Laziness? Why Don't People Wipe Off Their Lights?

Topic 2682 | Page 1

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Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

As I'm driving and people are constantly passing me because I'm a slow poke, I notice that most truckers apparently don't care to make sure that their trailers lights are visible.

I understand about not wiping off the top marker lights on the trailer because we can't reach them. But what baffles me is how people drive with their brake lights and turn signals completely covered in snow. I've driven through snow many times and the snow does collect on those lights, but some of these trailers look like they haven't been wiped down in days!

What's the deal here? Is this a new breed of lazy drivers? I really can't wrap my head around this. Why is it so difficult to make sure that your lights, license plate light, and license plate are fully visible before you start driving.

What are your thoughts?

Have you noticed this yourself?

It seems to be that if these drivers can't even take a few seconds to wipe down their lights then it would make sense to assume that they probably don't even do walk-arounds or vehicle inspections.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

As I'm driving and people are constantly passing me because I'm a slow poke, I notice that most truckers apparently don't care to make sure that their trailers lights are visible.

I understand about not wiping off the top marker lights on the trailer because we can't reach them. But what baffles me is how people drive with their brake lights and turn signals completely covered in snow. I've driven through snow many times and the snow does collect on those lights, but some of these trailers look like they haven't been wiped down in days!

What's the deal here? Is this a new breed of lazy drivers? I really can't wrap my head around this. Why is it so difficult to make sure that your lights, license plate light, and license plate are fully visible before you start driving.

What are your thoughts?

Have you noticed this yourself?

It seems to be that if these drivers can't even take a few seconds to wipe down their lights then it would make sense to assume that they probably don't even do walk-arounds or vehicle inspections.

I'm with you Daniel. I would have to also assume (I know, bad word) you are correct to think they don't get out and check their equipment before leaving in the morning or when stopping for the evening.

Totally baffles me to see this.

Ernie

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Ernie when most people assume they make an a$$.....you know the saying but in this case you are completely correct. They did not do a walk around. They could have 8 flats on their trailer and have a monkey doing "it" on the DOT bumper with a lot lizard and they would have no clue.

No its not the "New Drivers" that are doing it. I have seen new and old school drivers. Company and O/O's. Does not matter.

Ernie remember when I talked to ya on the phone while back and told you how I just about froze in that first cold snap at -53 degrees? Yes i was taking care of my truck even during the most miserable weather because it's my job and because without my truck i don't make money even though it's a company truck.

Seems people just dont care any more or getting to that point. Should make trucking an apprenticeship for 6 months BEFORE you even get a job that way when people looked at you they know you really want to be in the drivers seat and you know what you are doing.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

In bad weather, or if we'd been on dirty roads, when we did our pretrip, it was with a whisk broom in hand...to brush off the lights...

ThinksTooMuch's Comment
member avatar

It's just the average person mentality. Do the minimum and don't use the brain that took our species tens of thousands of years to evolve.

Roadkill (aka:Guy DeCou)'s Comment
member avatar
a monkey doing "it" on the DOT bumper with a lot lizard

I just about spit on my keyboard when I read that...rofl-2.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Flatwater 's Comment
member avatar

I followed a hay hauler this morning and had the same gripe; Oh-Dark-Thirty, dry blowing snow, tail lights all snowed over. I tried to hail him over the CB, but it wasn't on or he was still asleep.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Joe S. (a.k.a. The Blue 's Comment
member avatar

I do a walk around every morning, evening, or both. Usually both. I check the engine everyday. On my walk around in the evening, I don't lift the hood, but I check for leaks.

As far as lights go. Let me tell you one little story.

I was at a Pilot fueling one day. It had snowed the night before and with help of salt the roads were pretty mushy and sloppy. Not only were my headlights dirty, I was sure my tail lights were also.

I finished my fueling and doing my windows and headlights, I walked around to the back to wipe my tail lights. The truck stop was very busy, I admit. But there was a truck behind me. Two as a matter of fact. The guy opened his window and yelled. Can't you see how busy it is and we are waiting. Don't worry about those, just move.

I cleaned them fast, not as clean as I would have liked, but I was getting dirty looks from more than one driver. And yes, I was the only driver I saw walking around the back to check their lights.

Maybe I should have pulled up away from the pumps and opened them up. But cleaning them only took maybe a minute. After that, I pulled off and left. I really didn't want to get in the truck, start it, pull up, shut it off and getting out again. But oh well.

I have seen trucker after trucker pull in to only clean their windshields and no one say anything. I take a few extra seconds to clean my tail lights and get yelled at.

When I was first into trucking 30+ years ago, you would have never seen a truck take up a fueling isle just to clean his windshield. They would have been mobbed by the drivers behind him. Pull through then stop to clean so the trucks behind can fuel. Maybe I should have been looking at it that way.

Oh well. Lesson learned.

Keep it safe out here, the life you save might be your own. Joe S.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Larry E.'s Comment
member avatar

As a skateboard hauler, every 150 miles or 3 hrs I have to stop to check the load and tires. I leave the lights on to make sure they are still working and will always take a swipe at them with my glove if dirty, salty or snowy. Anything I can do to make sure the LEO'S and DOT officers think I am "doing that little extra" that could make the difference between a stop or citation. Don't know if it really makes a difference to them, but it makes me more confident. I also tend to be a bit anal about the small things - just a bit OCD.smile.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Troy V.'s Comment
member avatar

As a skateboard hauler, every 150 miles or 3 hrs I have to stop to check the load and tires. I leave the lights on to make sure they are still working and will always take a swipe at them with my glove if dirty, salty or snowy. Anything I can do to make sure the LEO'S and DOT officers think I am "doing that little extra" that could make the difference between a stop or citation. Don't know if it really makes a difference to them, but it makes me more confident. I also tend to be a bit anal about the small things - just a bit OCD.smile.gif

I do the exact same thing. Anytime I am stopped for anything even if its a rest area to take a **** I walk around and wipe them off. I think thats a pretty good habit to have.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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