Trainer - Trainee

Topic 15416 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Alexander D.'s Comment
member avatar

If you don't connect on many levels with your Trainer would it count against you if you asked your company for a new one? Are there legitimate reasons to ask for a new trainer?

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Legitimate reasons would be stuff like:

Trainer asking you to do things illegal/unsafe (intentional log violations, equipment violations, etc). Threats of violence or violence. Sexual harassment. Horrible hygiene habits (like a bunch of pee bottles flying around the sleeper).

"Not connecting on many levels" is kind of vague.

What kind of issues are you having?

Most folks would tell you to just stick it out - it's not a forever thing.

Rick

Alexander D.'s Comment
member avatar

None. I'm watching youtube video's but you answered my question. I am trying to get federal funding for school.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Alexander, I agree with Rick on this one. If you have a legitimate reason it is okay to ask for a different trainer, but make dang sure it is a legitimate reason that you can no longer deal with and it concerns your safety or making sure you are running legally. The time with a trainer is really just a buffer period for the company to help you adjust to the lifestyle and the rigorous schedule of a life on the road. We sometimes liken it to training wheels on a bicycle. Eventually those training wheels go away, but you still aren't proficient at riding that bike. After you skin your knees a few times you begin to get the idea of how to make it work.

I understand people's apprehension with being stuck with a trainer that they don't connect with. I had a terrible time with my trainer - I documented much of that time in this forum, but there were so many stories I never shared here. This is the first thing my trainer asked me when we met... "Say man, do you like girls with big bootys?" I knew I was in for an experience when that was the first thing out of his mouth! He even picked up a woman to ride with us while we made a stop at a Wal-Mart for groceries! I had stayed in the truck just to take a break from him, and I had enough supplies for myself. After about thirty minutes of waiting in the truck I see him coming out to the truck with a cart of groceries and a woman walking along with him. When she saw me in the truck, she said, "Who's dat?" Trainer says, "Oh that's my trainee." Irate woman says, "You aint said nothing bout no trainee riding along with us, all you said was you was gonna take me to New York City! I aint riding along with both of you dudes, you gotta be crazy!" She left, and I breathed a sigh of relief!

I recommend that folks try to stick it out with their trainer. I've been criticized for my position on this, but for me it was the best way to handle that time. I actually learned a lot from a guy who I never would have been friends with on any level. He really wasn't very good at training, he really just wanted somebody to help him turn some miles, but I questioned him about the things I wanted to know or wasn't comfortable with and he gave me the answers. Some of his advice I knew was questionable just because of my exposure to this forum, and I could mark it off as bad advice. You can read a little story I put together about my training experience that is in our Blogs Section of the web site.

I really do look at that time with a trainer as a buffer period. It gives you a chance to get accustomed to handling that rig for a while with someone right there with you to help keep you from making a major mistake. It puts you into real world situations as a driver, and it exposes you to how hard you need to work at this so you can become successful at it. Trucking is so different from any other job that most people are blindsided by how exhausting it can be to a new rookie who is thinking how fun the freedom of being out on the open road is going to be. That first four to six weeks with a trainer helps you adjust and get with the program. Often times people confuse how stressful that initial introduction to trucking is as stress being caused by their trainer - that is a mistake that causes people to want to switch trainers. There were several times when I wanted to just throw my hands up and quit while I was in training. I am so glad I stuck it out with my trainer, even though he was not a stellar character or trainer. Just the time of having someone there along side me to kind of ease me into the transition of being a solo driver was beneficial to the start of my career.

One more thing, I consider that entire rookie year as a training period. There is no possible way for you to learn everything you need to know to be successful out here during a four week training session - that is why I refer to it as a buffer period. You will learn so much more while you are on your own, and with a supportive group like you will find here at Trucking Truth, you can always jump in here for some advice when you need it.

It's tough spending that time with a trainer, but it is a short time in the overall scheme of things. Don't be the guy who wants to switch trainers for a trivial reason, and then goes from the frying pan into the fire. Hang tight, prove you can handle a little pressure, because brother the pressure is going to multiply as soon as you are off that trainer's truck. I was elated to be rid of my trainer, and then about three days later I was just wishing like crazy I had him there in the jump seat so I could ask him a question or two about the predicament I was in!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Alexander D.'s Comment
member avatar

Alexander, I agree with Rick on this one. If you have a legitimate reason it is okay to ask for a different trainer, but make dang sure it is a legitimate reason that you can no longer deal with and it concerns your safety or making sure you are running legally. The time with a trainer is really just a buffer period for the company to help you adjust to the lifestyle and the rigorous schedule of a life on the road. We sometimes liken it to training wheels on a bicycle. Eventually those training wheels go away, but you still aren't proficient at riding that bike. After you skin your knees a few times you begin to get the idea of how to make it work.

I understand people's apprehension with being stuck with a trainer that they don't connect with. I had a terrible time with my trainer - I documented much of that time in this forum, but there were so many stories I never shared here. This is the first thing my trainer asked me when we met... "Say man, do you like girls with big bootys?" I knew I was in for an experience when that was the first thing out of his mouth! He even picked up a woman to ride with us while we made a stop at a Wal-Mart for groceries! I had stayed in the truck just to take a break from him, and I had enough supplies for myself. After about thirty minutes of waiting in the truck I see him coming out to the truck with a cart of groceries and a woman walking along with him. When she saw me in the truck, she said, "Who's dat?" Trainer says, "Oh that's my trainee." Irate woman says, "You aint said nothing bout no trainee riding along with us, all you said was you was gonna take me to New York City! I aint riding along with both of you dudes, you gotta be crazy!" She left, and I breathed a sigh of relief!

I recommend that folks try to stick it out with their trainer. I've been criticized for my position on this, but for me it was the best way to handle that time. I actually learned a lot from a guy who I never would have been friends with on any level. He really wasn't very good at training, he really just wanted somebody to help him turn some miles, but I questioned him about the things I wanted to know or wasn't comfortable with and he gave me the answers. Some of his advice I knew was questionable just because of my exposure to this forum, and I could mark it off as bad advice. You can read a little story I put together about my training experience that is in our Blogs Section of the web site.

One more thing, I consider that entire rookie year as a training period. There is no possible way for you to learn everything you need to know to be successful out here during a four week training session - that is why I refer to it as a buffer period. You will learn so much more while you are on your own, and with a supportive group like you will find here at Trucking Truth, you can always jump in here for some advice when you need it.

It's tough spending that time with a trainer, but it is a short time in the overall scheme of things. Don't be the guy who wants to switch trainers for a trivial reason, and then goes from the frying pan into the fire. Hang tight, prove you can handle a little pressure, because brother the pressure is going to multiply as soon as you are off that trainer's truck. I was elated to be rid of my trainer, and then about three days later I was just wishing like crazy I had him there in the jump seat so I could ask him a question or two about the predicament I was in!

That was a pretty interesting story it actually painted a picture of my head with the whole Walmart dealio Lol. Yeah, I appreciate both your responses. I was afraid I'd bump heads with my Trainer or just think he was useless or even worse might be that I didn't measure up to his standards! So generally speaking if it's legal, safe and no **** bottles flying around - It's a learning lesson of dealing with people but more importantly I'll be focused on Listening and asking lot's of questions.........................He can fire me for asking too many questions if he thinks he can.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More