I Have 2 Minor (personal) At Fault Accidents And 1 Moving Violation.

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Madstackz's Comment
member avatar

I am not piling on, but for my own info.. I think I read in the hand book that you have 1 month(?) To report an accident even a non commercial one to your employer... or was that just guidelines or did I dream it?

If you have seen it before and know what section it is out of in the book then by all means show me so that I am corrected. I mean your profile says considering a career and good trucking schools go into alot of good detail. But If I am remembering correctly from mine I only have to report convicted moving violation to a current employer. I believe if injury or death occurred you have to report it but minor accidents you dont

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Was a police report filed? Was your insurance company contacted?

If “yes” to either of those questions, you must inform your company because an official record exists documenting the incident.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Madstackz's Comment
member avatar

Was a police report filed? Was your insurance company contacted?

If “yes” to either of those questions, you must inform your company because an official record exists documenting the incident.

Do you know of where to look in the book for it. The reason I ask is because doing some research there is mixed answers between drivers and trucking sites alike.

In Section § 383.31: it states you have to report in any vehicle a traffic violation (broke the law) in which the holder of a cdl has to inform their employer. Again I got no ticket and of course this was a personal vehicle. I understand in an cmv you would have to report it but I was not in a cmv.

If you or anyone could point me in the direction where it states I have to report any accident cmv or not, then please do so. I will probably take time in the next few days to look over the book again and see if I can find it there. But using the fmcsa website all I find is about what I talked about above. My intentions is not to break the law but also be cautious in my next steps moving forward.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

You are supposed to report any incident whatsoever to your employer, personal vehicle or no. And even if you weren't supposed to it doesn't make /any/ sense to let them figure it out. Own your ****up and tell them first.

I picked up a careless driving ticket in my personal vehicle 2.5 years ago, and the first thing I did was tell my current employer, as well as the future employer (I wasn't let go, there were some other factors involved in my leaving)

The thing is, it's not like you have two licenses. You have one. Anything attached to that license is reflective of who you are as a driver. This is why a company wants to see, even if you have items on your record, no /new/ incidents for "x" amount of time. It shows a change in behavior.

If you're already suitably employed, stick with it, put your effort into making sure you're not let go when they find out what happened, and focus on keeping your nose clean.

Madstackz's Comment
member avatar

You are supposed to report any incident whatsoever to your employer, personal vehicle or no. And even if you weren't supposed to it doesn't make /any/ sense to let them figure it out. Own your ****up and tell them first.

I picked up a careless driving ticket in my personal vehicle 2.5 years ago, and the first thing I did was tell my current employer, as well as the future employer (I wasn't let go, there were some other factors involved in my leaving)

The thing is, it's not like you have two licenses. You have one. Anything attached to that license is reflective of who you are as a driver. This is why a company wants to see, even if you have items on your record, no /new/ incidents for "x" amount of time. It shows a change in behavior.

If you're already suitably employed, stick with it, put your effort into making sure you're not let go when they find out what happened, and focus on keeping your nose clean.

I do not know what company you work for and that's irrelevant anyways. But company police and actual law is two different things. Alot of companies in their employee manual will state you have to report all accidents even in personal vehicle. But company policy usually goes above and beyond federal law.

The fmcsa is what we truckers go by. It is are definite law for truckers. I dont plan on staying with this company bc I get (in nearly a years time period) 8 hours less than what was promised. I get paid hourly so it's about 12000 worth I'm getting paid less. To me that is not acceptable. Now grant it I'm use to doing food service. The company im with now is ltl... maybe I should slow it down some but that is just not who I am. I do twice as many stops as most drivers that I work with. And yes that could be a big reason why I don't get as many hours but again I'm a go getter type of person. I dont even take an official break. If I'm at a stop for 50 mins... that is my break to me. Cause I literally do nothing for those 50 mins besides pro label some stuff and sign some bills.

So once again I ask. Idc about company policy only what's in our fmcsa book. If anyone knows where it is law I have to report any accident, even personal and no ticket issued, then please point me in the right direction in the fmcsa book itself.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Madstackz's Comment
member avatar

You are supposed to report any incident whatsoever to your employer, personal vehicle or no. And even if you weren't supposed to it doesn't make /any/ sense to let them figure it out. Own your ****up and tell them first.

I picked up a careless driving ticket in my personal vehicle 2.5 years ago, and the first thing I did was tell my current employer, as well as the future employer (I wasn't let go, there were some other factors involved in my leaving)

The thing is, it's not like you have two licenses. You have one. Anything attached to that license is reflective of who you are as a driver. This is why a company wants to see, even if you have items on your record, no /new/ incidents for "x" amount of time. It shows a change in behavior.

If you're already suitably employed, stick with it, put your effort into making sure you're not let go when they find out what happened, and focus on keeping your nose clean.

Another thing too.. idk maybe you have driven as much as me or maybe not. If you have you should know the company itself does not determine or have the final say on if you go or stay. I am 100% positive if the final say was left to my employer right now... I would not be let go. But at the end of the day, the final say goes to insurance. My question isnt so much as what company would hire me. With my experience and no ticket, violation, accident, etc as not been in a cmv , I guarantee you no company would turn me down. But it's the insurance that's truly runs the trucking business or at least with most places. All these driver requirements in most jobs like years of experience, or no more than this many violations in a period of time, that comes from insurance.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

On paper, sure, different company, different policies, and so on and so forth down the line. But in the long run if you're the type of person that's gonna try to hide this from your company instead of just calling them the day of or day after (which is what any responsible person would have done, if their job is any way connected to a commerical license [which it sounds like yours is, or at the least involves driving, as otherwise I can't imagine why they would run MVRs])

Since evidently you don't have access to google, the closest I can find is part 391 of the FMCSA regarding what you're required to report.

That indicates you're not /required/ by law to report incidents, so I was mistaken there.

That being said I think you're being a damn moron by not having told your company about this already. As it's been put to me by a family member that also drives commerically, this license is our lifeline, and it must be treated as such. [shrugs] what you do is up to you but I think you're gonna be stuck where you are for a bit since you're gonna need to keep your nose clean for a few years before a large company will touch you. Even a mom and pop will be hard pressed to take you in.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

FMCSA

Link didn't take the first time, hopefully this works

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bumping this...because Madstackz needs to read it again and heed the advice instead of trying to hide behind guidance he can’t even find...

Was a police report filed? Was your insurance company contacted?

If “yes” to either of those questions, you must inform your company because an official record exists documenting the incident.

Madstackz what don’t you get here? You are seriously mistakin’ and seriously FOS. I don’t care what the FMCSA has to say about your situation. It’s irrelevant!

The FMCSA doesn’t sign your paycheck. In the case of reporting accidents to your company; their policies and procedures are likely more stringent than FMCSA, and you need to comply with your company policy first and foremost if you want to stay employed.

Simple. Very simple. You can be within the law yet be in violation of your employer’s policies. Don’t ignore this basic fact and stop making things up.

Suggestion...invest some time reading and understanding your drivers manual before continuing yiur futile quest to find FMCSA guidance that will support your folly.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Will H.'s Comment
member avatar

I am not piling on, but for my own info.. I think I read in the hand book that you have 1 month(?) To report an accident even a non commercial one to your employer... or was that just guidelines or did I dream it?

So I take it that's a depends, but you should regardless. And yes I quoted myself.

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