How Has The YouTube Generation Changed Trucking???

Topic 19041 | Page 4

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desperado's Comment
member avatar

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Too bad the cpm hasn't really changed since the 90s either, lol

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Yeah, unfortunately that's pretty much true also. If I remember right I started at like 33 cpm on my first day solo in '93 and was bumped up to 36 cpm after 3 months or something like that. Not much different than most companies today when you consider a quarter of a century has passed.

sorry, but those numbers have been driving me crazy. it wasn't until 96 when JB Hunt shook up the industry and raised their starting pay up a dime to above 30cpm with at least a year experience. the rest of the industry follow suit. I remember that very clearly mega carriers were losing drivers left and right to go to JB..

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
sorry, but those numbers have been driving me crazy. it wasn't until 96 when JB Hunt shook up the industry and raised their starting pay up a dime to above 30cpm with at least a year experience. the rest of the industry follow suit. I remember that very clearly mega carriers were losing drivers left and right to go to JB..

I started in '93 and I remember I made almost $40,000 in my first full year on the road. There's no way I could have done that if the wages were in the low 20 cpm range. I think they were in the low 30 cpm range in the early 90's. I remember one guy from CR England telling me he was at 25 cpm and I couldn't believe how low that was compared to the other major carriers.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
desperado's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

sorry, but those numbers have been driving me crazy. it wasn't until 96 when JB Hunt shook up the industry and raised their starting pay up a dime to above 30cpm with at least a year experience. the rest of the industry follow suit. I remember that very clearly mega carriers were losing drivers left and right to go to JB..

double-quotes-end.png

I started in '93 and I remember I made almost $40,000 in my first full year on the road. There's no way I could have done that if the wages were in the low 20 cpm range. I think they were in the low 30 cpm range in the early 90's. I remember one guy from CR England telling me he was at 25 cpm and I couldn't believe how low that was compared to the other major carriers.

I started in 96 made 21.5cpm solo off my trainers truck DTI and I know other companies like BMC paid that too for otr ... that fall they raised their starting pay with experience to 28cpm because of JB's pay package.. I called payroll and they said I didn't qualify for that raise with only 3 months experience.. in 97 I broke 30cpm with Henderson on a regional fleet with 32cpm. Not saying your wrong but it's hard for me swallow any company paying that much for newbie back then...js

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
desperado's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

sorry, but those numbers have been driving me crazy. it wasn't until 96 when JB Hunt shook up the industry and raised their starting pay up a dime to above 30cpm with at least a year experience. the rest of the industry follow suit. I remember that very clearly mega carriers were losing drivers left and right to go to JB..

double-quotes-end.png

I started in '93 and I remember I made almost $40,000 in my first full year on the road. There's no way I could have done that if the wages were in the low 20 cpm range. I think they were in the low 30 cpm range in the early 90's. I remember one guy from CR England telling me he was at 25 cpm and I couldn't believe how low that was compared to the other major carriers.

did you consider extra pay and maybe school reimbursements part of your first years salary. I also did some research and your first company GTS was known for being an outlaw company with out speed limiters...js

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
did you consider extra pay and maybe school reimbursements part of your first years salary. I also did some research and your first company GTS was known for being an outlaw company without speed limiters...js

No, school reimbursements were not part of it. Extra pay would still be considered pay, like extra stops and things like that, but we didn't have much of that kind of stuff. It was just straightforward OTR dry van.

Gainey may have had that reputation way back in the day, but I never knew about it, and that was before my time. Our trucks were governed at 65 and I averaged around 3,000 - 3,200 miles per week once I got the hang of things.

I want to say the pay was like 32 or 33 cpm , something like that.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
member avatar

There are some helpful tubers out there but they're few are far between, one such tuber is Mark Staite.

"Getting on a trainers truck" https://youtu.be/WyaFhM5D_m8

Cantankerous Amicus's Comment
member avatar

Not hardly! Look guys, how many of you, when too tired to drive, will purposely set up your video equipment and get the sound all working just the way you want it so that you can record a phone call with your driver manager , and then use carefully chosen words, like "Micro-sleep" in your discussion so that you can completely set up a fake situation to make your company look bad?

Thanks for the link, Old School. I have been meaning to look that one up after seeing his name dropped in passing here a few times while reading through various threads. A number of people here on TT also saw the same holes in his story. I didn't see any of them when the came out years ago because I hadn't yet done as much research into the trucking lifestyle.

Re: Setting up video equipment - It's crazy how many people do just that sort of thing, once one gives it a bit of thought. Big time emotional manipulation, and easy to spot once you start looking for it.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
A number of people here on TT also saw the same holes in his story.

When you've been in trucking for a long time and you know the way a lot of these drivers "think," if you can call it that, it's easy to spot these types. I could tell 20 seconds into the video what I was about to see and that the whole thing was a setup to cover up this guy's failures and inadequacies.

There are two types of people in the world:

  • Those who understand that in order to have success at a high level you must focus relentlessly on making yourself better. These people know that the only limit to their success is their own performance.
  • Those who never have much success at anything because they don't focus on making themselves better, but instead believe that everyone around them is to blame for their failures.

If you look at all of the advice you hear about trucking through this light it becomes instantly apparent that there's a fantastic group of us here at Trucking Truth who focus relentlessly on helping people understand what they have to do to make themselves successful, while the overwhelming majority of what you'll find anywhere else is people warning you about all of the ways that trucking companies and the trucking industry are going to be the cause of your failures.

Never take advice from people who constantly issue dire warnings and simply want to complain and blame and criticize others. Look instead for people who will help you understand what you have to do to become good enough to succeed at something.

No one ever wrote a book called, "How To Complain And Blame Your Way To Success"

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
member avatar

No one ever wrote a book called, "How To Complain And Blame Your Way To Success"

Love that ending lol

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