The Things The New Drivers Will Never Know They Have Missed

Topic 1395 | Page 2

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James P.'s Comment
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Starcar, don't take this the wrong way... But I kinda don't believe you haha. Seeing as how drivers are I just cannot fathom them doing those things that you mentioned. I know what you're saying is true, it's just difficult to picture it. The best a driver does for another driver right now is hold the door for them at the truck stops.

I guess that's just how much if a big difference it was. But I simply cannot imagine truckers being that nice. I suppose that says a lot about how everything is these days.

Daniel, let me tell ya, Starcar is telling the truth.. I come from a trucking background..my father, my brother, 3 cousins, 3 uncles and myself have all driven truck..( mine was all offroad until recently ).. anyway, I can remember riding with my dad when I was a youngster (back in the 70's & early 80's) and have seen truckers stopped many many times beside the road just to help a fellow trucker out.. maybe they were changing a tire, or one had forgotten to fuel up and was bumming a few gallons of fuel to get to the next stop.. there was always fellowship and comraderie.. none of this " pee on you " attitude or all the ranting raving cussing crap that you hear on the cb radio nowdays... at least, it was this way in my area ( eastern ky ).. Starcar is 100% right on

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mistelle's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Now just a minute here... I'm brand new (two weeks on the road with my trainer, that new) and yes there are some things I will never know but there is still chivalry.

Here are a few examples that I have already experienced:

Tight getting into a fuel lane, while I was getting myself all the way in, I was going to rear end the guy in front of me (my front mirror) so I stopped. The guy behind me, drove right up under my bumper almost and was giving me go to hell looks. The guy in the front, stopped washing his windows, pulled his truck up enough so I could swing myself into my spot. Not only that but he also helped me with that ladder that is supposed to roll but the wheels were broken. Yes I know it was a noob mistake, but he helped me out without me even asking.

My first paycheck was chump change. I was sitting there figuring out how to buy my lunch with the little bit I had and while I was counting the pennies a guy walked up and paid for my lunch. I never even got to thank him.

Right before my husband and I were split up for our training (which being without him has been the hardest part of all this) we were figuring out our lunches and this guy sat himself down and bought us lunch and told us stories of the road. He said when he was starting someone helped him out and it was good to get to do the same.

My trainers truck broke down so we were at the terminal , stuck. I found out that my husbands truck had a flat a few miles away. One of the guys over heard me talking about it and offered to take me to go see him. Not only that but he showed us around Carlisle, PA. That night was a wonderful night, made a new friend and got to spend a few VERY precious moments with my husband.

I have had people stop and help me while I was trying to figure out how something worked (comdata, best cheap places to eat, how to work the blasted showers, the pumps (that there are two tanks, lol)).

There has been so much kindness out here that I can see why you would miss the old days. The stuff I have heard from the veterans in the truck stops sounds like so much fun. But I am still having fun, meeting insanely kind people, and learning new stuff. I may not know what a convoy was like, but I do know that there is a kindness amongst truck drivers that I haven't seen in any other profession that I have had. Most of the truckers out there are really decent people (even the one that was kind of creepy, said I reminded him of his deceased wife) who will give you the shirt off their back if you needed it more than them.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

StarCar you are so very right. They are missing a great deal. It's sad to know that what has changed our world/nation filtered over into the trucking industry. I remember all those things and wish they had not diapered into the ditch.

I was talking about that very thing this week. Wondering what happened to the steering wheel wave. I remember when each time you passed another driver you threw up you hand and waved. Nodded too! It was respect that was shown to each other. We knew what we were out here doing, keeping this country going. Making sure that people ate, had cloths on their backs, gas in their cars and the medicine needed to heal those pains.

Yes, a driver would stop on the side of the road to help a fellow driver. I remember having a trailer tire hit my windshield at 75 miles an hour, watching the driver in front of me panic as the inside tire blew too on that same axle. He got it to the shoulder and I pulled in behind him. Before I could get out of my truck their were 3 more trucks pulling over in front of us and behind us. We checked on each other. Had a few laughs. And went down the road a piece with that driver in the middle. Limping all the way at about 5 miles an hour.

I believe though that their are many out their today who have the same heart as we did back then. Its just that their are way too many that don't. It really is up to people like Daniel B to bring that realness of a 'true driver' back again.

Driver like "BIG JOE" . You know who I'm talking about StarCar. PHANTOM 309. Red Sovine sung the song about him back in 1968. Now that was a song. Still is a good one. Now that was a story. That was a TRUE DRIVER. Or the one everyone knows, TEDDY BEAR. That song still makes me cry.

WE could have that again in our profession. This website could make it happen! Who's with me? Next time you see another driver passing you by, WAVE. If you see a driver swerving in his lane. Get on the radio and start talking to him to keep him awake. Get him to pull over at the next exit and share a cup of joe with him. It's easy. It just has to be in your heart.

Wow! this whole experience is something else for me. Yes, Virginia there is a Santa Claus. And yes Joe, theirs a real PHANTOM 309.

