GPS Dependancy Is Bad

Topic 22864 | Page 2

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TommyGun's Comment
member avatar

Valuble tool; shouldn't solely rely on it.

I have a Rand McNally Atlas, a Truckstop Atlas, Google Maps, and a backup Truck GPS if/when the Qualcomm fails.

If its a route I'm very familiar with, sometimes I don't even bother with the GPS.

Still do turn by turn analog in NYC and other clustered metropolitan areas. GPS simply doesn't work in those areas.

With the interstate driver, there is absolutely no excuse. He had plenty of external warnings before he even got to the beach.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

I agree with most things. There's one thing I forgot to mention and one I completely dropped the ball with...

One, we get written directions on the QC, along with a "fuel solution" for suggested fuel stops. First I write down the pay#, the miles, shipper , pick up date/time, consgnee, drop off date/time, and other relevant data o may need. And on back of that paper, I write down the written directions that planning sends us. I didn't mention written directions because its just routine information that I really couldn't do anything else without - I just assumed everyone did it the same way. Both of my trainers showed me essentially the same way to write this info down in case the QC died. Maybe it's just a company trend of doing it this way.

But where I really dropped the ball was the advice about calling the places I'm headed... Worse, I've read it at least twice, from Brett's Book and from an article he wrote, Rookie Drivers: Time Management Tips And Mileage Goals.

I read both of those and thought to myself, now that's some damn good advice. Yet, it still doesn't occur to me put that wisdom into use. That's really sad on my part. Having great information and putting that information to use are clearly two different things. One means you can read and one means you can think!

But once again I stand by having a full toolbox - including GPS. It's not the ultimate tool, but it has helped a few times lately very nicely.

As for electronics being able to fail, etc. Well, I'm a big believer in that.
0455012001530900019.jpg

That's a little notebook called Write-in-the-Rain. It's pretty waterproof. And it sits in my wallet with phone numbers, addresses, and other important info from my phone - written down just in case something happens to my phone.

Not trying to be a smartass with that. Just wanted to point out that I believe electronic things can fail and I believe in writing things down. 😀

As for not using the advice about calling places... Yeah, I simply have no excuse. That was just poor performance on my part. And I will remedy that soon!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
TommyGun's Comment
member avatar

I agree with most things. There's one thing I forgot to mention and one I completely dropped the ball with...

One, we get written directions on the QC, along with a "fuel solution" for suggested fuel stops. First I write down the pay#, the miles, shipper , pick up date/time, consgnee, drop off date/time, and other relevant data o may need. And on back of that paper, I write down the written directions that planning sends us. I didn't mention written directions because its just routine information that I really couldn't do anything else without - I just assumed everyone did it the same way. Both of my trainers showed me essentially the same way to write this info down in case the QC died. Maybe it's just a company trend of doing it this way.

But where I really dropped the ball was the advice about calling the places I'm headed... Worse, I've read it at least twice, from Brett's Book and from an article he wrote, Rookie Drivers: Time Management Tips And Mileage Goals.

I read both of those and thought to myself, now that's some damn good advice. Yet, it still doesn't occur to me put that wisdom into use. That's really sad on my part. Having great information and putting that information to use are clearly two different things. One means you can read and one means you can think!

But once again I stand by having a full toolbox - including GPS. It's not the ultimate tool, but it has helped a few times lately very nicely.

As for electronics being able to fail, etc. Well, I'm a big believer in that.
0455012001530900019.jpg

That's a little notebook called Write-in-the-Rain. It's pretty waterproof. And it sits in my wallet with phone numbers, addresses, and other important info from my phone - written down just in case something happens to my phone.

Not trying to be a smartass with that. Just wanted to point out that I believe electronic things can fail and I believe in writing things down. 😀

As for not using the advice about calling places... Yeah, I simply have no excuse. That was just poor performance on my part. And I will remedy that soon!

To be fair, sometimes you'll get bad advice even from the Shipper/Reciever.

I call them on occassion, when it looks tricky, or when Google Satelite imagery isn't very clear on how I get into/out of shipper/reciever.

Even then, its advice I put in the back of my mind. (Okay, thats what THEY said, but we'll see.)

I use a hard backed journal to keep my active loads, fuel stops, weight, pcs, seal #, etc.

Instead of looking at the bills over and over for reference, I use my load book to keep correct references. As for turn by turn handwritten instructions, as stated above, I only do that when its tricky, unknown, or a heavy metropolitian area.

Like going to Hunts Point. Been there several times. I go 95 GWB, 87 Maj Deegan, Exit 1 Brook, Bruckner, Leggett, Randall, Food Center.

I have every turn memorized into and out of that place.

...I still look at the turn by turn, directions and verify my route via Google Maps. NYC is a place I hate going to, so I don't screw around.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, if you are aware of your surroundings and reading the signs, then this shouldn't happen. If your GPS is leading you into a lake and you follow it, you're an idiot. Common sense can work wonders out here, as well as knowing how to use all of your tools.

I always check the atlas for any road that is not an interstate. I will also zoom in on Google maps and look for trucks on the road I am taking. Lastly, i will go to street view and scan the area for low clearances and any questionable turns.

After all that is done I still have had to abandon a specific road or turn once I see it with my own eyes. Nothing can replace what you have or dont have between your ears. At that point, just take it slow and pay attention. Put your flashers on if you have to so others know you are all jacked up at the moment lol.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dustan J.'s Comment
member avatar

I use mine and keep it updated. I generally use my trucker's atlas for the planning and the GPS gives me a heads up for construction or for turns in unfamiliar places, like in towns. Now, there is one thing that made me crazy....the stupid thing has told me that addresses or even entire towns didn't exist! Rand McNally TND is the one I was given as a gift. It pulls weather data if you tether it to a phone, and that is handy if it is warning you about something on your route. I usually just run the dashboard setting because I'm nerdy about sunset/sunrise and elevation data, and the route runs in the background until I need it. Overall, I find it to be rather inferior to the good ol' trucker atlas as far as the routes are concerned, unless the haul is pretty far and I want to do something really specific in an unfamiliar area. For example, I somehow got off track in the mountains near Umatilla, OR and pulled a Maxi flatbed loaded with lumber through a forest for 4 hours on a state highway (I was still legal) and had to make it back out to the interstate. It was handy because some of the road signs weren't entirely obvious. Great teaching moment for me, and pretty embarrassing.

What I do like to do is to use Google Maps with the satellite view to locate the address, and progressively zoom out to track a truck route to wherever I need to be. It's a preliminary reconnaissance tool that can answer some questions if you need it, and you most likely will at some point because you don't always get a knowledgeable person picking up the phone. The nice thing about that is that you will usually see trucks on there since the photos are shot around midday in most instances, and there isn't much guess work left once you are seeing the designated routes with the trucks on them. Portland, OR and Seattle are a couple places that come to mind when I think "confusing roads" because you have to cross waterways and the roads to reach those bridges might not be entirely easy to work out. One shipper was located UNDER a bridge, and they were shipping steel coils to Montana.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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