Been A While But Looking For Advice

Topic 17407 | Page 2

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Chelsea P.'s Comment
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Oh that post, sorry I was looking then but that person decided to go solo as well as me. So that didn't turn into anything. As far as regional goes, I do understand that the home time is different. For me, I'm looking for more frequency and getting home a few times a month. Before, I was staying out for two months to come home for a week. In hindsight of course, I was doing that completely wrong and really shouldn't do that again.

I did look at Roehl however I am physically unable to unload freight and have no clue how to operate a forklift. They told me that was going to be an issue with them. Both of my knees are damaged and I have exercise induced asthma which acts up in very hot or extremely cold temperatures. I can keep it under control in normal conditions but I need to watch how far I push it. So, I need a company that is first and foremost, no touch freight. Averitt did offer that to me so I am going to check into them. They told me to apply when I was ready and they would see what they could do with only 3 months of experience.

I was originally going with JB Hunt on one of their regional runs but because I had a minor accident (wasn't recordable or anything like that) they needed me to have more experience first and couldn't look at it again until June of this coming year. I live in Georgia so I was looking for Southeast Regional or a dedicated as the JB Hunt account I would have gotten was more dedicated that regional. So I do know that it's only a couple of days max but that's better than what I was doing before. Even PTL said their drivers are out 6-10 days at a time, but I don't know what their home time is exactly so I'm going to have to call them. Now, if PTL works out then I plan on staying with them. I just wanted to know what others thought of the company first.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Oh that post, sorry I was looking then but that person decided to go solo as well as me. So that didn't turn into anything. As far as regional goes, I do understand that the home time is different. For me, I'm looking for more frequency and getting home a few times a month. Before, I was staying out for two months to come home for a week. In hindsight of course, I was doing that completely wrong and really shouldn't do that again.

I did look at Roehl however I am physically unable to unload freight and have no clue how to operate a forklift. They told me that was going to be an issue with them. Both of my knees are damaged and I have exercise induced asthma which acts up in very hot or extremely cold temperatures. I can keep it under control in normal conditions but I need to watch how far I push it. So, I need a company that is first and foremost, no touch freight. Averitt did offer that to me so I am going to check into them. They told me to apply when I was ready and they would see what they could do with only 3 months of experience.

I was originally going with JB Hunt on one of their regional runs but because I had a minor accident (wasn't recordable or anything like that) they needed me to have more experience first and couldn't look at it again until June of this coming year. I live in Georgia so I was looking for Southeast Regional or a dedicated as the JB Hunt account I would have gotten was more dedicated that regional. So I do know that it's only a couple of days max but that's better than what I was doing before. Even PTL said their drivers are out 6-10 days at a time, but I don't know what their home time is exactly so I'm going to have to call them. Now, if PTL works out then I plan on staying with them. I just wanted to know what others thought of the company first.

Did u talk to prime? Our SE regional runs NC and down and across to TX. Its no touch freight and I THINK home every other weekend for reefer. But again..that depends on the loads..so if one week the load gets you home on thurs and the next time it might be Monday.

My friend just went solo and they did let her go home for both Thanksgiving and Christmas... But she didn't get home til black Fri due to a late load at shipper. That is how it goes...no schedule.

You said not to ask about Schneider... But I'll say this...my friend went SE regional and they got her back home to ATL every weekend. The other thing she really likes about them is she hates driving nights and they are told not to. All appts are set for day driving.

One of the reasons new drivers are told so often to stay with the first company is to prevent the "not enough experience" dilemma. Also keep in mind that if you do go regional, some companies later may not accept that as "experience". They want a year of OTR.

And again "a couple days max" is kinda not really true either. With 34 resets, you could get in at 0400 on Saturday and be expected to be on the truck 1400 Sunday. That will not seem like even 24 hours after you do laundry, a stock the truck and do a little family time. One of the reasons I didn't want regional.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I just typed in "southeast regional" on the search bar and saw KLLM -- my friend loves them and drives an auto. And Transport America.... H O Wolding all as having SE routes.

