Stevens Transport Newbie Has Questions!

Topic 18553 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Chris D.'s Comment
member avatar

So FINALLY the opportunity to go over the road has come around, so I'm hopping on it. I'm enrolled in Tennessee Truck Driving School right now and I've already got hired on with Stevens transport. I do have some questions about them though.

1. How big of a mini fridge can I put in their trucks? 2. Can I bring my dog? 3. How are they as far as home time? I understand they said I'll likely be out 2-3 weeks at a time with 2-3 days off accordingly. 4. My recruiter for Stevens said I'll average 3100 miles a week, even though I'm new. I'm not holding my breath on this one though. Any idea how accurate this may be?

I do have more but I'll stop with these for now lol

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

https://www.truckingtruth.com/trucking-companies/

This might give you an idea of things. Just find them on the list.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Chris welcome to the forum. Before answering your questions I suggest (if you haven't already) you review/read the following links:

Truck Driver's Career Guide

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

High Road Training Program

The above information will help you establish a realistic set of expectations and goals. Many new drivers enter this profession with lofty, ridiculous expectations that are quickly dashed when they begin to experience the realities of this industry. The High Road Training Program is a CBT curriculum designed to enable a new student driver to more easily pass the permit exam and grasp new concepts quickly and completely. It's highly recommended even if you have other study aids and guides.

Click this link for specific information on Stevens Transport. Many of your current and possibly future questions can be answered by reviewing this link.

Okay...so please realize that your Stevens offer is contingent on getting your CDL and passing Steven's physical, drug test and background check. You will also be going through an orientation process that is more like an extended interview. No guarantees. Once all of that occurs, you will be required to road train with a Stevens Trainer/Mentor for a set period of time, likely 4-6 weeks. Verify that with your recruiter. The recruiter quoted you an average of 3100 miles per week...I'd ask that same question of your trainer. In the first few months of your solo career, I think 2500-2700 is probably more realistic and will reduce the potential for disappointment. As you gain experience and begin to prove yourself as a solid performer, building a professional and trusted relationship with your dispatcher/driver manager, your mileage will begin to increase.

The home time is also somewhat subjective. In the beginning, you should try to run your a** off to learn as much as you can as quickly as you can. I know home-time is important, but it should be a secondary consideration to learning your new job. A job that is completely unlike anything you have ever attempted or experienced, with a very steep and at times unforgiving learning curve. IMO and many others on here share the same thought, stay out as long as you can. Try not to ask for home-time every two weeks. Your dispatcher/driver manager notices that you really want to work. Set yourself apart from the rest of the rookie pack and you are more likely to get the longer runs.

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Chris, G Town just gave you some great advice on the real important stuff. Let me answer your Mini Fridge question. I recently bought a Dometic CF 18. It is a true compressor driven refrigerator (freezer), one or the other, not both at the same time. It is not a thermoelectric cooler. (those are good too). Google both of them if you are unfamiliar with the terms. The Dometic CF 18 is an "Ice Chest" style refrigerator. I weighs about 35 pounds empty. It plugs in directly to a 12 volt power outlet (cigarette lighter type). They make bigger ones but they may take up more space and be less portable than you desire. Mine works fantastic and there is no installation required. I paid $350.00 on Amazon. It sits on the floor in the sleeper out of the way. I would highly recommend it to anyone. Good luck on your new adventure!

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kendrick G.'s Comment
member avatar

Did they switch it to hair test

Chris welcome to the forum. Before answering your questions I suggest (if you haven't already) you review/read the following links:

Truck Driver's Career Guide

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

High Road Training Program

The above information will help you establish a realistic set of expectations and goals. Many new drivers enter this profession with lofty, ridiculous expectations that are quickly dashed when they begin to experience the realities of this industry. The High Road Training Program is a CBT curriculum designed to enable a new student driver to more easily pass the permit exam and grasp new concepts quickly and completely. It's highly recommended even if you have other study aids and guides.

Click this link for specific information on Stevens Transport. Many of your current and possibly future questions can be answered by reviewing this link.

Okay...so please realize that your Stevens offer is contingent on getting your CDL and passing Steven's physical, drug test and background check. You will also be going through an orientation process that is more like an extended interview. No guarantees. Once all of that occurs, you will be required to road train with a Stevens Trainer/Mentor for a set period of time, likely 4-6 weeks. Verify that with your recruiter. The recruiter quoted you an average of 3100 miles per week...I'd ask that same question of your trainer. In the first few months of your solo career, I think 2500-2700 is probably more realistic and will reduce the potential for disappointment. As you gain experience and begin to prove yourself as a solid performer, building a professional and trusted relationship with your dispatcher/driver manager, your mileage will begin to increase.

The home time is also somewhat subjective. In the beginning, you should try to run your a** off to learn as much as you can as quickly as you can. I know home-time is important, but it should be a secondary consideration to learning your new job. A job that is completely unlike anything you have ever attempted or experienced, with a very steep and at times unforgiving learning curve. IMO and many others on here share the same thought, stay out as long as you can. Try not to ask for home-time every two weeks. Your dispatcher/driver manager notices that you really want to work. Set yourself apart from the rest of the rookie pack and you are more likely to get the longer runs.

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More