Numbers Again

Topic 23558 | Page 1

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Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
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30k average for a newbie, that's take home right? Maybe 40 if I hit the ground running, run hard, and learn fast?

Hard to clean all the crap out of my ears hunting down credible information.

Splitter's Comment
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My gross in 6 months is nearly 25K!

andhe78's Comment
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Flatbedder. Got my truck January 2. On track to gross over 60k this year.

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
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My gross in 6 months is nearly 25K!

That's so much money, how are you doing it?

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
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Flatbedder. Got my truck January 2. On track to gross over 60k this year.

How long are you out? How long are you home? What kind of miles are you averaging?

Splitter's Comment
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My gross in 6 months is nearly 25K!

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That's so much money, how are you doing it?

Keeping my wheels turning! I drive for Prime reefer division. My truck is a lightweight which pays an extra .05 cents per mile. Today I ran 558 miles & have just over 400 left to my 90. I’m supposed to drop it on Thursday but I’ll attempt to convince them to take tomorrow instead. This gives me an extra day to run more miles. I trust my FM to keep me moving & as you can see from those numbers, it pays off.

Look at andhe78’s numbers. Flatbedder making those numbers is exceptional! They don’t deliver on the weekends. But they can get a load on Friday that they can run through the weekend. Allowing them to be earning while others sit around twiddling their thumbs.

It’s about effort. You get out what you out in. Oh! I’m a company driver!

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Splitter's Comment
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Edit: you get out what you put in.

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
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My truck is a lightweight which pays an extra .05 cents per mile.

Do they have enough room for a guy my size? 6'2

JuiceBox's Comment
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You can expect to take home anywhere from 30-60k depending on you.

andhe78's Comment
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Flatbedder. Got my truck January 2. On track to gross over 60k this year.

double-quotes-end.png

How long are you out? How long are you home? What kind of miles are you averaging?

I stay out eight weeks, then go home for ten days. My average miles for the whole year is 2248 miles per week. That is a bit misleading though. The first few months, my average was well under 2000 a week, while learning how to get more efficient chaining and tarping. Since the middle of July, have had only one week under 2500 with several 3000 mile weeks. Pretty weak numbers compared to the reefer and dry van drivers, but we do usually spend a bit more time loading and unloading and usually average a bit higher pay per mile. I saw mention of flatbedders running through the weekend, but I'm usually running out of hours by Saturday afternoon, so have taken a 34 almost every weekend I've been out. We don't get a ton of runs over 1000 miles, so pick up a load Friday, drive 600-800 miles over the weekend, and you'll usually be within an hour of delivery for Monday morning.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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