Local Food Service As A Rookie

Topic 20873 | Page 6

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Rob T.'s Comment
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0516950001515201423.jpg my trailer was loaded clear to the tail. I was very happy to see it was a dock stop when I had opened my door up. I still had to wheel it into the kitchen but I atleast had a dock to stand on instead of pulling ramp out halfway and stacking on that, climbing down and stacking it onto my dolly. It's irritating but we're trying to maximize the space we have. They took 3 whole pallets, 165 cases or so. Took roughly an hour to unload that stop.

Rob T.'s Comment
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0336318001515201720.jpg this is an example of one of the alleys I had to go through. Last week I pulled through from what you're looking at. This is the one i had to "S" through. It is only 1 lane each direction for traffic, with parking on both sides of the street. I was swinging wide and started to angle in i realized I wouldn't be able to make it in without hitting the side of the building or a car. There were cars parked much closer to the alley this week than last week. I had to back up, keeping track of where cars were in order to get back out and go around the block. I ended up going into the alley on the other end and backing across a street into this section of the alley so I could deliver my product. I absolutely avoid backing up onto the street when I can't see but i didn't have any alternatives. Of course while this is happening cars continue to drive behind me despite me having half the road and still backing. I had a few people blaring their horns at me...but it is what it is. They can deal with it. To be any kind of driver you need to have thick skin. That's especially true being local. The customers will try to push you around, and the motoring public would. I'm Not saying be a jerk, or intentionally **** people off but you can't let others dictate what your doing.

Rob T.'s Comment
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0385519001515202284.jpg

This is the one that really gave me a hard time last week. Remember I said I got in a rush and went through knowing it's Tight? Well this time i went through where I'd have more space. That's right....i have more space on the side of my trailer in this pic than i had last week.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

0228986001515202454.jpg

This is how I had to exit, I went to the right, (the way I came in last week) and had to avoid a car parked across the street. The tree branches on the right are part of a tree that the trunk is only a couple feet out of frame. I am very thankful I only have a PUP trailer instead of trying to fit a 48 or 53 in these places. Not every place we deliver to is as tight as these pictures show, there are quite a few stops that don't require us to back, we just pull up and unload. Those pics would be boring, and I feel it would be doing a disservice to anybody considering this sector and put it into their head that backing, and close quarter manuerving isn't a factor

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Had a run that took me out to Omaha, and Lincoln NE today. 450 cases,402 miles, 10k pounds and 14 hours, 8 stops. I really don't mind that route, keeps me moving and it's nice to get out on I80 with nothing around. It was 32 in Des Moines when I left, roads were just wet. Got out MM 50 or so and the fog was setting in. Temp out there (and in omaha) was only 21 so the roads were icing up and I had to slow down. Not much i can do about that, I just had to pick the pace up with unloading, after throwing some salt down of course. When I headed out to Lincoln it had warmed up to low 40's so ice wasn't a concern. I had 2 stops in downtown Lincoln. I have to deliver from the street for the first stop.

0647107001515459631.jpg

It's a little scary coming down that ramp while cars are coming fast towards you. I made it out there before lunch and the customer was very happy

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

As a way of saying thank you, they made me some lunch

0360773001515459728.jpg It took me longer than I expected to get unloaded and ended up having to sit there to take lunch on the street.

I was supposed to be off tomorrow but another driver has the flu so I'm stuck working it :(

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Last night I didn't clock out until just before 530 am Despite my truck being there sometime before 3am I wasn't able to get started until 330am when my hours were available. As I said in my last post I was supposed to be off today but because another driver has the flu I got stuck working my day off. Although we technically only work 4 days they expect us to be "on call" which I'm not too thrilled about, since we aren't paid extra to do so. I was looking forward to taking the kids out to the park today since it's supposed to warm up to low 40's and now I have had to bust my tail to get done early enough for it to be possible. I ended up having to wait around for customers this morning for a total of about an hour and a half, and I'm still running an hour and a half ahead of schedule. The time I spent waiting I organized my trailer the best I could so it wasn't completely wasted time. Spent my morning running around Des Moines, my last 5 stops are in Ankeny (just north of Des moines). 450 cases, 10k pounds, 15 stops, I'll put in about 12 hours, and drive maybe 90 miles. Although I'd prefer to have had the day off I'll end up making $400 or so in overtime for today.

