Snowing....and Now Scared

Topic 17053 | Page 1

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Kat's Comment
member avatar

Hey, all! I am on the infamous I-80 in Wyoming right now. Got caught in the storm that came roaring through yesterday and had my first accident involving another vehicle (not my fault though thankfully). I was eastbound, and saw traffic slowing due to a semi accident in front of me, so I got stopped well behind the truck in front of me. The person coming behind me wasn't paying attention I guess or going too fast because they had to swing around my left side to avoid hitting me. Next thing I know, I saw a tanker truck sliding sideways heading right for my rear end. Got smacked pretty good. Everything was shut down due to accidents in both directions, so I made it to Little America where I am now shut down until further notice.

I know there are mountains to the east of me, and I am really scared about driving in this mess now. My question is....how do you handle downhill grades when you have roads that are snowy with icy spots? I saw trucks sliding around on flat ground yesterday, so I can't imagine coming down a hill! Just talked to a guy delivering to the restaurant here, and he said the roads are closed for the time being except for "necessary" traffic (whatever that is) and that if you slide off the road there is a huge fine. I am definitely sitting until things improve, but when they do, how do I make it through the rest of this mess?

confused.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

For starters you already did several things right; you maintained a safe following distance otherwise you would have hit the vehicles ahead of you and second you shut down. Shut down until the storm subsides and the road surfaces are treated. Maintain communication with your driver leaders and management. Talk to them, they are there to help you.

Next once you are back in it and driving vigilantly manage the space around your truck, especially your following distance. When you are about to descend a grade drop your speed before you get to the crest, downshift to a safe gear and resist the temptation to brake hard, finesse the pedal and if you use the Jake have it on low and only engage it during brake application. Nice and easy. Refrain from abrupt steering wheel input, drive a smooth line. If you are in an auto shift transmission, put it in manual mode when in hilly-mountainous terrain.

Try to relax and not let the fear overcome your skill and judgement. Take your time and focus. You will be okay.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kat's Comment
member avatar

I drive an automatic, and when I had questions about how the manual shifting worked a few weeks ago, a guy in the shop at one of our terminals told me it was disabled. That's part of what worries me. I won't be able to hold the truck in a certain gear going downhill.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I drive an automatic, and when I had questions about how the manual shifting worked a few weeks ago, a guy in the shop at one of our terminals told me it was disabled. That's part of what worries me. I won't be able to hold the truck in a certain gear going downhill.

Okay. Even so, follow the same steps I suggested. Go slow and if need be use your four ways to warn others behind you.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kat what company do you drive for? The disabled manual mode doesn't seem right. The operation of this should be labeled on the dash somewhere in a yellow and black graphic. It might also be on the top of the visor. If so, test it out. You have time to figure it out.

The mechanic might have been too busy to explain how to use it. Not sure. I'd still call you driver manager and ask for assistance.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Kat's Comment
member avatar

Definitely going to take it slow. Thanks for the advice...will try to relax...and not moving from here until traffic is moving that way. I know that will help break up the mess on the road too.

Kat's Comment
member avatar

I drive for Prime. I had tried to use it, and got alarms going off all over the place. Read the book for the truck....still couldn't get it to work, so that's when I talked to the shop.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I drive for Prime. I had tried to use it, and got alarms going off all over the place. Read the book for the truck....still couldn't get it to work, so that's when I talked to the shop.

That surprises me. Have you run this by Rainy? I think she is in an auto shift.

To your credit you already exercised really good judgement. That puts you way ahead already and will enable your continued safety.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Rainy has a manual.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rainy has a manual.

Oooo thanks.

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