"10-4 GOOD-BUDDY"

wtf-2.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RedGator's Comment
member avatar

I try to be nice to drivers but Tracey If I wave at a driver or say hi I get cat calls:/

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I try to be nice to drivers but Tracey If I wave at a driver or say hi I get cat calls:/

Lol. When my wife was with me I was walking through the truck stop parking lot and we were holding hands. And people were honking and yelling. It was weird. I don't know if they just haven't seen a female in years or if they're being nice or if they're complimenting her or if they're just being pathetic. My wife thinks that they're just pathetic.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I try to be nice to drivers but Tracey If I wave at a driver or say hi I get cat calls:/

double-quotes-end.png

Lol. When my wife was with me I was walking through the truck stop parking lot and we were holding hands. And people were honking and yelling. It was weird. I don't know if they just haven't seen a female in years or if they're being nice or if they're complimenting her or if they're just being pathetic. My wife thinks that they're just pathetic.

That is one of those situations Daniel that happen where ever you may go. She must be a very beautiful lady. I'm sure she is. Men are men. And unfortunately some have no control over the animal which lies within. I too apologize for all those who have been disrespectful to your wife. Just know Daniel that she is yours and those making the noises can tell you have something very special. Something they wish they had.

But, you are both right. It saddens me too. Our culture has changed so much. I know in my heart though that in the end it will be alright again. It's just getting to the end that is so hard.

Some of the other post had stated though that we could get back to that way of life in our trucking family. And he is so very correct. It starts with ONE person. That has been the premise for generations. ONE person ONE voice. I pray that through this website many of the new drivers hitting the road today will see a different path in which to drive. They will not just see the painted lanes on the highways, but the sculptured landscape which approaches before them.

Don't know if I will ever pass you two on the road, (RedGator and Daniel B), but I will keep waving just in case I do, for you deserve the respect and admiration that is due.

KEEP ON TRUCKING!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

"oops", my statement to RedGator didn't go through.

I hate it when that happens RedGator. I would knock that sucker on his nose if I were present. Please accept my apology for all those uncultured Yahoo's that don't know how to show a lady respect.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!
WE could have that again in our profession. This website could make it happen! Who's with me?

I'm with ya!!!

Actually, for quite some time now I've been pondering putting together some sort of a "pledge" of professionalism or an organization for drivers to join. It would be like a brotherhood of drivers that understand the importance of professionalism and would like to revive the image of the industry.

I wrote an article about the situation called A Look In The Mirror.

There's a fascinating contrast of behaviors in trucking that I think serves as a prime example of the choices we make. When you listen to the CB on channel 19 you'll hear tons of filth - arguing, cussing, criticizing, racism - just nasty stuff. But then you get out of your truck and walk into the truck stop and those same people that were just screaming filth on the CB are now holding the door open for you, smiling, and saying hi to you as you walk in. You go get breakfast at the restaurant, strike up a conversation at the restaurant counter with other drivers, and have the most pleasant morning imaginable. What a stark contrast it is.

I would love to see drivers choose to live their lives with a high level of integrity and expect it of each other. And that's exactly what it is - a choice we all make. Who are you going to be today? What standards will you hold yourself to? How will you treat each person you come across? That's who we are as individuals and that's who we are collectively as truckers - we're the sum of our choices. Our expectations of ourselves.

I think there's a lot of truckers out there today that would never go for this. Not at first, anyhow. But many would. And most of the new truckers would. I think you could start a massive movement and bring attention to the idea of returning to a "Knights Of The Road" way of living and doing our jobs.

Hey, this website right now is getting over 110,000 unique visitors per month. Any message we send will hit over a million people a year. There are only 3.5 million drivers in the nation and the turnover in trucking is high. If we had the right pledge or organization we could quickly change the entire industry. TruckingTruth has become like "the orientation" for the trucking industry. This is where you get started in the industry. So we can get this message to new drivers as they get their career started. It could catch on in a big way!

All we need to do is name this organization, define "the pledge", and find someone to make 1 million magnets and T-shirts!

smile.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dominic P.'s Comment
member avatar

I like the idea of drivers looking out for one another and helping each other out. As a new driver I see what I will call contempment for other drivers, I would like to see more hand rasing light flashing and drivers looki g out for other drivers. I have also heard my trainer say he dose not even bother turning on his cb because their is nothing but a lot of trash talking. I have turned on the cb the few times I have spent the night alone in the truck all I heard was static not drivers chatting nothing. I know we drive when we are not driving we are sleeping. I would at least exspect to hear drivers passing by on the highway chatting but I do not know. I have also only been on the road for 3 weeks.

Larry E.'s Comment
member avatar

Overall, I have found the CB quasi useful. 99% of the time it is just noise with inane comments and chatter that is useless. (Comments like, "I think I just pooped my pants") That other 1% has helped with getting in the correct lane for an accident or at least understanding why traffic is stopped. I acquired a CB that was left in a truck and a mic that doesn't work so I am on receive only. There have been maybe two times when I wished I could transmit. 1) a flatbed hauling drilling pipe that had a cap rolling around on the deck and 2) the driver that told me (hey skateboarder) the lady in the car that just passed you has a dog in her lap and just slammed on the brakes in front of me. Beware.

I have seen a lot of drivers helping each other out in the parking lot; sometime not really wanted or valid help. I always try to be positive and help people out. Some are very leary, but if you are friendly most times people are friendly back. Those are face to face encounters. It is the annonimity of the radio, being in "my" truck or the internet that tends to let the "real" person come out.

Brett, when you get the t-shirts (or want orders) I will buy a couple to proudly wear.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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