My Experience Through Past Two Years And How DAC Smacked Me

Topic 22980 | Page 1

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Stephen S.'s Comment
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I have wanted to drive a tractor and trailer since 2006 I couldn't at the time because I had children under the age of ten. fast forward ten years I finally made it happen. I got my license through Celadon in Laredo TX went out with a trainer and the first thing he told me "all the stuff they taught you in training, forget it. That was to get you ready for the road test, I'm gonna get you ready for the road." our first load was from Laredo up to Nebraska and I took to the road like a fish to water. Out with my trainer showed me a lot more and I held on it.

Once the six weeks was up delayed because of mechanical issues should have been four I go back to Indiana where I was paired up with another driver with maybe three or four more months on the road than I. it was a rocky first two weeks, but after that we ran coast to coast and would kill it both of us doing 600 plus miles each we'd make it to the west coast in three and half days we didn't play we were about our bread. Everything was going well. that is until I had a totally preventable accident. May of 2016 my teammate went home. he lived K.C.M.O I dropped him off and was going to head to the nearest truck stop to take my break. stupid me and I do mean stupid instead of being in the left lane to make a right turn I was in the left lane, not thinking of the clearance I'd need for the trailer, I ripped the signal light off the pole. I reported it as you're supposed to and was directed back to Indiana where I was let go. A few days shy of my probationary period being done not that it mattered, but that was one of many things to happen while I was out on the road. Albeit I was crushed I'd made such a stupid mistake. I went home Dejected and discouraged.

Three months later I get on with Western Express not far from Nashville. I lasted three months there without incident I left because my teammate from Celadon who I'd become friends with had left them and had gotten on with Navajo Express I spoke to a recruiter while still driving for Western and they accepted my app so off I went to Colorado. I made it through orientation and my road test, I was confident but not ****y in my ability to handle and 18 wheeler by this point and all was well until I had another preventable accident in Long Island NY. I didn't have my own GPS so I used the one that was on the tom tom they didn't use qualcomm's it directed me to the Long Island ferry and suffice it to say i was a bit unhinged by this so now I have to make it back to the 495 and as I am trying to maneuver through a narrow block my offset clipped a geo tracker that was parked. I was beyond ****ed at myself for not being able to navigate better and it cost me a thousand dollars. I guess i got off cheap. I had a few more incidents all backing issues and altogether there were ten in eleven months, I should have been gone after four but they kept me on until the last one in October of 2017 then I was let go. I learned a lot about mountain driving through them so I could not be mad I just didn't Goat when I should have parking or backing into doors I didn't do major damage but it was enough for them to say we cant insure you anymore. I was still grateful for the experience.

My last company was out of my hometown NYC on Long Island and I think they only reason I got on with them was because Navajo hadn't put all these preventables on my DAC. I rolled with them up until June of this year with no incidents but they let me go and just said I was unreliable I was upset but I realized it wasn't all on me but thats how companies will spin it and you just let it go and keep moving. My love affair with the interstate was all I cared about, and of course being on time.

I didn't realize that Navajo had put all of the preventables on my dac so now I have to wait two years for them to fall out of the scope of companies that may hire me. Nobody will touch me now and I understand, that's how it works. I could look at all this and be bitter but what good is that? I either learn from my mistakes or keep repeating them. I guess I'll drive an Uber for now until I can get back on the road, and I will I just have to wait but I love driving and seeing the country and talking to people from different places with different views on life on the road. I'll get there again and I'll be vigilant of where I am and how i proceed because DAC has sidelined me for next two years and the only reason I found out because a recruiter from a company I had applied to was nice enough to read what was said about me. I appreciated it it also took the wind out of my sails I was used to being on the road. I lived in my truck. I will again unless something better happens in the meantime in between time waiting . Thanks for reading.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Stephen, welcome to out forum! I'm hoping you realize that DAC didn't "smack" you. C'mon man, you smacked yourself, and then kept on smacking yourself.

I had a few more incidents all backing issues and altogether there were ten in eleven months

That's not a record to be proud of, and then add on top of that what looks like three different jobs during your first year. You have really made it hard on yourself. To be honest with you, here's the shining star of hope in your post...

I either learn from my mistakes or keep repeating them.

That right there may salvage your career. That is if you seriously take that approach from this day forward. You'll have to start over completely in a few years. That means schooling, training, the whole nine yards - just like a total rookie. You can start now by being vigilant about keeping that license clean, and paying hyper attention to what's going on around you while your driving.

I wish the best for you man, but you've got to realize your responsibility in this mess. Forget about blaming DAC. This business is completely performance based. Unfortunately you didn't put up a very good performance during that critical first year introductory period.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

You can get a free copy of your DAC. Just Google it.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

I have all my incidents listed on my dac and it cost me getting a new job. Goes to show how serious the job is and something as little as a bent rim is a lot more serious than I thought. I have improved since such incidents and do what I can to keep them from happening again, any incident big or small should be avoided at all costs. There is a reason why they are called preventable.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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