Type this into the search and check out the company review links on this site

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Chelsea P.'s Comment
member avatar

I did look at Prime when I was first looking at training companies, but they said on the website that it's 50% no touch freight. I'll look into it again and see if it's changed though. When I spoke with JB Hunt, they said 34-48 hours home time depending on freight which was fine with me because it was weekly. I could deal with that and make it work for me. And their regional was more like dedicated where you were on an account and delivered to DCs for one company in different states. Only reason it wasn't regional to me was because while most of it was down south, two locations were in New York but not NYC.

Like I said before, I would have stayed with Celadon for at least that year to get the experience but they didn't give me a choice. Honestly, I wouldn't go back to them anyway because I didn't like how they ran things. I liked just about every other DM aside from my main one but they wouldn't allow me to switch unless the manager saw something that he didn't agree with which I completely understand. The reason why I said not to ask about Swift and Schneider was because I had heard things from my teachers and trainer and none of them were good in regards to those companies.

I have seen a few companies that prefer OTR experience before hiring. I don't remember which ones though but I have seen that.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I work reefer for prime and I don't touch freight. I have the choice of doing it or hiring lumpers prime pays for. The only freight we are forced to is floral loads which are teams and you wouldn't do other than in training.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Chelsea P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hmm, interesting. Alright, what do you like about Prime? Why would you suggest it as a place for me to go? I'm assuming I can get in with only 3 months of experience otherwise you wouldn't have suggested it. Would I have to go through training? Would you recommend dry van or reefer? Please, give me more information about Prime from your point of view.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I have to do it. Look into H. O. Wolding. Great family feel. They are big on setting up a schedule that will work for you. Their pay is ok. Benefits are ok. I run SE Regional. But, because of where I live it is far more like a dedicated account. The vast majority of my loads are out of and back into SCA Dedicated in Cherokee, AL. The only time my schedule gets all messed up is when I go to Florida.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Our freight is majority no touch. The only freight you will actually touch is furniture. Even then you have to ask for permission. You do have to do blocking N bracing if required. I even asked about volunteering to do the unload for a certain place next time I am there (Sysco). The answer was no. I could only help if I was on a furniture load. Which I very rarely do. I have done 2. Didn't help with load or unload for either one.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I have to do it. Look into H. O. Wolding. Great family feel. They are big on setting up a schedule that will work for you. Their pay is ok. Benefits are ok. I run SE Regional. But, because of where I live it is far more like a dedicated account. The vast majority of my loads are out of and back into SCA Dedicated in Cherokee, AL. The only time my schedule gets all messed up is when I go to Florida.

Was hoping you'd jump.in ;)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hmm, interesting. Alright, what do you like about Prime? Why would you suggest it as a place for me to go? I'm assuming I can get in with only 3 months of experience otherwise you wouldn't have suggested it. Would I have to go through training? Would you recommend dry van or reefer? Please, give me more information about Prime from your point of view.

If you read my responses from page six to eight on the following thread you will see why I love prime. But keep in mind, this is my first trucking company, and I'm guessing most people love their company or wouldn't stay. I had such stressful jobs including the post offices where bosses screamed and were abusive that trucking is like a paid vacation.

click here for 6-8

Im not a truck number...my FM knows.me. we laugh. If I want miles I get it. If i need extra time for personal stuff, i ask for a later load. I can walk into any Dept in prime and meet the people I talk to on the phone. Everyone is so nice...the drivers are supportive. The owner plays basketball everyday on an indoor court with the employees. Our terminals are filled with cafes, day spas, workout rooms, pool tables, even a movie theater. We are pet friendly ;).

They have a "we can solve the problem if you tell us about it" environment. But they can't fix what they don't know.

They don't do dry van..reefer flatbed tanker and intermodal.

I get all kinds of bonuses...even got a Christmas bonus last year with only a month employment.

Would you need to go with a trainer? For at least a month. Almost any company will put you with a trainer to show you their procedures and methods.

I would just apply everywhere using the link I posted earlier..you can do it with one **** for all different companies. See who calls you back and ask them about the regional.

Getting terminated looks bad...and do you know what they put on your DAC? Any tickets or accidents?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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