Where Is THE Best Place Women N What To Ask For That One Might Not Know Signing Up

Topic 24002 | Page 1

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Ellie 's Comment
member avatar

I made switch, going from coordinating/loading trucks to driving one!! I am going for CDL permit then training with a company who will not low ball me or use my inexperience with FAIR pay. Finding a woman friendly program hasn't been horribly difficult but still road blocks to over come stereo types. I want to work for a women friendly company where I will thrive and successful get more women In this field! I want OTR.Tuition reimbursement. Paid training. Health insurance. Hourly rate. What else does one need to ask for when negotiations begin? Fair CPM? Average is.55 cents why do most common ranges .14? I'm not owner operator. Yet! And when/if I drive "team" the other driver gets half my milage?? Wt* each dont have there own pay scale? Are incentives/ bonus typical? If so what are common? Ie safe driver incentives Then I find out detention pay or breakdown pay isnt common? Again What?? I don't want to miss something or lose out because of lack of knowledge...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to Trucking Truth.

Truth is, as an inexperienced driver, there is NOTHING to negotiate. You have nothing to offer but risk.

We highly recommend company sponsored training , that way you have a job waiting, and a company has more of in interest in helping you succeed as a driver, in an attempt to recover their monetary investment in you.

These links will help:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL TrainingTruck Driver's Career Guide

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Ellie 's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it didn't come out clear... Every industry has "negotiations". Experience and inexperience pays differently . We,as women,are already lower paid in almost every field. I don't want to sign on a with a company and not "know to ask for detention time" and Alot of companies don't pay or pay only after a certain amount of time. That is the "inside tip" for negotiations I am looking for. My experience so far in This industry let's me know to ask for it but if I didn't have that knowledge/Experience I wouldn't know to ask for it!? Those tips ANY HELP is greatly appreciated.

I am talking with recruiters/ schools and companies, down to my last few companies now. Working on permit. than off to Training in January.

Welcome to Trucking Truth.

Truth is, as an inexperienced driver, there is NOTHING to negotiate. You have nothing to offer but risk.

We highly recommend company sponsored training , that way you have a job waiting, and a company has more of in interest in helping you succeed as a driver, in an attempt to recover their monetary investment in you.

These links will help:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL TrainingTruck Driver's Career Guide

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe it didn't come out clear... Every industry has "negotiations". Experience and inexperience pays differently . We,as women,are already lower paid in almost every field. I don't want to sign on a with a company and not "know to ask for detention time" and Alot of companies don't pay or pay only after a certain amount of time. That is the "inside tip" for negotiations I am looking for. My experience so far in This industry let's me know to ask for it but if I didn't have that knowledge/Experience I wouldn't know to ask for it!? Those tips ANY HELP is greatly appreciated.

I am talking with recruiters/ schools and companies, down to my last few companies now. Working on permit. than off to Training in January.

double-quotes-start.png

Welcome to Trucking Truth.

Truth is, as an inexperienced driver, there is NOTHING to negotiate. You have nothing to offer but risk.

We highly recommend company sponsored training , that way you have a job waiting, and a company has more of in interest in helping you succeed as a driver, in an attempt to recover their monetary investment in you.

These links will help:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL TrainingTruck Driver's Career Guide

double-quotes-end.png

You made yourself loud and clear... and so did Susan. Companies do not negotiate with new drivers. They have company policy that is it. You will not get an hourly rate for OTR as that is common in local driving, and EVERY new driver starts at the same rate, male and female. So please save the feminist "hear me roar" crap for another forum. Trucking is about personal responsibility and productivity. If you are good, a lower paying cpm wont matter cause you would rack up the miles. Bonuses are an after thought.

Trucking companies dont give a crap what sex you are. They want safe drivers who deliver early. Period.

