Any Tanker Companies Hire Straight Out Of School?

Topic 252 | Page 3

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Seadragon wrote:

Trimac Transportation is good for OTR. Can make over $100K in their Elite Fleet running coast to coast

Seadragon do you work for Trimac? That's some serious coin you mentioned, can you substantiate this further.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Seadragon wrote:

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Trimac Transportation is good for OTR. Can make over $100K in their Elite Fleet running coast to coast

double-quotes-end.png

Seadragon do you work for Trimac? That's some serious coin you mentioned, can you substantiate this further.

Just a real quick update on this...had some time to check out Trimac's website, specifically their open driving opportunities. For experienced drivers they are advertising "up to 47K annual income" level for company drivers in South Eastern locations. I strongly believe the pay referenced above is Owner Operator gross pay; before costs, expenses and taxes are factored in and taken out (deducted).

So again Seadragon, how did you come up with a number like this; "over 100k"? We like to stick to the facts here, so please offer some.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Seadragon H.'s Comment
member avatar

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Seadragon wrote:

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Trimac Transportation is good for OTR. Can make over $100K in their Elite Fleet running coast to coast

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Seadragon do you work for Trimac? That's some serious coin you mentioned, can you substantiate this further.

double-quotes-end.png

Just a real quick update on this...had some time to check out Trimac's website, specifically their open driving opportunities. For experienced drivers they are advertising "up to 47K annual income" level for company drivers in South Eastern locations. I strongly believe the pay referenced above is Owner Operator gross pay; before costs, expenses and taxes are factored in and taken out (deducted).

So again Seadragon, how did you come up with a number like this; "over 100k"? We like to stick to the facts here, so please offer some.

The driver I'm familiar with is a company driver and stays out 3 weeks. He runs, for example, from Los Angeles to Delaware and back to California, then maybe to Florida. He said he's only required to stay out 2 weeks, but he prefers 3 weeks. He makes over $100K per year. The $47K you mentioned must be for hauling dry bulk cement or flyash locally. Hazmat chemical drivers with any tanker outfit never make that low. I easily made $65K with another company and only worked 11 mos a year because I like long vacations. I have no reason to BS anyone on here and I trust the drivers word that he makes that. The average pay is $80K where he is, but he never slows down or goofs off. There's some excellent high paying jobs around if drivers are motivated to search for them; not with the megas though. For example, Continental Carbonic, which is dry van hauling dry ice. Most drivers never heard of the company but the pay is great: Company Driver Benefits Average Pay $70,000 Annual Top Pay $90,000 Annual

Then there's Old Dominion; I know a guy running teams there doing line haul and they split $225K per year doing west coast turnarounds. This company hires new cdl grads at most terminals, especially in PA.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Yes, this is true with Old Dominion teams.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

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Seadragon wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Trimac Transportation is good for OTR. Can make over $100K in their Elite Fleet running coast to coast

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Seadragon do you work for Trimac? That's some serious coin you mentioned, can you substantiate this further.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Just a real quick update on this...had some time to check out Trimac's website, specifically their open driving opportunities. For experienced drivers they are advertising "up to 47K annual income" level for company drivers in South Eastern locations. I strongly believe the pay referenced above is Owner Operator gross pay; before costs, expenses and taxes are factored in and taken out (deducted).

So again Seadragon, how did you come up with a number like this; "over 100k"? We like to stick to the facts here, so please offer some.

double-quotes-end.png

The driver I'm familiar with is a company driver and stays out 3 weeks. He runs, for example, from Los Angeles to Delaware and back to California, then maybe to Florida. He said he's only required to stay out 2 weeks, but he prefers 3 weeks. He makes over $100K per year. The $47K you mentioned must be for hauling dry bulk cement or flyash locally. Hazmat chemical drivers with any tanker outfit never make that low. I easily made $65K with another company and only worked 11 mos a year because I like long vacations. I have no reason to BS anyone on here and I trust the drivers word that he makes that. The average pay is $80K where he is, but he never slows down or goofs off. There's some excellent high paying jobs around if drivers are motivated to search for them; not with the megas though. For example, Continental Carbonic, which is dry van hauling dry ice. Most drivers never heard of the company but the pay is great: Company Driver Benefits Average Pay $70,000 Annual Top Pay $90,000 Annual

Then there's Old Dominion; I know a guy running teams there doing line haul and they split $225K per year doing west coast turnarounds. This company hires new cdl grads at most terminals, especially in PA.

Seadragon, thanks for taking the time to provide additional details. Can't ask for more than that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Richard S.'s Comment
member avatar

Eagle transport hires straight out of tri county technical college cdl school

Been looking around the interwebs trying to find some tanker companies and/or divisions that hire straight out of CDL school. At this point (before even getting my CDL... lol) I THINK I want to be a tanker driver. Pay looks decent, highly specialized skillset, would be delivering to some interesting places, and so on.

As far as I can tell pretty much no one hires tanker drivers straight out of school. I've looked at Quality Distribution Inc., Superior Carriers, Ruan, Goodman Tank Lines, few others I can't think of.

I know Schneider has a tanker division, I haven't called them just yet, but it seems like they might possibly put new hires into tanker division.

Are there any other companies anyone can think of or has personal experience with regarding tanker driving for a new graduate?

Like Brett and many others say, stick out the first year and more opportunities open up. Seems like all the tanker companies want 1 year experience, some even say 6 months. But if I can start out tanker I think that would be good for me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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