Any Tanker Companies Hire Straight Out Of School?

Topic 252 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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what are companies that you know of that have a tanker division hauling food grade products?

Off the top of my head, Prime and Schneider have tanker divisions and I think Schneider has food grade but I'm not certain.

Some food grade companies include Opies, Indian River, & Carry

TorqueSide's Comment
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Never knew about food-grade; will look into it.

Diver's Comment
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I think McKenzie will hire students as well. I've seen their pamphlets at my school. And like Bill said, CTL (division of Comcar Industries) will hire students and they haul chemicals.

Seadragon H.'s Comment
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I think McKenzie will hire students as well. I've seen their pamphlets at my school. And like Bill said, CTL (division of Comcar Industries) will hire students and they haul chemicals.

Here's some more that hire new CDL grads:

SVTN
Superior Carriers
Groendyke Transport
Tidewater Transit
Schneider Bulk
CTL Transportation
Coastal Transport
Trimac Transportation

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John N.'s Comment
member avatar

25 years otr 3 years of that pulling food grade tanker want to move up to hazmat carrier can I get some responses on gross yearly income pull only hazmat for miller transporters or transwood or one of the other

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Not to derail the subject, but the question was asked if gases behave as liquids. The short answer is yes. But as Brett said, most gases hauled in bulk transport will be cooled to a liquid or near liquid state. Reason is simple. The more solid a collection of matter is the more densely it is packed. Therefore the more you can carry in a given volume. Don't we all love science.

And on another note, but related. Personnel who fly must be familiar with fluid dynamics; because, gases dynamics behave in an like manner. TBH, they behave exactly the same. Only difference is the density of a given volume of matter. Therefore changing the amount of drag exerted.

Drive Safe and God Soeed.

Tastebuds's Comment
member avatar

Not to derail the subject, but the question was asked if gases behave as liquids. The short answer is yes. But as Brett said, most gases hauled in bulk transport will be cooled to a liquid or near liquid state. Reason is simple. The more solid a collection of matter is the more densely it is packed. Therefore the more you can carry in a given volume. Don't we all love science.

And on another note, but related. Personnel who fly must be familiar with fluid dynamics; because, gases dynamics behave in an like manner. TBH, they behave exactly the same. Only difference is the density of a given volume of matter. Therefore changing the amount of drag exerted.

Drive Safe and God Soeed.

Liquids and gases are both fluids.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
3 years of that pulling food grade tanker want to move up to hazmat carrier

What makes you think that's a move up? I pulled food grade tanker for a year one time and absolutely loved it. I never had any indication that the chemical tanker drivers were making any more than I was and look at the job conditions. They go to filthy, nasty chemical plants and breathe that filthy air and have to watch safety videos and wear protective gear and drive around all the time with placarded loads of highly dangerous chemicals under the close eye of the DOT.

Food grade guys get to go to orchards and dairies and drive around without placards carrying honey and cream and vegetable oil breathing clean air.

Me personally.........you'd have to pay me way, way, way more money to convince me to give up a food gig for a chemical gig and I just don't think the money is there. Food grade pays well because the freight pays well. There's a lot that goes into cleaning the tanks, keeping the equipment up to date, and hauling those loads without baffles. So I don't think you're going to find much difference in pay between the chemical and food grade side. I'm not sure if we have anyone on this forum that hauls chemical tanker or not. If so I'm hoping they'll chime in.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Tanker Man's Comment
member avatar

I am not in the chemical side of the tankers, but i do pull LPG (propane and butane), gas/diesel/transmix, and asphalt during the summer. You can make very good money pulling hazmat , depending on who you go with. I was brought on when I started and was told the average was $65k a year for the companies drivers, high $80s depending on how you run, and yes that is doable if you run your rear off. I do love pulling tankers, absolutely love it! Honestly wouldn't want to do anything else. However, it's been very stressful for me since I am very new to the industry and learning to drive as well as handle tankers has been a major learning curve for me. I will post about my experience through out this journey to give y'all an idea of what I had to do to get to where I'm at thus far.

Sorry for hijacking with this but wanted to at least say yes there is one hazmat tanker driver here, I do linger through the forum just don't post as much as I should :/. Anyway, as I said earlier hazmat tankers for my company are making average $65k a year plus.

double-quotes-start.png

3 years of that pulling food grade tanker want to move up to hazmat carrier

double-quotes-end.png

What makes you think that's a move up? I pulled food grade tanker for a year one time and absolutely loved it. I never had any indication that the chemical tanker drivers were making any more than I was and look at the job conditions. They go to filthy, nasty chemical plants and breathe that filthy air and have to watch safety videos and wear protective gear and drive around all the time with placarded loads of highly dangerous chemicals under the close eye of the DOT.

Food grade guys get to go to orchards and dairies and drive around without placards carrying honey and cream and vegetable oil breathing clean air.

Me personally.........you'd have to pay me way, way, way more money to convince me to give up a food gig for a chemical gig and I just don't think the money is there. Food grade pays well because the freight pays well. There's a lot that goes into cleaning the tanks, keeping the equipment up to date, and hauling those loads without baffles. So I don't think you're going to find much difference in pay between the chemical and food grade side. I'm not sure if we have anyone on this forum that hauls chemical tanker or not. If so I'm hoping they'll chime in.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Seadragon H.'s Comment
member avatar

Trimac Transportation is good for OTR. Can make over $100K in their Elite Fleet running coast to coast.

25 years otr 3 years of that pulling food grade tanker want to move up to hazmat carrier can I get some responses on gross yearly income pull only hazmat for miller transporters or transwood or one of the other

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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