Oil Field Experience

Topic 26190 | Page 1

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Edwin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Good day all, and thank you for accepting me to this site. Seems honest, and straight forward.

So basically got myself a CDL with n,t endorsements and my Hazmat is pending.

I am a 46 years young grandpa, and I am green to the trucking industry. I relocated from NY and finally nicely acclimated to El Paso, Texas.

Granted, no matter the industry, I have to pay dues. What I would like to get some further insight for is what are the steps a person needs to take when trying gain experience in the hauling of frac sand, or water (Vacuum, blowers etc.....) or even getting basic training with pneumatic tanks, without getting too exploited for long? Are there any companies I should be looking in to when seeking this experience or knowledge.?

Aside my venture in to this new industry, I've held leadership roles over dozens of personalities at low paying administrative positions all my life. So I am very responsible and resourceful, personable. I wonder if this will take me far in trucking. I find it a blessing to have obtained my CDL even at this date in my life. Let me digress and just ask, where do I go from here?..

Thank you .. Best to all,

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Good start would be to contact companies in that field and find out what their requirements are and go from there.

Most likely you will need some experience behind the wheel. I know there were some programs through the community colleges near Midland, TX that would get people ready for the field.

Amish country's Comment
member avatar

Look into dry bulk companies in the area to get the tank experience. You can usually find cement work pretty easily.

Side note on oil field work. I have a friend that does it in the northeast and is gone 2 weeks at a time and putting in 120+ hours a week between driving and other duties. Not sure how it would be down there but that's been his experience. Ridiculous money nut a huge time commitment.

Edwin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Big T "I know there were some programs through the community colleges near Midland, TX that would get people ready for the field." Thank you! Good idea!, you know, didn't actually think of that. I going to look in to that.

Amish country- For sure man, the system in Odessa/Midland is usually a 21 on 7 off on good seasons (in what I've researched) my kids are grown and I left the northeast for this experience down here (Actually love the southwest and west coast, feel blessed to be here.). Nobody in the oil fields, not even labor hands "Roustabouts" are leaving with less that say 75-80k with all the work. You're correct "ridiculous paper $$$) I'm actually ready to commit given the debts I have and goals. Guess once I am in, I am focused on not looking at time off until the bank can reflect better options for my family of course.

Thanks again gentlemen .

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Edwin, Frack is a cruel mistress. My brother did it for about three years. When she is busy, she's bustling and cozy, and keeps you all warm. Buuuttttt, when the booms slow, she drops you like a golddigger spying Howard Hughes.

Good luck if you stay this course, the contract outfits will tell you they need drivers, but many will have a large stable of units, and many are idle. Always hiring, not always utilizing. His experience was that "Sandbox(?)" was one of the busier outfits, and Slumberge(?) ran a pretty tight ship if you can contract on with them. This experience was from 2 or so yrs back

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

ChickenPlucker's Comment
member avatar

Let me help you out, I've been in the oilfield since 2005.

Sand is feast or famine

Cement is feast or famine

If you get hired on to wireline you'll make 100k a year for young man slave work, I spent 4 years in the infantry and WL was the hardest thing I've ever done.

Flowback is hard to get into, need to know someone

I work in crude oil and that's what I would suggest. Go on down to Dilley, TX and get hired on with a crappy starter company like Xcaliber Logistics. Forget the idea that you need oilfield experience, they only care that you have 2 years of driving CDL for insurance premiums, that's it.

Oh and ignore that whole roughnecks make 80k crap, some of them only make 50k but on the upside you only work 6 months out of the year. To work in oil, in my opinion, you gotta hustle hard. I work for outlaw outfits that allow me to make good money on the regular, but companies like them won't take any Tom or Larry right off the street. I would avoid any company that doesn't sound English, except Dupree. You could also try Pilot. There's so much stability in crude it is a joke to do anything else. I know OTR is what floods the boards but I don't mind giving some oilfield advice.

Do not go to any school or pay any money for something a company can provide you and pay you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

I spent 20 years in the oilfield as a diver. If you get into the oilfield in ANY fashion, sock away as much money as you can. As stated, the oilfield is a cruel and heartless *****. Personally, I went reefer to get as far away from it as possible. Even with freight slowing down, America still has to eat. Good luck to you.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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