Background Check From Previous Truck Companies

Topic 17166 | Page 1

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Paul W.'s Comment
member avatar

So my question is this. Is it a wise decision to call and ask a company to change an event that they are calling an incident when there was no damages involved to other trucking company inquiries? After driving for about 10 months with one company and 76,000 miles, I decided it was time for me to leave a company that I originally started with. I already had my CDL when I started with them but I didn't really have any experience. I left on what I deem as good terms. Have them more than 2 weeks advance notice. Did not ever cuss anyone out. Only bad thing I did was I had one non injury accident back in January where I damaged the side market and skirt of the trailer, minor damage. The light was still fully operational. And caused damage to 2 yellow poles on a city property. Nothing major. Coupe of hundred dollars worth total maybe. I also called the local Sheriffs department to report myself and I only bring that up to state I'm not one who hides from my faults. Since that one I had what this company referred to an another incident' which really was a mistake on my part and could have caused damage but no damages were done and no injuries. I drove the front of the tractor onto a another company' S property in an attempt to backin to a very tight dock. There was some grass in the area but it was mostly dirt and gavel. The owner himself actually stated that all the grass had actually been destroyed by drivers of another company that deliverd to that shipper regularly. So the company I first drove for has reported it 2 serious incidents within a 12 month period and any and all inquiries that come in to them, they do not hesitate to say that I've had 2 serious incidents already. Nothing is on my DAC report and my driving record is clean. Not even the accident in January is on record anywhere. One employer who I spoke to suggested that maybe I could call this company and ask them since I no longer drive for them, if they could stop reporting it as an incident as it sounds much worst that what really happened. Can this even be considered as a good idea to call them and ask that or would I just be opening the door for more trouble? Thanks guys.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I don't see how it could hurt anything to ask but I doubt they're going to change anything.

I also don't understand how driving onto someone's grass got recorded as an incident. Someone had to have called your company and reported damages or something.

From now on when you apply somewhere you're probably just going to have to let them know that your last company is going to report two incidents that there are no record of and explain what happened. I'm not sure what else you can really do.

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Legally, your former company is not allowed to give details of your employment. Whencalled for a reference, companies are only allowed to give hire date, release date and whether or not you are eligible for rehire.

I know that in the real world, they give details, but in the legal world, what they are doing is against the law.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I know that in the real world, they give details, but in the legal world, what they are doing is against the law.

Which is why to this day I've always been puzzled about the very existence of the DAC report. Doesn't it seem like a blatant circumventing of the law? What am I missing?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Paul W.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm with you on the fact that driving on the grass is seen as an incident and even more so since there was no damage. Basically when I called my FM about a week later his almost exact words were, the safety manager upon seeing the grass in the photos automatically wrote it up as an safety incident. I'm not in any way trying to excuse myself or my mistakes but because they are categorizing it as 2 incidents, it has caused some doors to close for me unfortunately.

I don't see how it could hurt anything to ask but I doubt they're going to change anything.

I also don't understand how driving onto someone's grass got recorded as an incident. Someone had to have called your company and reported damages or something.

From now on when you apply somewhere you're probably just going to have to let them know that your last company is going to report two incidents that there are no record of and explain what happened. I'm not sure what else you can really do.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I know that in the real world, they give details, but in the legal world, what they are doing is against the law.

double-quotes-end.png

Which is why to this day I've always been puzzled about the very existence of the DAC report. Doesn't it seem like a blatant circumventing of the law? What am I missing?

There really is no reason for it, other than they really don't want you to be able to move on without all of the hassle of explaining two very minor incidents that they decided to document as serious safety violations.

JJ

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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