Brett Or Other Moderators - Just A Question Regarding The High Road Training Module

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Penny's Comment
member avatar

I'm confused about one of the questions in the High Road Training Module.

In this section: 2.7 Managing Space (continued) (and in the one before it), I've had an answer counted wrong regarding stopping an empty vehicle. The manual clearly states it takes longer to stop an empty than a heavily loaded one, and that trucks are designed to stop loaded so they do it more efficiently, and in the section where that is taught, that was the correct answer. But now it is reviewing me on that and counting that answer wrong and saying that a heavily loaded vehicle takes longer to stop, which actually makes sense except that isn't what is stated in the manual, so now I am completely confused.

Am I doing something wrong or not understanding the question completely now? That's entirely possible, but I wanted to figure out if I was misunderstanding something.

Thank you for your help!

Penny

Ben D. 's Comment
member avatar

I also had a problem on one of the questions - I can't remember exactly, but it asked how many seconds to leave in front of the vehicle you're following, I put down 6 seconds (it was a 60 foot trailer question), but the right answer was 7 seconds?

I'm confused about one of the questions in the High Road Training Module.

In this section: 2.7 Managing Space (continued) (and in the one before it), I've had an answer counted wrong regarding stopping an empty vehicle. The manual clearly states it takes longer to stop an empty than a heavily loaded one, and that trucks are designed to stop loaded so they do it more efficiently, and in the section where that is taught, that was the correct answer. But now it is reviewing me on that and counting that answer wrong and saying that a heavily loaded vehicle takes longer to stop, which actually makes sense except that isn't what is stated in the manual, so now I am completely confused.

Am I doing something wrong or not understanding the question completely now? That's entirely possible, but I wanted to figure out if I was misunderstanding something.

Thank you for your help!

Penny

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay...

1 second following distance per 10' of vehicle - ADD A SECOND over 40 MPH. So a 60' Rig moving at 60 MPH requires SEVEN SECONDS following distance.

Trailers are a MAX of 53 feet (unless you're running specialized/oversize) - so it's not a 60' trailer but a 60' RIG (Tractor & Trailer). And in reality - the total length of the rig is going to be OVER 60' total.

From Section 6 of the High Road Course:

Control your speed whether fully loaded or empty. Large combination vehicles take longer to stop when they are empty than when they are fully loaded. When lightly loaded, the very stiff suspension springs and strong brakes give poor traction and make it very easy to lock up the wheels. Your trailer can swing out and strike other vehicles. Your tractor can jackknife very quickly (see Figure 6-2 to the right). You also must be very careful about driving “bobtail” tractors (tractors without semitrailers). Tests show that bobtails can be very hard to stop smoothly. It takes them longer to stop than a tractor-semitrailer loaded to maximum gross weight.

A lot of times - when you get this question WRONG - it's because you didn't READ THE QUESTION CORRECTLY.

We have a tendency to "breeze through" multiple choice tests, when we're familiar with the material. The way the tests "trip us up" frequently, is to ask a question in the NEGATIVE (ie: what is NOT the correct answer) -and we're breezing through so fast, we answer in the affirmative.

The reason loaded stops more quickly than empty is PHYSICS - the weight of the load maintains the contact of the tires to the road, and keeps the suspension compressed so the tires stay planted. This allows for more effective braking.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

48' Trailer diagram of actual lengths of tractor-trailer semi pulling a 48 foot trailer

53' Trailer diagram of actual lengths of tractor-trailer semi pulling a 53 foot trailer

The ACTUAL LENGTH of a 265" Wheelbase Tractor (common, max wheelbase with 53' trailer) and a 53' trailer is going to be 73'. So the CORRECT FOLLOWING DISTANCE of Sleeper Tractor with a 53' Trailer at 60 MPH would actually be EIGHT SECONDS.

If you wanted to look at this in ACTUAL FEET: at 60 MPH, you are moving 88 FPS (feet per second). To maintain 8 seconds following distance - 88 X 8 = 704 feet. Since a FOOTBALL FIELD is 300 feet (100 yards, goal line to goal line) - the CORRECT FOLLOWING DISTANCE would be OVER TWO FOOTBALL FIELDS.

Rick

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Penny's Comment
member avatar

But I did read the question correctly. Numerous times and have missed it twice.

Here's the question:

Which statement is false?

1. The brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded.

2. The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb

3. Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction ****this was my answer

4. A heavily loaded truck will take longer to stop than an empty truck. ***this is what it is telling me the correct answer is.

This is what the manual says: Quote From The CDL Manual:

The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb. But the brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded. Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction. It can bounce and lock up its wheels, giving much poorer braking. (This is not usually the case with buses.)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This type of question is frequently asked on written exams. Understand that truck braking systems are designed for when the truck is fully loaded. An empty or very light truck will actually take longer to stop than a fully loaded and heavy truck.