I dont know where the heck you got your information but starting at 55cpm average is a flat out LIE! I train drivers at one of the highest paying starter companies and the pay is 44cpm for reefer , 49cpm for a lightweight reefer (much smaller interior, less storage space). Susan is also a trainer with a wealth of knowledge. Maybe you didnt mean to come across aggressive but you did and we dont take that here. You came in here with a "for the women" attitude then an experienced female trainer gave you information and you balked at her. That in itself shows what i call the "false sisterhood" of our society. I said it before, a female owned trucking firm would still fire you for accidents. Its bad business to keep a liability, and if they didnt fire you, they woukd be stupid and bankrupt.

As for the 14cpm, that is TRAINING pay. At my company training is team style after you get the CDL. You get a guarantee of $700 gross per week or 14cpm whichever is better.

With teaming, the combined mileage is paid to the truck then split between the two drivers. that is how it works. i can already see you are not a team player, so go solo.

As far as women friendly companies, they ALL want any safe woman who will.deliver on time. Thats it Prime has more woman friendly amenities such as spa,/salons and steam showers, but honestly, your attitude is going to hold you back.

You want an inside tip? Susan is right. Being a CDL holder means nothing until you get through training and gain a year or more of safe driving experience. You are a liability until then. These are 80k pound killing machines that need to be taken seriously.

As far as bonuses, they differ from company to company. Detention at my company is paid automatically as long as you write dates and times on the bills. I get fuel, safety, on time delivery bonuses in cash as well as lots of perks like jackets and a diamond ring. The breakdown pay goes to all company drivers that i know of. I dont know any trucking company that does not do this. UNLESS it is a lease op...company drivers and lease ops are two very different animals.

Be aware 95% of people who go to orientations do not make it through their first year. My class had 76 and by the end of the first week I was one of 20. Out of us, 4 failed the exam. By the end of the team training there were 6 of us left. By the end of the first year only 3.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, getting your permit and DOT physical could be a waste of time and money. each company has its own requirements. Mine would have you go to MO and get a permit there then transfer it back to your home state. CFI in MO does the opposite.

Before you attempt to "negotiate" you better make sure your background is solid.

they want 3 years clean driving, verifiable employment, clean criminal history etc. my company bans many common prescribed medications and could send you home until you are on another for 30 days. I know so many people who never thought they had issues.."it was just one ticket...the DUI was 10 years ago....it wasnt a DOT drug test i failed" etc.

good luck

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

Now that you have heard from our two very experienced woman drivers/trainers, here is my input. As said before, there is no negotiating with your perspective company. They have an offer you take it or don't. Every company compensates drivers a little differently. All pay CPM , unless you live in California, or own or lease a truck. Some companies will hire you as a contractor, 1099. More financial responsibility for you. If you work as a company driver, W2 employee, there are different benefits companies offer. Your idea of starting at 55 CPM is laughable. To the best of my knowledge, Prime and Millis offer the highest starting CPM. I drive for CFI and currently make 42 CPM. We get a quarterly safety bonus, detention, Northeast pay, Hazmat Pay, short haul pay, and layover/breakdown pay. Once eligible, we start earning PTO/vacation days. At CFI we don't lose our built up hometime days and can take as many as you want without having to turn in your truck. We are reimbursed for parking, showers and anything we have to buy to keep the truck moving. Why do I stay at and love CFI? Because, I am treated very well and with respect.

You have nothing to offer a new employer except, risk and potential. We highly recommend Paid CDL Training Programs. I went through CFI's. When companies invest several thousand dollars into your training, they have a vested interest in your success. Before trucking I worked varied jobs, all your experience will do is help you empathize with our support people.

Trucking is one of the few careers where sex, race, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, religion or any other label you can come up with mean NOTHING. The only thing companies care about is that you get to your appointments early and safely. In this career it is like being your own boss. Nobody micro manages you. If you are doing your job right, no one will bother you. As far as realistic pay here is my pay, with pay stubs. The links Susan provided will help you get started. I would also suggest you read as many of our Training Diaries as you can. They will help show you all the difficulties people have with training. Sure there are many success, however, we all have trouble learning this.

Good luck to you we are here to help. By the way the only advantage women have out here is they can play the girl card.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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