Question About Running Out Of Hours.

Topic 2431 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Yep's Comment
member avatar

Say you go to a dock where the employees are in no real hurry. They take so long in fact that either your 11 or 14 hr clock runs out. Now add the issues of them not allowing you to do/finish your 10 hours and no nearby truck parking. What do you do? Risk driving? Sit there till they call the cops? What?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

It's the ultimate catch-22.

I would love to hear what the police would say if the customer called them because you wouldn't leave. When you showed them you were out of hours and couldn't legally move, and yet the customer is within their rights to force you to leave, I'd love to know what the officer would say. He obviously can't tell you to drive the truck. I guess he could write you a ticket for trespassing if he wanted to.

I'll tell ya man - the trucking industry is full of those kind of situations. I've had to go over bridges and down roads that were rated below my weight because it was the only way in or out of a customer.

If you were to ask Congress about how drivers are supposed to handle situations like this, they would say, "We don't know the answer to that, but we know that pretending to look out for the public safety by needlessly tweaking the logbook rules will get us re-elected!"

Of course they would say that if they were being honest. But they're not honest and they don't know the answers. Their job isn't to make sense or make sensible laws. Their job is to make it appear as if they're sensible and making sensible laws so they'll get re-elected.

In the end, it's a no-win situation for the driver. You can't stay but you can't leave either. I'd be really curious to hear what the safety department has to say about that.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Free Spirit ( AKA #Hashta's Comment
member avatar

Daniel, just out of pure curiosity and not leading to an answer for Mason, but what would you do in that type of situation?

Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

Notify your company at the first sign of your clock running out. They can get in contact with the shipper/receiver to make arrangements for you to stay there. They could also get another driver to come take over for you. In the worst case, the safety dept. would have to get a tow truck to take you to the closest truck parking.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Mrs.Hashtag,

I've been in that situation plenty of times. I delivered to a Spartan Foods in Michigan and they took forever. They woke me up in the middle of the night and told me to leave. This was a small town and a truck stop was less than an hour away so I put my truck in first gear and crawled to the truck stop. If you drive in first gear (about 3mph) the Qualcomm will not notice that you're driving and won't give you a violation. But as soon as you touch the accelerator it will start screaming at you that you're violating the HoS rules.

Another time I broke down on the side of the road. By the time the repair man came to me and fixed my truck my 14 hour clock had expired. It was 9 miles to the nearest parking. So I logged out of my Qualcomm and drove to the parking. I logged back in the Qualcomm and it says "You have logged X amount of time driving, would you like to credit this to your profile?" (Or something along those lines.)

I then chose "No." and it logged back in and updated my logs and didn't give me a violation. Its a dangerous trick to use because if you get an inspection and it says you parked at city X and 5 minutes later you're in city Y all while you were on sleeper berth - well, you're going to have to face some difficult questioning by the DOT officer. But I would rather gamble and avoid the violation, especially since I only got 1 inspection in a year.

What GA Rookie said is technically true. But getting ahold of Safety at 3Am in the morning is difficult enough, and then you would have to get ahold of Customer Service and get them to talk to the shipper/receiver.. All I can say is good luck, I don't see it happening. I also highly doubt a driver would come to you just to drive your truck to a safe place, how will he get back to his own truck?

I've had my clutch break on me. As in, I no longer had the clutch pedal. And I was told to bobtail with no clutch to the Freightliner dealership. If they wouldn't buy me a tow to the dealership, then I highly doubt they would buy me a tow just to move me to a parking spot. Tow trucks are expensive and companies aren't foolish with their money. Just my opinion from been there done that.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

Each company is going to have a different policy. I was just stating Crete's policy regarding the situation. They actually address this out of hours situation in their safety policy. It is written in their policy that they will call a tow truck. I am sure this is only worse case scenario where you are forced to leave the property, but can't legally drive. Will they be happy about the bill...NO!...but it is their written policy so I would hope they follow it.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Each company is going to have a different policy. I was just stating Crete's policy regarding the situation. They actually address this out of hours situation in their safety policy. It is written in their policy that they will call a tow truck. I am sure this is only worse case scenario where you are forced to leave the property, but can't legally drive. Will they be happy about the bill...NO!...but it is their written policy so I would hope they follow it.

If that's true then my hats off to them! smile.gif

RookieTrucker's Comment
member avatar

I'm glad Crete actually has a way to handle this. My company doesn't. The standard answer you get is "Do good trip planning." Yeah, I should know ahead of time that an unload at a company I've never been to is going to take 12 hours.

I asked my driver manager about this and got no real answer. I asked my fleet manager about this and got no real answer. Finally I called up our safety department at headquarters and they said, "Note on your logs that you are going to safe haven when you have to drive past your hours and they'll take it into consideration if we audit your logs." I said, "OK, that covers me with you guys, but what about with law enforcement?" She said, "Oh, you can still get ticketed for the HOS violations.

Finally, I got stopped at an inspection point for random Level 1 DOT inspections one day in TN. (I passed.) I asked the trooper about it. He said he used to drive trucks. His answer was, "If it was me, I'd drive to the closest safe haven. If the customer calls me because you won't leave their property, you're going to jail." I asked him if what I heard about calling law enforcement for an escort to safe haven was true. (My safety department had also suggested this as a possibility.) He said, "We're not coming out to give you an escort anywhere." I said, "So, basically, we're just screwed by circumstances beyond our control, right?" Then he said the most telling thing of all, "I'm not going to write anyone a ticket for just trying to get to safe haven. But I can't guarantee some other prick won't write you a ticket."

So, my takeaway from all of this is, avoid the violations as much as possible, log what happens and why, and if a LEO catches you for it, be extremely pleasant and cooperative and hopefully you won't get an expensive citation. It's totally no-win at this point.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

I can tell you what the trainer I've been rolling with would do, he would go to line 5 and drive to the trucks top. Sill not technically legal, but that would be his solution. Guess the argument would be you are driving for personal reasons. The shipper said you can't stay or you may be arrested so I'm moving my person to another location.

Although not all companies offer line 5 as an option on their elogs.

Woody

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

RookieTrucker's Comment
member avatar

As I understand it, line 5 is only for owner/ops, because it's meant for people using their trucks as their personal vehicles. Can't do that if it's not your truck.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Logbook Questions Understanding The Laws
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More