Soooo, am I misunderstanding something?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Penny's Comment
member avatar

This question also has an incorrect answer (I assume a typo):

When a driver sees a roadway hazard, how long will it take for the drivers brain to process the situation (perception time)? 1/8 second 1/2 second 1 second 1-3/4 second

The answer as far as I can tell should be 3/4 second. The training is saying the answer should be 1-3/4.

Here's the manual on this one:

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The perception time for an alert driver is about 3/4 second. At 55 mph, you travel 60 feet in 3/4 second.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Perception time and distance must be memorized

I had answered 1 second because it was the closest answer to "about 3/4 second" but it was also counted incorrect which is why I think that 1 3/4 second thing is a typo.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

But I did read the question correctly. Numerous times and have missed it twice.

Here's the question:

Which statement is false?

1. The brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded.

2. The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb

3. Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction ****this was my answer

4. A heavily loaded truck will take longer to stop than an empty truck. ***this is what it is telling me the correct answer is.

This is what the manual says: Quote From The CDL Manual:

The heavier the vehicle, the more work the brakes must do to stop it and the more heat they absorb. But the brakes, tires, springs and shock absorbers on heavy vehicles are designed to work best when the vehicle is fully loaded. Empty trucks require greater stopping distances, because an empty vehicle has less traction. It can bounce and lock up its wheels, giving much poorer braking. (This is not usually the case with buses.)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This type of question is frequently asked on written exams. Understand that truck braking systems are designed for when the truck is fully loaded. An empty or very light truck will actually take longer to stop than a fully loaded and heavy truck.

Soooo, am I misunderstanding something?

Which statement is FALSE????? That's the QUESTION.

#4 is FALSE (as in the statment is NOT TRUE), so that is the CORRECT ANSWER for the question.

#3 is the INCORRECT ANSWER - because that answer is TRUE (as in - the information in that answer is NOT FALSE).

See what I mean about READING THE QUESTION?

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Penny's Comment
member avatar

Oh, and don't think I'm being cranky. This is INCREDIBLY helpful to go through the manual like this and is an awesome tool for which I thank you! I just want to make sure I am correct for my own sake. I would LOVE to ace my CDL test and if I do, it will be in large part because of the AWESOME information I'm getting here!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

This question also has an incorrect answer (I assume a typo):

When a driver sees a roadway hazard, how long will it take for the drivers brain to process the situation (perception time)? 1/8 second 1/2 second 1 second 1-3/4 second

The answer as far as I can tell should be 3/4 second. The training is saying the answer should be 1-3/4.

Here's the manual on this one:

Quote From The CDL Manual:

The perception time for an alert driver is about 3/4 second. At 55 mph, you travel 60 feet in 3/4 second.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Perception time and distance must be memorized

I had answered 1 second because it was the closest answer to "about 3/4 second" but it was also counted incorrect which is why I think that 1 3/4 second thing is a typo.

Kind of have this one wrong also...

Section 2.6 - Controlling Vehicle Speed

Three things add up to total stopping distance:

Perception Distance

+ Reaction Distance

+ Braking Distance

--------------------------

= Total Stopping Distance

Perception distance: The distance your vehicle travels, in ideal conditions; from the time your eyes see a hazard until your brain recognizes it. Keep in mind certain mental and physical conditions can affect your perception distance. It can be affected greatly depending on visibility and the hazard itself. The average perception time for an alert driver is 1¾ seconds. At 55 mph this accounts for 142 feet traveled.

Reaction distance: The distance you will continue to travel, in ideal conditions; before you physically hit the brakes, in response to a hazard seen ahead. The average driver has a reaction time of ¾ second to 1 second. At 55 mph this accounts for 61 feet traveled.

Braking distance: The distance your vehicle will travel, in ideal conditions; while you are braking. At 55 mph on dry pavement with good brakes, it can take about 216 feet.

Total stopping distance: The total minimum distance your vehicle has traveled, in ideal conditions; with everything considered, including perception distance, reaction distance and braking distance, until you can bring your vehicle to a complete stop. At 55 mph, your vehicle will travel a minimum of 419 feet.

Which states CDL manual are you looking at? Some states may be "slightly different".

This one may actually be INCORRECT - but for the sake of the training program - the CORRECT REVIEW QUESTION will correspond with the information given out in the coursework.

HEY BRETT - you might want to elaborate on this one...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh, and don't think I'm being cranky. This is INCREDIBLY helpful to go through the manual like this and is an awesome tool for which I thank you! I just want to make sure I am correct for my own sake. I would LOVE to ace my CDL test and if I do, it will be in large part because of the AWESOME information I'm getting here!!

Wasn't accusing you of being "cranky" - just that in this particular case, what I surmised ended up being true. ReadTheFrigginQuestion.

From my own personal experience - I tend to test REALLY RAPIDLY. School, Navy, Tech Schools, CDL test, etc. - I was ALWAYS the first one finished.

The folks that write "multiple choice tests" will frequently throw in "negative response questions" to make sure we're ACTUALLY READING THE QUESTION. This is true on the REAL CDL TESTS ALSO.

Just SLOW DOWN - take your time and READ THE QUESTION, before looking at the answers.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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