Realistic Expected Avg. Hours Driving Per Day/week

Topic 17368 | Page 1

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Sam N.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey there,

The trucking industry seems like a good match for me but I have one concern: 70 hour work week.

The solitude, being away for weeks at a time is not an issue for issue for me. I actually love driving on the highway.

However, 10 or more hours a day seems a bit much. And at least 2 companies I have looked at said expect to hit 70hpw.

The question is: as truckermike points out the jobs are basically about from getting from point a to point b within a set amount of day/hours - are most jobs actually such that you must do 70 hours a week to be on time? Or is a 50 hour work week realistic?

Thanks guys.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

You can be ON DUTY for a maximum of 70 hours in an 8 day period. You can expect to be ON DUTY 10-12 hours per day, driving an average of 9-10. You can DRIVE a maximum of 11 hours in a 24 hour period, and be ON DUTY a maximum of 14 hours in the same 24 hour period. You should really read up on the Hours of Service regulations. Lots of good info on this site

good-luck.gif

Isaac H.'s Comment
member avatar

I know what you're thinking because i was thinking the same thing when i first started driving. However, you can not compare truck driving to a regular 9-5 job in hours worked or how we get paid. Your Probably thinking that you only work 40 hours a week and going to 70 is like working 30 hours of overtime a week.

Trust me, you'll eat up those 70 hours and wish you had more. Lol

The HOS service clocks does a good job (and sometimes too good) of making sure you have to stop to get enough rest.

The worst part for me is to get adjusted from day driving to night driving at a moments notice. ;)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Farmerbob1's Comment
member avatar

Hey there,

The trucking industry seems like a good match for me but I have one concern: 70 hour work week.

The solitude, being away for weeks at a time is not an issue for issue for me. I actually love driving on the highway.

However, 10 or more hours a day seems a bit much. And at least 2 companies I have looked at said expect to hit 70hpw.

The question is: as truckermike points out the jobs are basically about from getting from point a to point b within a set amount of day/hours - are most jobs actually such that you must do 70 hours a week to be on time? Or is a 50 hour work week realistic?

Thanks guys.

A lot depends on you, and the loads you get. Personally, I get a little upset if I don't do 70 hours on duty in six, or even five days, because that means I've been getting slack miles.

If I have a good run, two or three days or more, my first day is normally 13 hours on duty, because extra stops for scaling and (sometimes) new trailer inspection time, on duty shipper time, etc. After that I drive as hard as I can, pushing 12 hours on duty per day - as close as I can get to 11 hours driving, and 1 hour PTI and fueling per day.

But I run hard, then take 34's. Others do @ 10 hours per day and recapture hours from the prior week every night at midnight, and never take 34's.

If I have a nice set of loads, drop and hooks preferably, I can manage a 70 hour week, then take a 34, and do one more driving shift before the end of 7 days, giving me around 80-85 hours on duty for the week. I've only been lucky enough to get this density of work twice in nine months.

In the end though, I'd say that a 70 hour week is a LOT more likely than a 50 hour week. If you are only running 50 hour weeks, your company probably won't be making much profit from your truck.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Sam N.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all your help. One thing is for sure, truckers help each other like family.

next question: If I drive 9 hours a day - how many miles on average does that cover?

and last question: I understand that I will be away from home 21 days at a time or more. Question: can I arrange my jobs that I always have one day a week to my self w/o driving (even if it is in timbuctu)?

Sam N.'s Comment
member avatar

WHile on Duty but not driving, what are you doing?

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

WHile on Duty but not driving, what are you doing?

Pre/post trip inspections, loading/unloading, fueling, pick ups/deliveries. Anything that is job/work related.

Sam N.'s Comment
member avatar

While loading unloading pick ups deliveries can you sit down and read a book?

Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

Yes, you can do pretty much whatever you want to do.

JJ

Sambo's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all your help. One thing is for sure, truckers help each other like family.

next question: If I drive 9 hours a day - how many miles on average does that cover?

and last question: I understand that I will be away from home 21 days at a time or more. Question: can I arrange my jobs that I always have one day a week to my self w/o driving (even if it is in timbuctu)?

The mileage is going to depend on how fast your truck goes. My truck is governed at 63. When you factor in traffic, mountain grades, weather, fuel stops, and other things, it can change.

If I get a good day of running, I generally can put in about 565 miles. If you are in a truck set up to do 70mph, you can probably get about 600.

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