Recruiters

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Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

Old School,

Thank you. I really just plan on being a sponge learning everything I can. Pray I make smart decisions and avoid huge mistakes that would stop me from driving. Building my confidence is important because even with my CDL I'm still nervous about going out with a trainer. I appreciate your advice .

Cecelia

Cecelia, you're doing the right thing avoiding those dollar store accounts. I think the recruiters are getting extra bonus money for signing people up for them. It's a rough way to learn as a rookie. We never recommend it to newbies.

Crete is a great company. Just remember getting yourself established in trucking takes time and commitment. We all get frustrated, but don't let your frustration cause you to lay the blame on your company. It's just trucking. Switching companies doesn't eliminate a rookie's issues.

Wherever you start just hang in there until you gain some confidence in yourself. It will take every bit of that first year to begin to feel you're getting the hang of this.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Dave S (formerly known as's Comment
member avatar

I'm sure G-Town can give you way more and better info then I can. G-Town has a post here about the day in the life of a dedicated Walmart driver. Very good read.

I'll attempt to throw a few more pennies out. Once again from the experience I had. Day to day you'll answer to Walmart's dispatch. Pay attention to the directions given on the trip sheets for getting in and out of stores. There might be a file with google maps printed out that show directional info on how to get in and out of each store.

Good luck and stay safe!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cecelia, I am happy to assist with information on Walmart Dedicated.

It's obviously a subject near and dear to my heart. I do not want to overload you so please give me an idea of what you want to know, what to expect, etc. Initially I suggest visiting several Walmart docks in your area, approach them as if you had to get your trailer into one of the doors. Also look for clues, signs directing trucks where-to-go. Observe all of it, take it in, because this is what you will be facing numerous times per day at up to 5 different store locations. Your thought process will need to change from one you are familiar with; "a shopper", to one you aren't, "Trucker". It's a transition that will require some time before it becomes second nature.

Not sure how Crete trains new Walmart driver, but at our DC we have the new drivers ride-along with an experienced hand for 2-3 days to help with the learning curve. The absolute best scenario is for you to road-train on the Walmart account. Please ask them about that.

I have written a blog about my first few months as a WallyWagon driver...here is the link: The Freedom of Trucking

Here is the past thread Dave mentioned: A Day In the Life of a Walmart Dedicated Driver.

Good luck and please let me know how else I can help.

0609576001569599274.jpg

Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

G-Town, I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and give advice. I spoke with my recruiter and the women who helped set up my orientation. They said my training will be 6-8 weeks OTR. But i will have the option upon completing that to go out with for a few days who is familiar with the Walmart Dedicated. They offered me Walmart Dedicated or MidSouth Regional and I can change but I think I want to tackle the Walmart. I dont mind having to be in training for longer to learn the dedicated route tips and tricks to make me successful. Would you explain how you mean 5 stores. So in a normal day you are delivering to 5 different stores? And how does it work when you show up?

Cecelia

Cecelia, I am happy to assist with information on Walmart Dedicated.

It's obviously a subject near and dear to my heart. I do not want to overload you so please give me an idea of what you want to know, what to expect, etc. Initially I suggest visiting several Walmart docks in your area, approach them as if you had to get your trailer into one of the doors. Also look for clues, signs directing trucks where-to-go. Observe all of it, take it in, because this is what you will be facing numerous times per day at up to 5 different store locations. Your thought process will need to change from one you are familiar with; "a shopper", to one you aren't, "Trucker". It's a transition that will require some time before it becomes second nature.

Not sure how Crete trains new Walmart driver, but at our DC we have the new drivers ride-along with an experienced hand for 2-3 days to help with the learning curve. The absolute best scenario is for you to road-train on the Walmart account. Please ask them about that.

I have written a blog about my first few months as a WallyWagon driver...here is the link: The Freedom of Trucking

Here is the past thread Dave mentioned: A Day In the Life of a Walmart Dedicated Driver.

Good luck and please let me know how else I can help.

0609576001569599274.jpg

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Hi Cecilia, I keep forgetting to comment on your post because I was Schneider Dollar Tree for 3 months. Pros? You will be in great shape. Cons well.... Its just a very tough account. You have to have a want to sling those boxes. Two things for me were. 1. All my runs were regional. Meaning no more than 400 miles typically. I really wanted to drive more. And 2. When unloading you are being unload by Dollar Tree employees. So you can only move as fast as they are. Which was usually hours upon hours at a store. Anywhere from 500 to 4500 boxes of freight to unload. I can go on but won't. You are making the right call. I believe Dollar General runs alittle different. But not by much.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cecelia asked...

Would you explain how you mean 5 stores. So in a normal day you are delivering to 5 different stores? And how does it work when you show up?

I deliver dry or perishable groceries (in a 3-zone reefer) to Walmart Super Stores and/or Sam's Club. A typical dispatch can have anywhere from 1, up to 6 different stores merchandise loaded onto a single trailer; 24-30 pallets. On average there are 3 stops for a dry grocery load, 4 stops for a reefer load. The majority of dry load store stops are live unload, sometimes the last stop is drop and hook. Reefer deliveries are all live unload.

If you read the link I sent describing; "A Day In the Life"; you can see how the process is handled upon arriving at an individual store. I suggest reading both links I sent you if you are truly interested in Walmart Dedicated.

Good luck!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

G Town , About to read the links now. I really appreciate it. Once I read if I have any questions or while in training I hope you wont mind me asking you.

Cecelia asked...

double-quotes-start.png

Would you explain how you mean 5 stores. So in a normal day you are delivering to 5 different stores? And how does it work when you show up?

double-quotes-end.png

I deliver dry or perishable groceries (in a 3-zone reefer) to Walmart Super Stores and/or Sam's Club. A typical dispatch can have anywhere from 1, up to 6 different stores merchandise loaded onto a single trailer; 24-30 pallets. On average there are 3 stops for a dry grocery load, 4 stops for a reefer load. The majority of dry load store stops are live unload, sometimes the last stop is drop and hook. Reefer deliveries are all live unload.

If you read the link I sent describing; "A Day In the Life"; you can see how the process is handled upon arriving at an individual store. I suggest reading both links I sent you if you are truly interested in Walmart Dedicated.

Good luck!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Cecelia, I am happy to answer any of your questions. No problem at all.

Happy reading! 😊

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

I did about a weeks worth of Wal-Mart reefer dedicated out of Corinne when I was with my trainer. It wasn't too bad. They unload you quickly. You just have to be inside to pull off stickers from each pallet. Not a big deal really. Plus you get to shop at a place way cheaper than a truck stop.

A couple classmates are doing family dollar , dollar General, whatever the account is, the pay is good and they actually like the unloads. They said they have fun doing it, but they're tired after each store. But the money seems to make up for it.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

Bird One , thank you for taking the time to comment. What are you doing now if you dont mind me asking? I appreciate your insight.

Hi Cecilia, I keep forgetting to comment on your post because I was Schneider Dollar Tree for 3 months. Pros? You will be in great shape. Cons well.... Its just a very tough account. You have to have a want to sling those boxes. Two things for me were. 1. All my runs were regional. Meaning no more than 400 miles typically. I really wanted to drive more. And 2. When unloading you are being unload by Dollar Tree employees. So you can only move as fast as they are. Which was usually hours upon hours at a store. Anywhere from 500 to 4500 boxes of freight to unload. I can go on but won't. You are making the right call. I believe Dollar General runs alittle different. But not by much.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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