM Transport to start on April 25. I truly am excited,and do well as nervous about which decision to choose,and I just don't wanna waste $4,000 when I can save it while choosing Company Sponsored Training. Yes,if I go to a Private school,I will 99.9999% most likely have to start in a Company which has a training school attached (Swift,Prime,etc)just to get those 2yrs(minimum)experience. I know the first few years are detrimental in trucking,yet I want to make the most "LOGICAL" decision without wasting effort,time and money. Also,I AM concerned with the training that either Private School,and Company's may offer and I just want to make sure all of my bases are somewhat covered before making a commonly made mistake without consulting those who have been in the business. Thanks for your Input Error V. And I shall continue to research through this and other avenues to help finalize my decision.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Pretty Boy's Comment
member avatar

Oh yeah,by the way Errol V,I did have a few email conversations with a recruiter from Swift. Through my busy schedule (I drive a 20ft box truck on the Jersey Shore delivering crash parts to bodyshops) I missed a few contacts via email.(2days to be exact) So when I went to reply,I had found that the guy (Tony Martinez) had closed my file,but told me that if any other Swift recruiters called/contacted me,to disregard them. I called 10 times,left message after message with no reply. Then,just yesterday I find an email sent Friday that Swift isn't hiring any student drivers in my area...??? I was about to give up on Swift,but then thought about reapplying to a different recruiter.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Here are four points for you, P.B.

1. Go to the head of the class for investigating your future. There are many posts on here where a new student makes a wrong choice, is out on the street and shrugs shoulders with an "Oh well!"

2. I can't speak for Swift's hiring conditions, but your best plan of action is to let the company say "No", don't you give up and do it for them.

3. Many non-school Trucking companies will cover your tuition after the fact. Never hurts to ask. See #2 above. Look for the term Recent Grads.

4. Here's a Hail Mary for you: an independent recruiter. One got hold of me after I used the convenient Apply For Truck Driving Jobs link. An independent recruiter works for you, because he doesn't get paid till you get placed. (Guess who signs company recruiter's paychecks!)

PM me and I'll send you the contact for the independent recruiter that helped me get into Swift.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More