34 Or Recap?

Topic 16815 | Page 2

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Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Lol Paul.. We are small but mighty. 550 trucks and about 4k trailers... Mostly in midwest.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

CT, 17 hours is a good bit of time left. Were it me, I'd leave at seven or eight tonight, take a ten at the receiver, and put myself as available for a load first thing Monday morning.

We really need more information to make a fully informed recommendation, but getting MT first thing in the morning is a pretty important factor when it comes to keeping yourself efficient.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

It depends on what you need to balance the efficiency vs having extra hours. If it was me I would do the 34 because I know that whatever I lose in efficiency on that one load will pay off later in the week because I'll be able to run harder. If your loads are pretty regular then it might make more sense to just go to the customer and do a 10 there.

Steve_HBG's Comment
member avatar

From someone with only eight months of solo OTR experience, try to avoid running on recaps, because your "Available Time" and your "Driving Time" decrease simultaneously when the "Total Available Time" reaches 11 hours or less. Plus, the three hours available between 14 and 11 is gone, meaning every time one stops for the mandatory 30 minute break and "other" business, the "Time Available to Work" continues its countdown and there's nothing we can do to stop it.

Here is a real life example to help explain my statement.

I had an assignment to drive 555 miles from a shipper in South Bend, IN to a receiver in Harrisburg, PA. I had 9.5 hours TOTAL left on my clock to begin my day at the Shipper's dock. After a five minute loading and pre-trip exercise, I had nine hours and 25 minutes left to drive. However, I had to take a 30 minute break somewhere in next seven hours and 55 minutes, leaving me with only eight hours and 55 minutes to drive 555 miles. I average 61 miles per hour. So, I could only drive 543.9 miles that day (legally), leaving me 11.1 miles short of my destination, save for one major problem: I needed to stop once or twice for other affairs.

In the end, I would up falling 30 miles short of my destination that day, and I had to start my next day a bit earlier than necessary. Plus, I was still running on recaps, so my TOTAL TIME AVAILABLE TO WORK kept ticking away while I was unloading and, then, reloading the next day.

That's why I prefer one of two alternatives: (1) Average 8.75 hours of work every day, and never run out of hours or (2) run as hard as possible to use up the 70 as quickly as possible and take a 34 hour reset.

Good luck out there, and Stay Safe!

It's snowing in the PNW already.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

From someone with only eight months of solo OTR experience, try to avoid running on recaps, because your "Available Time" and your "Driving Time" decrease simultaneously when the "Total Available Time" reaches 11 hours or less. Plus, the three hours available between 14 and 11 is gone, meaning every time one stops for the mandatory 30 minute break and "other" business, the "Time Available to Work" continues its countdown and there's nothing we can do to stop it.

Here is a real life example to help explain my statement.

I had an assignment to drive 555 miles from a shipper in South Bend, IN to a receiver in Harrisburg, PA. I had 9.5 hours TOTAL left on my clock to begin my day at the Shipper's dock. After a five minute loading and pre-trip exercise, I had nine hours and 25 minutes left to drive. However, I had to take a 30 minute break somewhere in next seven hours and 55 minutes, leaving me with only eight hours and 55 minutes to drive 555 miles. I average 61 miles per hour. So, I could only drive 543.9 miles that day (legally), leaving me 11.1 miles short of my destination, save for one major problem: I needed to stop once or twice for other affairs.

In the end, I would up falling 30 miles short of my destination that day, and I had to start my next day a bit earlier than necessary. Plus, I was still running on recaps, so my TOTAL TIME AVAILABLE TO WORK kept ticking away while I was unloading and, then, reloading the next day.

That's why I prefer one of two alternatives: (1) Average 8.75 hours of work every day, and never run out of hours or (2) run as hard as possible to use up the 70 as quickly as possible and take a 34 hour reset.

Good luck out there, and Stay Safe!

It's snowing in the PNW already.

If you just started your day then you have 14 hours in the day. You can only drive 9 hours and that's assuming you you did 15 mins pretrial and 15 min customer check out. You still have 14 hours to do it in and your 30 min break doesn't count off the 9.5

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Isaac H.'s Comment
member avatar

I think he only had 9.5 hours on his 70 hour clock. Which means everything on lines 3 and 4 count towards it.

I would drive as far as i could, split my break. Take an 8 and once the clock rolls over at midnight you can use that time to get to the con.

double-quotes-start.png

From someone with only eight months of solo OTR experience, try to avoid running on recaps, because your "Available Time" and your "Driving Time" decrease simultaneously when the "Total Available Time" reaches 11 hours or less. Plus, the three hours available between 14 and 11 is gone, meaning every time one stops for the mandatory 30 minute break and "other" business, the "Time Available to Work" continues its countdown and there's nothing we can do to stop it.

Here is a real life example to help explain my statement.

I had an assignment to drive 555 miles from a shipper in South Bend, IN to a receiver in Harrisburg, PA. I had 9.5 hours TOTAL left on my clock to begin my day at the Shipper's dock. After a five minute loading and pre-trip exercise, I had nine hours and 25 minutes left to drive. However, I had to take a 30 minute break somewhere in next seven hours and 55 minutes, leaving me with only eight hours and 55 minutes to drive 555 miles. I average 61 miles per hour. So, I could only drive 543.9 miles that day (legally), leaving me 11.1 miles short of my destination, save for one major problem: I needed to stop once or twice for other affairs.

In the end, I would up falling 30 miles short of my destination that day, and I had to start my next day a bit earlier than necessary. Plus, I was still running on recaps, so my TOTAL TIME AVAILABLE TO WORK kept ticking away while I was unloading and, then, reloading the next day.

That's why I prefer one of two alternatives: (1) Average 8.75 hours of work every day, and never run out of hours or (2) run as hard as possible to use up the 70 as quickly as possible and take a 34 hour reset.

Good luck out there, and Stay Safe!

It's snowing in the PNW already.

double-quotes-end.png

If you just started your day then you have 14 hours in the day. You can only drive 9 hours and that's assuming you you did 15 mins pretrial and 15 min customer check out. You still have 14 hours to do it in and your 30 min break doesn't count off the 9.5

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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