Packing For Swift Duffle Or Suitcase ?

Topic 21723 | Page 2

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Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

One of my students brought 5 large duffles, a sleeping bag and pillow. Their stuff literally covered the when top bunk. They had the nerve to complain about the lack of space I'd provided for them. I gave them a cabinet space and room in both my refrigerator and the onboard refrigerator (that's right, I have two, lol), and I also let them store drinks in my personal ice cooler.

Ok, that was just an example of what not to do, or bring. 5 large duffles, waayyy to much stuff. I mean, come on, the whole top bunk. And they weighed a ton each.

Any student of mine will never go without water. I will not provide for them but, I will make sure that they at least survive the trip.

I'd prepare to sleep with your stuff. I just measured, never have b4. The top bunk is approx. 2 1/2 feet by 6 1/2 feet. And, unless you are a very large person, or very tall, you can put stuff at the foot of, and sides of the bed space.

One of my students would take their stuff down and put it in the passengers seat while they slept. This was fine. They were a rather large person.

Hey, we don't live in a perfect world. Even though I do believe that trainers should provide a little space, they will not always do so. And, I personally only provide so much space. One reason is because, I have no idea how long you will be on my truck. 2 days, 2 weeks, who knows, I've had both. If I provide all of this extra space for you, then it takes away from space I could have used for myself. I'd have to purchase more stuff out on the road.

So, prepare for the worst case scenario and only bring what you can fit into that 2 1/2 feet by 6 1/2 feet space, including yourself.

Regards....

Big T's Comment
member avatar

Are you going dry or reefer? Good luck. Im sitting there now. I deliver around the corner in a few hours

Thank you Big T and Bruce K. I appreciate your responses.

I may see you around Big T. I'm with Swift and Jurupa Valley will be my home terminal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

One of my students brought 5 large duffles, a sleeping bag and pillow. Their stuff literally covered the when top bunk. They had the nerve to complain about the lack of space I'd provided for them. I gave them a cabinet space and room in both my refrigerator and the onboard refrigerator (that's right, I have two, lol), and I also let them store drinks in my personal ice cooler.

Ok, that was just an example of what not to do, or bring. 5 large duffles, waayyy to much stuff. I mean, come on, the whole top bunk. And they weighed a ton each.

Any student of mine will never go without water. I will not provide for them but, I will make sure that they at least survive the trip.

I'd prepare to sleep with your stuff. I just measured, never have b4. The top bunk is approx. 2 1/2 feet by 6 1/2 feet. And, unless you are a very large person, or very tall, you can put stuff at the foot of, and sides of the bed space.

One of my students would take their stuff down and put it in the passengers seat while they slept. This was fine. They were a rather large person.

Hey, we don't live in a perfect world. Even though I do believe that trainers should provide a little space, they will not always do so. And, I personally only provide so much space. One reason is because, I have no idea how long you will be on my truck. 2 days, 2 weeks, who knows, I've had both. If I provide all of this extra space for you, then it takes away from space I could have used for myself. I'd have to purchase more stuff out on the rroad.

So, prepare for the worst case scenario and only bring what you can fit into that 2 1/2 feet by 6 1/2 feet space, including yourself.

Regards....

Thanks for your input Greg H.

That's crazy. Why would anyone need to bring that much stuff. Unless they literally brought all their belongings. I brought enough clothes to last 2 weeks w/o having to do laundry. Factoring in, wearing pants 2-3 days. Everything else is set for a daily change. Food and drinks will wittle down daily. I'm 5'10" and am skinny. I should be fine with everything on my bunk.

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

Are you going dry or reefer? Good luck. Im sitting there now. I deliver around the corner in a few hours

double-quotes-start.png

Thank you Big T and Bruce K. I appreciate your responses.

I may see you around Big T. I'm with Swift and Jurupa Valley will be my home terminal.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm not sure if I'll be dry van or reefer with my trainer. I get what I get. As long as they smoke, I don't care really. I have to go to the DMV tomorrow since I tested Saturday. Then I'll know what's up a couple hours later.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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