Packed And Ready To Head Out To Wolding.

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LDRSHIP's Comment
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The pace count thing saved my hide more than a few times when I first went solo. I always kept a few red cloth shop rags in my truck. I got the strangest looks one time at a pilot that is VERY tight to back in. I paced it out and it went right in. After I put it in the parking spot another driver that had been watching asked me about it.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Can you explain this method please? I may find it helpful to trainees.. thanks

..heel to toe pace count method of 90 degree backing..
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Can you explain this method please? I may find it helpful to trainees.. thanks

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..heel to toe pace count method of 90 degree backing..

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You pace of heel to toe from the middle of the tandems forward to the middle of the trailer (the mid market light). Remember this number.

You pull-up along a line of trailers about 3 feet away. When the midline of the trailer hits the middle of the open spot you steer hard right away from the trailers for a couple seconds, then hard left until the truck is straight with the trailer. The result is the trailer should be at a bit of an angle with the line of trailers, with the back of yours somewhere past the opening.

You get out and go to the back of the trailer and pick an intersection of the angle down the side of your trailer, and the line of the edge of the spot you are backing into (about a foot away or so). This is your pivot point for the tandems.

From that pivot point, you walk toward your trailer along the side the number of steps in step one. Put down a marker. That is where you need the center of your tandems to start the maneuver.

You now figure out how many steps you need to move forward or back to put the center of your tandems beside that marker.

Go to the front of the truck and pick a spot (I use the line of the front edge of the chrome step) to use as a reference point. You pace from that point the number of steps forward or back you need to get the center of your tandems beside the rear marker. Put down a marker. Pull forward or back to line that marker up with your reference point. Go back to the rear and make sure your tandem center is directly beside the marker.

Once it is, you steer right all the way to the stop before moving. Back up until your truck is exactly 90 degrees to the trailer. That will be the point when the trailer tires stop turning and start pivoting/sliding. Stop.

Using the catwalk as a guide is the final check. GOAL and be sure the catwalk is parallel to the trailer. Do not go more than 90, slightly less is ok but shoot for exactly 90.

Now turn to the stops to the left before moving. Start backing until the truck is in line with the trailer, GOALING as needed. The trailer will pivot right into the spot. Once the truck is straight with the trailer, back straight up.

It amazed me how simple it was. It will pivot perfectly into place.

I’ll get a picture tomorrow that will help illustrate.

This method also works for the alley dock.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Ok. Maybe this will help explain picking the pivot point. Then the tandem center should be the number of steps from that point. For me it is 18 steps.

Pardon my hasty artistry.

0570904001548301230.jpg

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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I have only done this 3 or 4 times, but it has gone straight in every time. After the 90, I don’t even think you would have to GOAL, it works so well, but obvious you should.

This makes it look so easy. You may look like a beginner setting it up, but you should be able to put it in every single time.

As my instructor said, it is simple geometry. Unfortunately, I never took geometry. But once he showed me, I am a believer.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Oh, and about the Bison thing. Someone that works in the office said they bought Wolding.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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By the way, in the example above, after you back your truck to 90 from your trailer, the canter of your tandems should be exactly at the pivot point.

And if you mess up, because you were steering stop to stop, it is easy if something goes wrong to get right back to your starting point to correct.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

A little different then we did it. Anyways you start out straight. First you need to find your pace count. It will change with each tractor as every tractor turning radius is a little different. You drop a rag, or some other marker at mid tandem. You turn your steering wheel hard to the right. You back up until your tractor is 90 degrees to the trailer. Go drop another marker at mid tandem. Count heel to toe from one marker to the next. That is your pace count. Remember that number.

You set up pretty much as Grumpy said. As you pass your intended point you want to back into, once your turn signal on the trailer passes the mid point of the middle of the “hole” you turn to the right then back left. This is to give you room for you tractor to turn. You should be about a 20 degree angle.

A lot of what Grumpy said is how it works. You pace from your pivot point to the spot where the center of the tandems should be. You mark that spot and move forward or back as need to align your tandems mid marker. This method will work regardless of where your tandems are slid on the trailer. Just watch the overhang in back not to catch anything. When your tandems are aligned with the marker you turn the steering wheel hard to the right and back up until your tractor is 90 degrees to your trailer. Cat walk is a good reference. Once your tractor is 90 degrees you turn your steering wheel hard left. You back up until your tractor is back parallel to the front edge of the trailers. You pull forward 8 to 10 paces straight forward. Turn your steering wheel hard left again and back up. When your tractor is straight with your trailer you should be able to straight line back the rest of the way into the hole.

This will work blindside as well just with opposite steering wheel movement. All it requires is taking the time to pace out the distance from your pivot point. It is a fool proof method of getting your trailer in the hole. You will only need about 50 feet from the front edge the “hole” to allow for your turning radius.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I don’t remember getting the pace count the way you say, but you are likely correct. I’m sure I have it wrong.

But I definitely didn’t have to pull forward after the hard left back. That is how he said to give myself more space out front, but do far I have been able to just pivot it right in.

I’ll be practicing tomorrow so I’ll double check everything

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Oh, and about the Bison thing. Someone that works in the office said they bought Wolding.

The gossip and speculations are rampant among ALL the employees. The only people that truly know what is going on are the Woldings. Probably Eric as well, since he is Marc’s right hand man. So unless you here it from Marc, Don, Eric, or perhaps John in safety; it is just speculation.

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