Frustrated Trainee

Topic 1460 | Page 1

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Mark D.'s Comment
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Hi Everyone, well I started with my Trainer Wednesday August 4th. (I won't mention company name) Actually let me step back to the 2 days of classroom orientation, complete waste of time. the 2 safety people that were suppose to go through everything with us in orientation were more worried about how early they could get out of work than to teach us anything. On to the 9 days I stayed on my Trainers truck. Right from the start the company decided to run my Trainer and I as a team instead of a training truck. This was not fare to me as I wasn't getting any training or any of my observation time done since the trainer had to sleep so we both could put in our H.O.S. In 9 days I had a total of 7.25 hours of observation time signed off and 3500 miles logged. I did contact my SDM student driver mgr. and my Trainer contacted his FM fleet mgr. several times. their answer was both the same, get the orientation hours done ASAP. I spoke to my Trainer and his answer was "pack your stuff and run from this company" NOT at all the way I wanted to start my Driving career. I am home regrouping and checking with other companies so I am not at all throwing in the towel but what do you veterans think, should I have sucked it up and stuck it out and kept putting up with their B.S. or??? Thanks, I appreciate any constructive advice for sure. Thanks for listening. Mark

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

You should have sucked it up and rolled with the punches. What exactly happened is that you rocked the boat, they saw you as nothing but a person who will be a complainer so they let you go. Most of the large companies run the truck as a team. It's more profit for them because they have a team truck instead of a solo truck, it's also more profit for your trainer because be gets paid for his miles and your miles.

During your training time it's very important to be a punching bag. Literally. You're going to go through so much crap and if you complain about it all they won't like it. You just got to keep telling yourself that you'll be solo and won't have to put up with it. This is simply a perfect example of rocking the boat as an unproven rookie.

I realize its tough to learn when your trainer isn't near you. Believe me I've bad my share of frustrations because he was sleeping. Example, I was driving to Wausau WI and didnt know how to do local directions. I tried for 30 minutes to wake my trainer up. I tried to freeze him with the blistering wisconsin weather, I turned up the radio, I yelled, and he still didnt wake up. So I followed his stupid Garmin and it led me to downtown Wausau. Where I was pulled over by a cop for being on a non truck route. Thankfully he was understanding and let me go. But I didn't call every contact I knew to let them know. This is why we say you must be tough skinned for this job.

Now, I'm not trying to bash you. We all make mistakes. You've still got a bright future. But take this as a failure on your part and learn something from it. Most carriers run trainer/trainee teams, it's just something you must get used to. Move on and I'm sure you'll do fine at your next company! Good luck sir!

Mark D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Daniel, I may have came across as a complainer but if I am a complainer because I want to learn this business the right way then yep I am a complainer. As for them letting me go, NOT true. That was my choice. I do understand and hear what you're saying, some I agree completely with and some I don't. life on these forums. I will succeed and move on with a better company. Thanks for your input. Mark

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Yes, you should have stayed. Here is how I took my training: Please let me drive!!!! If I wasn't driving, I was watching and learning what I could. Me and my trainer were polar opposites with something in common... Trucking. Orientation is when the company analyzes you and tells you what they expect, that is about it.

Sounds to me like you were in a toxic environment, but, no one controls your actions. Maybe too many folks there have worked around bad attitudes and could really use a positive shot. Basically what I am saying is, if you want to be a trucker, you have to suck it up and look forward to the day you are sitting in your own truck, with your rules and your own routine. As hard as it gets, try to keep a good outlook while letting the bs slide right off of you.

By the way, my last day of training was today. My journey started August 8th. Hang in there.

Tracey K.'s Comment
member avatar

Yep, Daniels right. You have to be tough. This is not a job for the week hearted. You said it though so I know you can do it. "Suck It Up".

Many have learned the same thing you just did. Get back on that horse and RIDE!

Heck call them and tell them you screwed up and you are ready to go back to work. You could be solo by NEW YEARS EVE. Cool way to start off the new year. Humility! Goes a long way.

Good Luck.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Daniel, I may have came across as a complainer but if I am a complainer because I want to learn this business the right way then yep I am a complainer. As for them letting me go, NOT true. That was my choice. I do understand and hear what you're saying, some I agree completely with and some I don't. life on these forums. I will succeed and move on with a better company. Thanks for your input. Mark

Alright, I misunderstood about the letting go part. It sounded like your trainer got the authority to kick you off the truck. But since you voluntarily left it changeseverything.

I suggest you find a company that does training in a solo truck environment. You'll have to do some digging around but there is a few companies that do that. I understand that you just want to learn the business the right way. But truth be told, even if you'll be training as a solo with a trainer, by the time the solo promotion comes around you still won't feel truelly prepared. The real learning begins when you go solo. Nothing beats learning how to back up when it's 2200 and you've been driving all day and have to back up into a tight spot in a truck stop. That's when you really learn how to move a truck.

Mark D.'s Comment
member avatar

I hear ya guys, I do appreciate the tips and fully understand what I need to do. Thanks again, will keep you posted.

Britton R.'s Comment
member avatar

I say suck it up. I'm training now. We aren't running as a team but my trainer sits shotgun and plays with his phone paying no attention to me. The first week or so was insane. I just have a permit and they threw me in the truck with zero driving experience. It was somewhat terrifying. But I learn more and more. A lot is me just figuring it out. A crappy way to learn, but I'm learning.

Stick it out and it will come. Best of luck to you.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

A crappy way to learn, but I'm learning.

Stick it out and it will come. Best of luck to you.

How is driving a truck a crappy way to learn to be a truck driver? I have to ask and do not mean to be an ahole. Britton, My trainer sat in the jump seat playing some game and seemingly not paying attention to my driving. He was paying attention, but, he did not show it. There is reason for this. What a student should do is drive the truck and trailer with a curiosity and purpose...safely.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Mark...I know where you were, runnin' a team truck, and you wanting to learn....When I came back into trucking, we bought our first truck, and to pay for it, we HAD to team it. TSB was a seasoned 25+ year driver, but I hadn't been in a truck for years..And I had only driven intrastate at that !! So I HAD to suck it up...TSB HAD to get some sleep. I'm not ashamed to say, that for 6 months, I was in a emotional state of abject terror all the time. I didn't want to admit it, cuz TSB would tell me I didn't have to drive, and we'd lose the truck...so I just DID IT. And you know what ??? One day, I got behind the wheel to pull my shift, and my "DGS" attitude kicked in...I decided I didn't need to look in my rearview mirrors, unless I wanted to change lanes...I decided that I'd drive the speed I was comfortable at, I'd just drive longer to get my miles in...I decided to take control of the situation I had put myself in...and it gave me courage. I settled down and LEARNED by doing. TSB told me up front that he couldn't teach me to back up...it took me forever, but with a little suggestion from a little old truck driver, by george, I learned it myself, and I'm danged good at it. So even tho you and I got a rough start in trucking...you will be like me...your DGS (don't give a sh****t) attitude will kick in, and you will grow a brand new pair !!!! So settle down, find a company, and start over again...you can do it, if this little fluffy redhead can do it !!!!

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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