Truck Stops Vs. Rest Areas

Topic 19942 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

I'm starting to formulate my own opinion on the matter but would like to hear from others.

That being said I'm leaning towards favoring rest areas for the DOT 10's.

What do you think? What works for you and why?

Thanks in advance for your input.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

To qualify question: Theses choices are secondary to overnight parking at shipper / receiver or creative parking when available and necessary.

I'm starting to formulate my own opinion on the matter but would like to hear from others.

That being said I'm leaning towards favoring rest areas for the DOT 10's.

What do you think? What works for you and why?

Thanks in advance for your input.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Depends on what state and what time you shut down. Also some are "no facilities" or "limited facilities" meaning no vending machines, and possibly a porta pot or no restroom at all...just a parking lot.

Some have spaces others are curb parking...some fit 8 trucks others fit 80. Try one in VA at midnight and you will get jammed in and not be able to get out...try one in WI and there's tons open.

At least everyone goes in one direction, unlike truck stops... But many get closed for renovations in the summer so relying on one is a bad idea. Always plan with a list of various parking options

Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Yeah what ^ she said. TS you'll always have access to food, water, restrooms, showers etc. plus if you need to do any minor repairs you'll have access to supplies and parts.

David's Comment
member avatar

I favor rest areas over TS... I like the feeling of sleeping in "nature" when at a rest area.. there are some really nice ones out there. for example, i5 in Dunnigan, CA has/had? a rest area that was surrounded by trees, couldn't really see the highway. one of my favorite place's to stop when in the area. its been awhile though, not sure if it's still operational. I try to avoid TS's except for fuel and i'll shower on my 30min break. now if a TS is like within 50mi of a stop and there's now rest areas, then i'll stop at the TS but park as far away from other trucks as i can. i dread having to back between two refers... =D

Kat's Comment
member avatar

I prefer rest areas over truck stops. Less crowded, easier parking and usually quieter!

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It all depends. Location, time you shut down etc. In the last week I've slept at 2 shippers, 1 rest area, 1 truck stop, 1 mom n pop stop creative parking and 2 nights at a company terminal.

I don't need a lot.. I cook my own meals. So just need some basic facilities and access to a shower at a minimum of every other day or I'll just shower on a 30+ minute break. I do like quite a few rest areas, but no shower. Love Ohio turnpike service plazas.. they have SHOWERS!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

I actually prefer rest areas, Ohio has a lot of nice ones as well as 87 in upstate NY. Or if I do the ts thing i try and find mom and pop places to stop at. Already have a few im looking at in West Virginia tomorrow if I can actually make it to them. And for the love of peacefulness turn your jakes off while entering or driving around either areas, please, lol.

Unholychaos's Comment
member avatar

TS if I start early enough in the day to be guaranteed a spot. After a long day, I'd rather not have to stress about backing in between 2 other trucks at 2200 with minimal lighting. It's so much easier, quicker, and more importantly safer to just huddle up at a rest area. But if it's only curb parking, I pray that I get there early enough that I can just pull up behind the guy in front. I can't parallel back to save my life. Especially in some of those extremely narrow rest areas with curb parking on both sides.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick Dees's Comment
member avatar

It depends..if you can park at a shipper or receiver that is always best because you can save your clock. I like rest areas the best but they are not always the most convenient. Ohio has some awesome travel plazas. Often when you get in the eastern half of the US if you don't find a parking place by 6pm you are going to start to have a tough time.. if the big name truck stops are full always look for the mom and pop ones..usually there is parking there..sometimes you have to get creative .

Don't forget walmart..a lot of those have parking areas. You will find out west it's a lot easier to find parking..wide open spaces and big lots. I dread going back down south, especially Florida..very tough finding parking there..and getting outta there..that's another story. Good Luck!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More