Perspective: How Important Are Truck Drivers To Easter In America?

Topic 19124 | Page 1

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The Highlight Reel's Comment
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Americans, obviously, like their stuff. The entire world knows it. Especially at holiday time, where by some accounts we seemingly take every opportunity and make any excuse to increase our consumption of various consumer goods.

That's not to say that the reason and spirit for the season is lost on people, by any means, as millions of Christians are celebrating the Resurrection, but the various traditions, rituals and accessories at Easter time also require truckloads and truckloads of physical stock to support it. It is during these times of high consumption that we like to remind the General Public just how important the trucking industry is.

Must of this holiday consumption is food-related, in the form of holiday meals, eggs and candy, and every time you turn around, another brand is coming up with more specialized themed products, like the pastel M&M's and Reese's Peanut Butter Eggs. Around one-third of the estimated $18.4 billion spent on Easter-related retail sales in 2017 will be on food. With around 88% of American parents doing up Easter baskets for their children, here's some Easter by the numbers:

  • Colored Easter Eggs:

    Americans color and dye about 180 million eggs every year. That's around 4.5 billion hen-hours.

  • Jelly Beans:

    A staple of Easter candy-buying since the 1930's, about 16 billion are sold every year. With 8 standard flavor combinations, and about 50 other specialty flavors, they used to be sold by color. So they're probably still trying to get rid of the black ones.

  • Cadbury Creme Eggs:

    Love them or hate them, the mysterious chocolate-covered treats first made in 1971 are as popular as ever, with 500 million consumed at Easter.

  • Peeps:

    Not to be outdone, Easter's other divisive candy, Peeps, sell about 700 million per year. Whatever your take on the oddly-textured Peeps, or your preference in pizza toppings, do not do this. Ever:

    0754247001492022091.jpeg

Another $2.9 billion will be used on Easter gifts, while $3.3 billion will be spent on clothing, and another $3 billion for flowers, decorations, and greeting cards. The effective bottom line of all of this is that record amounts of consumer goods need to be moved from place-to-place, as always.

“Shoppers will find promotions on a number of items on their lists, from Easter baskets to sports equipment, home goods, garden tools and more.”

~ NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay

Other fun Easter stats:

  • Easter Cards:

    Still quite popular, despite electronic alternatives, we send about 43 million per year.

  • Egg Hunts:

    Winter Haven, FL boasts the largest in the country, with almost 10,000 children searching for over 500,000 eggs every year.

  • Chocolate Bunnies:

    90 million chocolate bunnies are produced every year. About 76% of consumers say that the ears should be eaten first. The other 24% are split between the feet, tail, and "other" just to spite them.

External Links:

National Retail Federation Says Later Easter Expected To Bring Record Spending

Sweet Easter Facts

Easter by the Numbers

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Dear God. Whoever craeted that Peeps pizza abomination should be stoned...or maybe they already were. Either way, just looking at it makes me wanna dry heave. 🤢

Greg M.'s Comment
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My first job out of college was as a line haul dispatcher at a long gone ltl company, McLean Trucking. One of our customers made the plastic "Easter Grass" that you put in the kids baskets.They would compress it some but a full trailer would still barely move the scale.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

My first job out of college was as a line haul dispatcher at a long gone ltl company, McLean Trucking. One of our customers made the plastic "Easter Grass" that you put in the kids baskets.They would compress it some but a full trailer would still barely move the scale.

McLean? They went bust when, ...30 years ago? I don't remember exactly...

Wow...one of the original common carrier pioneers of intermodal and a couple of related spin-offs if memory serves me correctly.

Back to Easter...one of the many eating holidays that creates an intensity of workload for grocery drivers and an opportunity to make some very healthy paychecks. Nothing like the month leading up to Christmas and New Years, none the less, I'll take it though.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Greg M.'s Comment
member avatar

The ltl business shut down less than a year after I started in the mid 80s. A lot shut down around then due to deregulation.

Funny thing was that I grew up around my family's trucking business and had been driving class b dump trucks, pulling low boys and dump trailers since before I was 18. Had the old pre-cdl Ohio chauffeurs license. First weekend they had one of the yard guys take the "college kid" out and show him how to hook up a trailer. He asked me if I wanted to try and drive. I played dumb and said sure. We get into a GMC Brigadier with a 10 speed and take off down the access road to where the loaded vans were. I take off double clutching away and even popped the button and get it into 6th and I can see him looking at me funny out of the corner of my eye. He points out the trailer and when I lined it up perfectly without looking out the daycab window he knew he had been had and busted out laughing.

We probably had about 200 drivers at that terminal and within 24 hours they all had heard the story.

double-quotes-start.png

My first job out of college was as a line haul dispatcher at a long gone ltl company, McLean Trucking. One of our customers made the plastic "Easter Grass" that you put in the kids baskets.They would compress it some but a full trailer would still barely move the scale.

double-quotes-end.png

McLean? They went bust when, ...30 years ago? I don't remember exactly...

Wow...one of the original common carrier pioneers of intermodal and a couple of related spin-offs if memory serves me correctly.

Back to Easter...one of the many eating holidays that creates an intensity of workload for grocery drivers and an opportunity to make some very healthy paychecks. Nothing like the month leading up to Christmas and New Years, none the less, I'll take it though.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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