Biggest downside about filling in on another drivers route is his customers are accustomed to how he does things, and he's willing to separate their stuff and put it away. I refuse to do that because it isn't part of my job. Problem is they're used to him doing it so they get moody at me when I tell them no. I ran this route for 6 weeks when i was in training so I know where everything is (except 1 new stop), and know the best way to set up. This route only has 3 places I had to back near other vehicles, or other obstacles. 2 of which I jack knifed in the street/parking lot to place my ramp on the sidewalk so I didn't have to pull my ramp up the curb. The other place I backed at was because I didn't want to go up steps, instead I backed up and angled the truck in a position that allowed me to place my ramp at the top of stairs. I had set off an alarm at a customer today. Some customers give us a key and their alarm code so we can deliver without anybody present, and so they can have it as soon as they get there. I day fingered the keys and ended up setting it off. Sat around 20 minutes after i finished in case police responded which they did not.

I have 7(?) Stops I was able to just pull up and unload, no backing necessary. I also am running paper logs because the peoplenet in this truck is down, and we're waiting on a replacement. Make sure you understand how to do paper logs although ELOGS are now legally required. Never know when ELOG may go down.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Last night I didn't clock out until just before 530 am Despite my truck being there sometime before 3am I wasn't able to get started until 330am when my hours were available. As I said in my last post I was supposed to be off today but because another driver has the flu I got stuck working my day off. Although we technically only work 4 days they expect us to be "on call" which I'm not too thrilled about, since we aren't paid extra to do so. I was looking forward to taking the kids out to the park today since it's supposed to warm up to low 40's and now I have had to bust my tail to get done early enough for it to be possible. I ended up having to wait around for customers this morning for a total of about an hour and a half, and I'm still running an hour and a half ahead of schedule. The time I spent waiting I organized my trailer the best I could so it wasn't completely wasted time. Spent my morning running around Des Moines, my last 5 stops are in Ankeny (just north of Des moines). 450 cases, 10k pounds, 15 stops, I'll put in about 12 hours, and drive maybe 90 miles. Although I'd prefer to have had the day off I'll end up making $400 or so in overtime for today.

Biggest downside about filling in on another drivers route is his customers are accustomed to how he does things, and he's willing to separate their stuff and put it away. I refuse to do that because it isn't part of my job. Problem is they're used to him doing it so they get moody at me when I tell them no. I ran this route for 6 weeks when i was in training so I know where everything is (except 1 new stop), and know the best way to set up. This route only has 3 places I had to back near other vehicles, or other obstacles. 2 of which I jack knifed in the street/parking lot to place my ramp on the sidewalk so I didn't have to pull my ramp up the curb. The other place I backed at was because I didn't want to go up steps, instead I backed up and angled the truck in a position that allowed me to place my ramp at the top of stairs. I had set off an alarm at a customer today. Some customers give us a key and their alarm code so we can deliver without anybody present, and so they can have it as soon as they get there. I day fingered the keys and ended up setting it off. Sat around 20 minutes after i finished in case police responded which they did not.

I have 7(?) Stops I was able to just pull up and unload, no backing necessary. I also am running paper logs because the peoplenet in this truck is down, and we're waiting on a replacement. Make sure you understand how to do paper logs although ELOGS are now legally required. Never know when ELOG may go down.

That was supposed to say 530 PM

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I had post that other update while I was on lunch. My last stop of the day I had delivered to a place I've gone numerous times. It's connected to a fast food restaurant so to stay out of the Way I always park in their employee lot. I underestimated how much room I needed to whip a U-turn and got myself into quite the pickle. Here is a pic of where i tried the U turn.

0681307001515534532.jpg Usually the last car on each side isn't there and I have had plenty of success getting it turned around in there. Apparently that little extra space makes a HUGE difference. I had to jack knife several times attempting to wiggle out without hitting anything. In the end I ended up going partially on the grass. Pretty sure I had to G.O.A.L. 20 times, and it took over 10 minutes of shimmying it to finally get out. I was embarassed....but I did it safely without hitting anything. I also had jack knifed it so hard I probably had 3 inches between the side of my trailer and my day can.

Han Solo Cup's Comment
member avatar

I’d be more embarrassed to damage something. Anyone laughing at you for GOALing 20ish times is more than welcome to show you how it’s done. Haha.

Regarding the filling in, it sucks but imagine how cruddy that sick driver is feeling. He’s not only sick but probably feels bad someone has to cover his route. And those customers that expect you to do the little extras he normally does should understand you’re not him. Just like you have to adapt to his route and customers, they need to adapt to you. Just do your thing.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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