Duty Hour Log Book Cheating?

Topic 23964 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Let’s be honest, learning to bend the rules and use the “grey areas” to your advantage get you paid and gets the job done. It just is how it is. Like delivering off duty because you parked at the receiver. Technically is breaking the rules, but as long as you show some time for it, no one is going to say anything. Every “top tier” driver abuses the “grey area” with impunity. Just like before the days of e-logs drivers rewrote history on a regular basis.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Let’s be honest, learning to bend the rules and use the “grey areas” to your advantage get you paid and gets the job done. It just is how it is. Like delivering off duty because you parked at the receiver. Technically is breaking the rules, but as long as you show some time for it, no one is going to say anything. Every “top tier” driver abuses the “grey area” with impunity. Just like before the days of e-logs drivers rewrote history on a regular basis.

That's exactly what I'm saying. That's how it's always been and that hasn't changed.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I may take my break at a customer, but I'll certainly be showing loading or unloading time on my logs. I'll typically arrive, toss my BOLs in the back of the trailer, and show my on duty time then go to bed. They wake me (or more likely I get woken up) in the morning when they open and finished unloading or loading me. Most of our customers that allow overnight parking just let us sleep in the dock at night. One customer in Green Bay even brings coffee to your truck lol.. too bad I'm allergic to the stuff.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I'll certainly be showing loading or unloading time on my logs

You log on duty for loading and unloading? How much on duty time do you show each time? I could see doing a token 15 minutes or something for backing and paperwork, which I never did myself, but otherwise I would imagine you're off duty while waiting at customers, right?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'll certainly be showing loading or unloading time on my logs

double-quotes-end.png

You log on duty for loading and unloading? How much on duty time do you show each time? I could see doing a token 15 minutes or something for backing and paperwork, which I never did myself, but otherwise I would imagine you're off duty while waiting at customers, right?

Yes, just a token 15 mins. Than it is off duty / sleeper berth. I only spend what I have to outside of driving. I save as much of my 70 for driving as I can.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

I have this guy watch the loading and unloading😁🤣😆😁

0258577001543925830.jpg

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I will use my current run as an example. I parked at my receiver in Waukesha, WI Sunday night. I had a 5 am delivery yesterday. Since the load planners don’t come in to 8, I showed my delivery with my post trip. I got up in the morning and walked my paperwork inside. It is a drop and hook there so, I had already dropped my trailer and grabbed my MT. Got my paperwork signed and sent my MT call. I got my current load around 0830. I picked up in Stoughton, WI with a delivery in Lebanon, TN. I ran the hour to Stoughton. I had let dispatch know I would deliver at 1000. (Give myself a little wiggle room). Customer service ended up setting my appointment for 0800. I got a message saying they know my ETA is 1000 and they will work me in. I have been to this receiver plenty of times. Getting worked in is an all day affair. The only way I was going to get out of there at a decent time was to be there for the appointment. Long story short, is I ran my tail off. I did end up violating my 11 by 5 mins. But, I made my receiver. I will make the appointment time.i will get out of here at a decent time. I did get 703 miles in yesterday in a truck governed at 65 mph. I logged my live unload along with my post trip last night.that way I won’t start my clock again until I am finished getting unloaded. I will go get my dock assignment, put it the door and get unloaded all without ever starting my clock. My next load after this is Calhoun, TN to Wis Rapids, WI. I have never been to my next receiver, but if they allow overnight parking I will deliver tomorrow night. If not, I will deliver first thing Thursday morning. I imagine Thursday will be little local runs as I need to be at a yard Thursday night to get maintenance on my truck done Friday. Will end up resetting Friday. To leave out Saturday. Since most of our receivers are closed on the weekends, I will try and get a load heading out west for a Monday delivery.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I log whatever time it takes me to check in and dock, then my company considers us relieved of duty until loading or unloading is complete. Sometimes it might take me 6-8 minutes and other times 20+, just depending on how lengthy the check in process is. Those customers that allow me to just throw the BOLs in the trailer, dock, and go to bed, naturally take very little time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More