Got Prehired By Stevens Transport

Topic 17236 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Dominick V.'s Comment
member avatar

Flew down to Tampa and enrolled in Tampa Truck Driving School. In order for the school to take me I had to have a prehire from one of the affiliated companies that they work with.

Since I have a squeaky clean backround and driving history my recruiter told me that I qualify for Stevens. I got on the phone with Stevens while they ran my criminal and driving record and was told that i was all clear and "Welcome Aboard".

I have to go in to get my physical and drug test and so long as all is clear I start school on 1/9. School is 3 weeks and upon graduation I go out to Dallas Texas for orientation at Stevens.

If anyone has any knowledge or feedback on the company I'd greatly appreciate it.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Flew down to Tampa and enrolled in Tampa Truck Driving School. In order for the school to take me I had to have a prehire from one of the affiliated companies that they work with.

Since I have a squeaky clean backround and driving history my recruiter told me that I qualify for Stevens. I got on the phone with Stevens while they ran my criminal and driving record and was told that i was all clear and "Welcome Aboard".

I have to go in to get my physical and drug test and so long as all is clear I start school on 1/9. School is 3 weeks and upon graduation I go out to Dallas Texas for orientation at Stevens.

If anyone has any knowledge or feedback on the company I'd greatly appreciate it.

I am a Stevens Transport driver, who got my CDL from a independent school like you seem to have done.

They will drug test you again.

They will do their own DOT physical on you.

You will work 14 hour days during orientation for 3 or 4 days, so don't putz around after class. Get back to the hotel, and sleep.

Make sure the recruiter sends you a list of things to bring with you to orientation. Several recruiters did not provide those lists to my classmates. Mine did, fortunately.

Do not wait for the last shuttle to get you to class on time, because there usually aren't enough seats, and some late-risers are late every day. That's not the attention you want.

Bring your 10-year MVR and work history with you. A copy of your birth certificate & social security card as well.

If you get a CDL in a state that gives a paper, temporary CDL before they mail you a full CDL, make certain someone will get that CDL and forward it to Stevens, or to you. I had issues with my temporary CDL because I do not live near friends or family in GA, so getting my permanent CDL meant me leaving one trainer's truck and interrupting training for a week before I got on the next trainer's truck.

Stevens tries a hard sell on lease operation, even to new drivers. Don't do it. You don't know enough, and even if you did, you won't make much more money, if any. If you decide to become a trainer after a year or so with a good driving record, those numbers look better for a lease operator, but that requires being a trainer, which a lot of people simply aren't cut out for. I'm definitely not. If you are, it might be worth looking into.

Stevens does offer LOTS of field support to new drivers, even after being in the truck with a trainer. I am very happy with what I've learned here and the support I've received, even if I am less than thrilled by the fact that there is no raise for the first year. I'm still making 30 CPM , but I'm staying here to finish out a year, so I can go get better pay elsewhere and not have to spend more time in a 10x10 box with another trainer.

It's even possible that I might stay with Stevens if they raise my pay to 46+ CPM after my 1 year anniversary, but I doubt they will. They are a training company. It is their business model to train drivers, have them work cheap for a half year to a year, then wave goodbye as the experienced drivers go get better paying jobs. I bust my butt though, and I know Stevens will try to retain some good drivers with better pay than typical. If that happens with me, I might accept it, though Crete and Knight are looking damn good from my current seat.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dominick V.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice. I'm still weighing my options and have till first week of January to make a decision. I will continue to do research to make sure Stevens is the right choice for me. What concerned me is the low cpm and lower than average training pay. Which means i can go 3+ months before I start seeing somewhat decent money coming in.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice. I'm still weighing my options and have till first week of January to make a decision. I will continue to do research to make sure Stevens is the right choice for me. What concerned me is the low cpm and lower than average training pay. Which means i can go 3+ months before I start seeing somewhat decent money coming in.

This is true. From what I have seen, however, Stevens might pay less, but they train better, and offer new drivers better support. If you do a good job for Stevens, you will have absolutely no problem getting hired on by practically any carrier after six months to a year. Stevens company trucks are also all supplied with APUs and 1500 watt inverters, and the fleet is moving to fully automatic, though a lot of the training fleet is still manual at this time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Dominick V.'s Comment
member avatar

After watching some independent reviews by current Stevens drivers, one guy stated that their advertised yearly salary isnt really accurate. He stated that if you're looking clear even 40k/year you'd have to run about 3 months straight at a time. He mentioned how if you're looking to get home every 3-4 weeks, you'll get shorter routes with less mileage.

Any truth to this from your experience?

