Speaking Of Guaranteed Pay (Maverick)

Topic 23152 | Page 1

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Personally, I think guarantees in a pay for performance job is nuts.

Maverick is extending their guarantee to all divisions. Maybe they have qualifiers to prevent people from gaming the system

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Amish country's Comment
member avatar

We have a "guaranteed" pay of $750 but you can't have called out or refused a load, etc in order to qualify for it. For those just in case times when a quarry runs out of product, weather, basically anything out of your control. I'm sure they have some "qualifications" setup so it doesn't get abused by the lazy ones.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

They haven't given out the details yet, but we'd probably have to be available all 5 days (Monday through Friday), be on time, not hit stuff etc. I'm curious how they will factor in bonuses and tenure. I have over 2 years but I'm not topped out yet. The guarantee is only there to provide a safety net if they can't get things done on their end. If someone is lazy and is ok with 1000 a week then have at it. I'm sure there will be rules however.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

West Side Transport has had pay commitments for years. Here, you cannot refuse any loads, must not be late for any pickups or deliveries (that are your fault), no excessive breaks. The amount of the commitment depends on whether you're regional (home weekly) or network fleet (OTR), Regional must be available 5 days out of the week and network fleet must be available 7 days a week.

Honestly, if you do all those things, you'll always exceed the pay commitment, but it's nice if you happen to have a screwed up week through no fault of your own.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

They haven't given out the details yet, but we'd probably have to be available all 5 days (Monday through Friday), be on time, not hit stuff etc. I'm curious how they will factor in bonuses and tenure. I have over 2 years but I'm not topped out yet. The guarantee is only there to provide a safety net if they can't get things done on their end. If someone is lazy and is ok with 1000 a week then have at it. I'm sure there will be rules however.

When I spoke to them about glass, which has a minimum, they said you had to be available, take offered loads, etc. They probably know they have enough loads that they will rarely will have to pay it. :)

I know if I had offered a minimum to my salesmen, they would definitely get lazy, but then again, it wouldn't be the same as freight, where they already know what contracts they have in place. Mine was all walk in. The only guarantee we had was that you would be paid minimum wage for 40 hours (110 per week at the time), and I had a salesman that would never take any customers. He would sit in his office 12 hours a day and make 110/week. I fired him, and unemployment actually sided with him. He claimed he was depressed.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

West Side Transport has had pay commitments for years. Here, you cannot refuse any loads, must not be late for any pickups or deliveries (that are your fault), no excessive breaks. The amount of the commitment depends on whether you're regional (home weekly) or network fleet (OTR), Regional must be available 5 days out of the week and network fleet must be available 7 days a week.

Honestly, if you do all those things, you'll always exceed the pay commitment, but it's nice if you happen to have a screwed up week through no fault of your own.

That makes sense.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

West Side Transport has had pay commitments for years. Here, you cannot refuse any loads, must not be late for any pickups or deliveries (that are your fault), no excessive breaks. The amount of the commitment depends on whether you're regional (home weekly) or network fleet (OTR), Regional must be available 5 days out of the week and network fleet must be available 7 days a week.

Honestly, if you do all those things, you'll always exceed the pay commitment, but it's nice if you happen to have a screwed up week through no fault of your own.

My only niggle about that would be, define "excessive breaks." Is that taking an hour long break mid-trip instead of a 30 minute break to spend a few extra minutes in the shower trying to loosen a knotted muscle? Is that taking a 12 hour break instead of a 10 hour break because your shipper or receiver doesn't open until a certain time of day? Is that taking a 12 hour break to wait until traffic has thinned out rather than wasting an extra hour off your clock crawling along the freeway at walking apeed?

Who is deciding what is or is not excessive, and what metrics are they using to define it?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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