Driving To The West Coast!?

Topic 1872 | Page 2

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PR aka Road Hog's Comment
member avatar

Skip the chains and drop down to pick up 40 it's a flatter ride. Also depending on where in LA you are going where black to avoid gang colors. What else ... Expect to pay for parking at the truck stops and PAY for parking my company recently had a truck and trailer stolen from Ontario California. It was later recovered. Make sure your tandems Are set properly (6th hole) I hear DOT drives the highways and byways specifically checking for that. Stay out of the left lanes and mind the speed limit. There is a TA on I-10 just east (1 exit)) of I-15 that has decent food and large parking but make sure you get there early as it fills up fast

And above all enjoy the ride and the 'seat covers'

Peace

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
member avatar

Ah I10 and I15. Sounds like Barstow, CA, or was that I40 and I15? Hmmmm... Anyway, I used to live in Barstow years ago when I was stationed at Fort Irwin. Barstow seemed like a "trucker" town back then. Trucks were everywhere. I do remember the In 'n Out Burger at the west end of town there. Nice memories!

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ah I10 and I15. Sounds like Barstow, CA, or was that I40 and I15? Hmmmm... Anyway, I used to live in Barstow years ago when I was stationed at Fort Irwin. Barstow seemed like a "trucker" town back then. Trucks were everywhere. I do remember the In 'n Out Burger at the west end of town there. Nice memories!

I love that In N Out. I go there whenever I pass by. There's actually truck parking for about 10 trucks right behind the Del Taco next to the In N Out. And Barstow is I15/I40.

HeavyHauler's Comment
member avatar

Good luck driving through that communist state. I hate going and living in California.

Schism's Comment
member avatar

Ah I10 and I15. Sounds like Barstow, CA, or was that I40 and I15? Hmmmm... Anyway, I used to live in Barstow years ago when I was stationed at Fort Irwin. Barstow seemed like a "trucker" town back then. Trucks were everywhere. I do remember the In 'n Out Burger at the west end of town there. Nice memories!

I spent my entire military obligation [ other than Basic training and AIT ] at Ft Irwin . In the mid to late 80's Barstow was a truck stop ! Bah....now I have to go track down my pictures , you made me miss Mt Tiefort . Gotta love seeing snow on a mountain in the Mojave Desert , that always made me smile .

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

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Gratz on the 2800 mile load! That's awesome. But I have a question on the tire chains. Isn't the company supposed to provide the tire chains if you are going to be needing them? If so, would you be picking them up at a terminal close to where a pass is? Just wondering...

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Yes the company will be providing them. When you have the chains you keep them on the truck, you don't give them back. It's your responsibility to make sure you have the required amount and you will be picking them up from a terminal. Pick them up first thing don't wait. If you don't have chains you don't move because even though you might not need them yet, you are still required to have them on your truck in most states. The chains you receive you will keep for a long time. My goal this winter is to never chain up. I won't drive if it ever gets that bad. Safety first.

That may be true for most companies, but Prime requires even their company drivers to buy chains, load locks, tarps, etc. It seems some time back, someone (or somebodies) ruined it for everyone by selling their equipment, then claiming they were stolen.

As usual, the few ruin it for the many.

Ernie

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

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Gratz on the 2800 mile load! That's awesome. But I have a question on the tire chains. Isn't the company supposed to provide the tire chains if you are going to be needing them? If so, would you be picking them up at a terminal close to where a pass is? Just wondering...

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Yes the company will be providing them. When you have the chains you keep them on the truck, you don't give them back. It's your responsibility to make sure you have the required amount and you will be picking them up from a terminal. Pick them up first thing don't wait. If you don't have chains you don't move because even though you might not need them yet, you are still required to have them on your truck in most states. The chains you receive you will keep for a long time. My goal this winter is to never chain up. I won't drive if it ever gets that bad. Safety first.

double-quotes-end.png

That may be true for most companies, but Prime requires even their company drivers to buy chains, load locks, tarps, etc. It seems some time back, someone (or somebodies) ruined it for everyone by selling their equipment, then claiming they were stolen.

As usual, the few ruin it for the many.

Ernie

WHAT!! No way. Are you serious? So if a receiver forgets to return my load locks that were in the trainer that means ill have to buy them myself? What's the prices go for?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Britton R.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Gratz on the 2800 mile load! That's awesome. But I have a question on the tire chains. Isn't the company supposed to provide the tire chains if you are going to be needing them? If so, would you be picking them up at a terminal close to where a pass is? Just wondering...

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Yes the company will be providing them. When you have the chains you keep them on the truck, you don't give them back. It's your responsibility to make sure you have the required amount and you will be picking them up from a terminal. Pick them up first thing don't wait. If you don't have chains you don't move because even though you might not need them yet, you are " class="blockquoteImageAfter">

That may be true for most companies, but Prime requires even their company drivers to buy chains, load locks, tarps, etc. It seems some time back, someone (or somebodies) ruined it for everyone by selling their equipment, then claiming they were stolen.

As usual, the few ruin it for the many.

Ernie

double-quotes-end.png

WHAT!! No way. Are you serious? So if a receiver forgets to return my load locks that were in the trainer that means ill have to buy them myself? What's the prices go for?

Yeah, its messed up. We get to a shipper to get a load to drop at the terminal which will then be picked up and taken to mexico. The shipper puts our load locks in and we lose them because of it. Then we hope to get credited to get them replaced. Happens often. They cost $35-45.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Load locks are $20/used, $40/new at the Prime terminals. If you have to buy them at the truck stop, usual going rate is $50 or more.

Bummer that it is like that, but like I said earlier, the few ruined it for everyone a while back. Because of number of drivers & cost, in a way I can't blame them. My opinion is the driver should be issued said equipment at the beginning, if they lose them along the way, they pay for them. It should not be as it is, but that is the facts as they are. Did not say I agree, just have to play by the rules as they are. Their game, their rules.

Ernie

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

ThinksTooMuch's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the tips lol. I figured I'd get chains before heading out, just in case. I know that a lot of states require you to have them on the truck in the winter months. I can pick them up at certain Schneider terminals, we don't have to buy them on our own.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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