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

He stated that if you're looking clear even 40k/year you'd have to run about 3 months straight at a time. He mentioned how if you're looking to get home every 3-4 weeks, you'll get shorter routes with less mileage.

Any truth to this from your experience?

See, new drivers are pretty bad at time management in the beginning. It takes quite a while to become good at it. It's not just a matter of managing your available logbook hours, but you have to manage traffic, weather, appointment schedules, breakdowns, meals, showers, scaling, and a million other things.

Not only that, but to turn 2,800+ miles per week you're going to have to learn how to get some loads picked up and delivered ahead of schedule sometimes and how to lobby dispatch for more miles.

So a lot of new drivers get the impression you have to run for very long periods of time without any home time if you want to turn big miles. They simply haven't figured out all the tricks yet. I was in a regional division with US Xpress years ago and I averaged over 3,000 miles per week and I was home every weekend. It isn't easy, of course, but it's plenty doable. So no, you don't have to stay out for months at a time to turn big miles. Once you've proven that you're hard working, safe, reliable, and you've learned a long list of techniques experienced drivers use to turn more miles you'll be able to turn 3,000+ per week and still be home at least every two or three weeks, not two or three months.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

After watching some independent reviews by current Stevens drivers, one guy stated that their advertised yearly salary isnt really accurate. He stated that if you're looking clear even 40k/year you'd have to run about 3 months straight at a time. He mentioned how if you're looking to get home every 3-4 weeks, you'll get shorter routes with less mileage.

Any truth to this from your experience?

Well, I haven't gotten a W2 from Stevens yet, and I'm not going to add up all 83 of my trip payouts for you, but I'm averaging around 10,000 miles per month, and I've been going home for 4-5 days every 5-6 weeks.

So, including time off, and not including things like detention pay, holdover pay, school visits, etc, I'm making about $3000 per month, or 36,000 per year. It wouldn't be a stretch to say I could make up most of the difference between 36,000 and 40,000 with other income over the course of the whole year.

However, I do push for miles, fairly aggressively, in every way I can, and use up as much of my driving clock as I can manage, every day when I do have miles.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I'm averaging around 10,000 miles per month.......and use up as much of my driving clock as I can manage, every day when I do have miles

You still have plenty of time available on your logbook to turn quite a few more miles if you can get dispatch to hand them over. If you're staying out 5 - 6 weeks at a time you should be averaging right at 3,000 miles per week when you're running. Even with the time off you should be able to get in the range of 12,000 miles per month. Make sure you make all of your appointments on time, squeeze every minute you can out of that logbook, and keep lobbying dispatch for more miles. Let em know that 2,500 per week isn't enough anymore with the experience and performance you've shown to date.

In fact, since Stevens does pay less per mile than a lot of companies I would let them know in the most professional and genuine way that they're putting you in a spot where you're almost going to have to leave to look for greener pastures once your contract is up if they're not going to pay you more per mile and you're only averaging 2,500 miles per week to boot. You might have to be the squeaky wheel a little bit to get them to ratchet up the miles.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm averaging around 10,000 miles per month.......and use up as much of my driving clock as I can manage, every day when I do have miles

double-quotes-end.png

You still have plenty of time available on your logbook to turn quite a few more miles if you can get dispatch to hand them over. If you're staying out 5 - 6 weeks at a time you should be averaging right at 3,000 miles per week when you're running. Even with the time off you should be able to get in the range of 12,000 miles per month. Make sure you make all of your appointments on time, squeeze every minute you can out of that logbook, and keep lobbying dispatch for more miles. Let em know that 2,500 per week isn't enough anymore with the experience and performance you've shown to date.

In fact, since Stevens does pay less per mile than a lot of companies I would let them know in the most professional and genuine way that they're putting you in a spot where you're almost going to have to leave to look for greener pastures once your contract is up if they're not going to pay you more per mile and you're only averaging 2,500 miles per week to boot. You might have to be the squeaky wheel a little bit to get them to ratchet up the miles.

Heh. I get squeaky with them very regularly. The average Stevens Transport driver only drives about 70% of the miles I do. I have managed two 12,000 mile months. My first four months were in the 8000-9000 mile range

I don't have a contract with Stevens, because I got a grant for my school, so I can leave whenever I want. After one year is up, I will be having that conversation with Stevens, for certain, both for CPM , and for miles.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
It's even possible that I might stay with Stevens if they raise my pay to 46+ CPM after my 1 year anniversary, but I doubt they will. They are a training company. It is their business model to train drivers, have them work cheap for a half year to a year, then wave goodbye as the experienced drivers go get better paying jobs.

Hey Bob, You've been around here long enough to know better than to make a statement like that. That is your OPINION! You know what they say about opinions.

confused.gif

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More