What Is Winter Driving Like In Oregon, Idaho, And Montana?

Topic 26814 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Brian C.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm considering a new job that will introduce me to driving in a few new states; including Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. I'm a bit nervous about it because I have little experience driving in those states and with winter coming, I'm concerned I picked a bad time to make a move. I've been in Idaho a bit but not during snowfall. Most of my winter driving experience was in the flatlands. When I've had to drive through more mountainous areas like Wyoming or Utah and the roads got bad, I shut it down more often than not.

How would you compare Wyoming and Utah to Oregon, Idaho, and Montana? Is it much different? Steeper grades? Do they take good care of the roads when they need plowed? Is truck parking plentiful?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

In Montana, you will find some good mom and pop truck stops. The Town Pumps are good sized truck stops. Use weather and state DOT apps to keep up on road conditions. Watch for signs indicating mandatory chains required. Keep in mind road conditions can change. Once the sun comes up roads can improve. When roads get bad slow down or park it. No load is worth your life. Stay safe.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Washington and Oregon sees ALOT of cold rainy days in the winter, mixed with some freezing rain and snow. The worst of it by far is in and around the mountains - Hood , Raineier etc. I 84 is prone to ice and freezing rain and there are time ODOT will shut it down till its passable.

Bring and ensure you know how to use chains, this winter especially is going to be BAD around the mountains. We have already had more precipitation than usual for the PNW this time of year. I can tell you from experience as a long time PNW resident that the more rain Portland gets usually translates to roughly the same alot of snow in the mountains.

Make sure you have warm clothing, sleeping bag and spare water and food, wayt o cook food and personal sanitation supplies in case you get stuck and cant move.

Alotta good restaurant in the hood area๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘Š

If you need more about the PNW , hit me up.

Moses

I'm considering a new job that will introduce me to driving in a few new states; including Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. I'm a bit nervous about it because I have little experience driving in those states and with winter coming, I'm concerned I picked a bad time to make a move. I've been in Idaho a bit but not during snowfall. Most of my winter driving experience was in the flatlands. When I've had to drive through more mountainous areas like Wyoming or Utah and the roads got bad, I shut it down more often than not.

How would you compare Wyoming and Utah to Oregon, Idaho, and Montana? Is it much different? Steeper grades? Do they take good care of the roads when they need plowed? Is truck parking plentiful?

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brian C.'s Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the replies. I have a feeling I would enjoy that region in the summertime so it might be worth learning to chain up and deal with the brutal winters.

Thanks again.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

If the road conditions are treacherous to the point that you need to run chains for an extended period, best to shut down.

The lower 48 trucking ain't like what you see on TV from Alaska and Canada. Any company worth driving for will not expect you to risk your life, the cargo, their equipment. or your license to run on dangerous roads, beyond most driver's skill level.

Another thing is that the particular state will close a section of roadway if it becomes too dangerous.

Feanor K.'s Comment
member avatar

PNW Winters can be difficult, but the year makes a lot of difference. My first year driving out of North Idaho I only had to chain up once, going into Montana. Made up for by the beautiful scenery and generally good parking (larger cities like Seattle/ Portland still suck) in my opinion.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More