Qualcomm

Topic 1652 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Danny S.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been wondering what kind of information that you receive on the qualcomm when you get a load. I found on TT where it had a list of things it could give you. But I wanted see it and so I found some videos on YouTube with a guy driving for Swift Transportation that were really great. This is the first in the series, there are about six of them. I am sure that not all companies use all the features that he was using I guess but I thought this was very informative and would recommend it all us newbies that are just getting into trucking. Let me know your opinions especially you more experienced drivers.

The Paper & Macro work Behind Trucking Vol. 1

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey that's very cool - thanks for letting us know about that! For anyone interested in learning more about the Qualcomm system that drivers use, well there ya go!

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

I have watched a couple of his videos, but had not seen this one. Thanks.

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

I took a look at the video and I thought it was very informative. Coming from a person that does not know anything about this stuff, I think I would want to learn the paper way to do things so I would understand what the Qualcomm is doing for me.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

I took a look at the video and I thought it was very informative. Coming from a person that does not know anything about this stuff, I think I would want to learn the paper way to do things so I would understand what the Qualcomm is doing for me.

You have to learn the paper way, and have a paper log book with you in case the elog has problems from what I understand. But you only have to use the paper if elog goes down.

I watched another video where the guy suggested using paper logs to plan his trips. He would void one out and use it to map his hours for the upcoming trip.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

After watching some of his videos, I think there is a deeper lesson to be learned. His showing how some of the Qualcomm is great but pay attention to what he is doing.

When he puts in his arrival date he always chooses the latest time possible. He schedules himself for 8 hrs driving and shoots for a certain miles per day. When he hits those miles he says he can pretty much stop even though he has time left on his 11 hr clock.

Later he has a video saying he is leaving swift. Why? Because he is not making enough money. Can anyone figure out why?

I know I am new to all of this. But one thing I know I have learned from Brett's book and all of the great posters here on the forum is its about getting the loads delivered as safely and quickly as possible. I know everyone will have different goals, but it sounds like his is to make more money. To do so he should have been looking at his log book instead of looking for another company. In a later video he is even talking about going back to swift to become an O/O.

Just thought I would point it out for all the other newbies like me.

Woody

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Excellent points you make Woody.

I watched another video where the guy suggested using paper logs to plan his trips. He would void one out and use it to map his hours for the upcoming trip.

Be very careful about that. It's fine to do, but you don't want DOT seeing any sort of logbook pages or an extra logbook laying around that doesn't match the others. Back before electronic logs and all of the scrutiny that truckers get nowadays we used to run two (or more) paper logbooks so we could cheat the books. So the old school DOT officers are looking for that kind of thing. The big companies have gone to electronic logs but the majority of the industry is still on paper logs so that kind of cheating still goes on and DOT watches for it. They might jump up on the step of your truck to talk to you and see an extra logbook or extra pages laying around and now you have some serious explaining to do. Just be aware of that.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett, I meant to go into more detail about the things you mentioned (it was pointed out on the video) but I got side tracked.

Oh the problems with having a simple mind lol.

Woody

Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
member avatar

There are many things to look at when planning a trip and driving.

You mention about driving 8 like it was a bad thing. Yes a driver does have 11 hours they can drive. But remember. If you drive 11 hours everyday, day in and day out. You will eventually have to do a 34 or 36 hour restart.

During your restart you make NO money. My trainer had to take one, therefore we set. I make training pay, but he doesn't make a thing.

Yes, you should always get the load there on time and even early if you can, but you also have to keep an eye on your hours.

And I have found out since getting on the road. Calling a receiver if you are early. Not all companies allow that. We have already been told here. We go through our DM if we are early. We NEVER call a reciever without the DM's approval. If we do, we will be looking for a job somewhere else.

And going through your DM to request an early delievery. That can take a day or two to get an answer. So it kinda defeats the purpose. wtf.gif

Keep it safe out here. Joe S.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

Good post Joe, I did jump to some conclusions that could be wrong. That's the great thing about everyone's input here. Something that seems obvious to us getting started can have new light shed on it from those with more experience.

I really appreciate the input about going through the DM about arriving early. I was already thinking that's how I would prefer to do it, but had not even considered the delay that could result.

Woody

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More