Cypress Flatbed?

Topic 27945 | Page 1

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DJames's Comment
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It looks like with TMC and Prime not hiring out of FL currrently that my best option is probably Cypress out of Jax. I saw a couple threads on them a few years ago but thought I would ask again in case there is someone out there who has direct experience with them. The only negative that I have found online were that they used to have old equipment but I believe that has changed over the years.

Old School's Comment
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Cypress is an excellent choice. They run a great operation. I've reccomend them for years to people living in Florida. Go for it!

Navypoppop's Comment
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DJames,

Welcome to the forum. There is also CT, a division of Commercial Carriers located in Tampa and Jacksonville. They offer a Southeast regional division that is usually home 2-3 times a week and weekends. They operate IH and Mack conventional w/sleepers. Most loads are pre-loaded and tarped ready to go. They are a decent company and have a few different companies under the CCC umbrella like dry van , reefer and tanker.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

DJames's Comment
member avatar

Cypress is an excellent choice. They run a great operation. I've reccomend them for years to people living in Florida. Go for it!

Thank you! It seems that Cypress will probably be the way to go. I put in an application in January knowing that I probably would not be ready to make the move until May just to test the waters. I was approved and recieved a conditional prehire so it is looking lke the path is clear for me to Cypress, though I will need to put in another app given that 30 days has passed since my previous app. I also spoke with a recruiter there, Clay, who seemed was very informative and seemed to be a straight shooter. I just need to knock out the CDL learner's permit and get a DOT physical but I don't anticipate any issues there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

DJames's Comment
member avatar

DJames,

Welcome to the forum. There is also CT, a division of Commercial Carriers located in Tampa and Jacksonville.

Hello Navy,

I realized that I neglected to mention in my post above that I would need schooling. I checked out the Comcar operation a while back but they said they were not recruiting inexperienced drivers at the time. I believe they did train at one point but now looking at their website I cannot find anything on training, possibly that has been discontinued?

Navypoppop's Comment
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Sorry DJames,

I didn't know that you needed schooling from the beginning. Your looking into Cypress will be a good choice.

DJames's Comment
member avatar

Sorry DJames,

I didn't know that you needed schooling from the beginning. Your looking into Cypress will be a good choice.

Thanks for the input, It is looking like it will probably be Cypress.

DJames's Comment
member avatar

Cypress is an excellent choice. They run a great operation. I've reccomend them for years to people living in Florida. Go for it!

Oldschool, Just had a couple more thing to run by you if I might:

Cypress is still hiring and states that they have a very strong customer base. However I have been reading in some places that flatbed freight is being hit worse with the slowdown than reefer etc. I don't know if that is just with regards to O/O (to me O/O seems like a risky proposition at any time) or if this is affecting company drivers as well or if it is just a few anecdotal stories and there is no particular concern with flatbed. As a flatbed driver are you seeing any evidence of that?

I am looking at probably late May to Mid June to go in to Cypress CDL school at this point. I could always postpone that for a few months or even a year if necessary. Do you think now is a bad or risky time to go into flatbed as a company driver? As always your input is greatly appreciated.

-Don

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I have been reading in some places that flatbed freight is being hit worse with the slowdown than reefer etc. I don't know if that is just with regards to O/O (to me O/O seems like a risky proposition at any time) or if this is affecting company drivers as well or if it is just a few anecdotal stories and there is no particular concern with flatbed. As a flatbed driver are you seeing any evidence of that?

I have been extremely busy. My last 3 months I've run a little more than 35,000 miles. I'm finishing this month with over 12,000 miles.

I'm gonna let you in on a secret...

You get in there and prove to be productive, and you'll never be begging for loads. Ignore all the hype. Most of it comes from people who don't even realize they are not very productive. Those type drivers will get passed over for loads when times are tough.

It doesn't matter if you're a rookie or an old hand - any solid driver will be treated differently than the slackers. Get in there and "git er done." You may never realize that freight is slow. I've actually never seen it slow down to where it affected my pay negatively. I stay busy all the time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
DJames's Comment
member avatar

I have been extremely busy. My last 3 months I've run a little more than 35,000 miles. I'm finishing this month with over 12,000 miles.

That is definitely encouraging to hear!

You get in there and prove to be productive, and you'll never be begging for loads. Ignore all the hype. Most of it comes from people who don't even realize they are not very productive. Those type drivers will get passed over for loads when times are tough.

Yeah, it seems that with all professions there are whiners and trucking is not an exception. These people are generally the last to realize they are the problem.

It doesn't matter if you're a rookie or an old hand - any solid driver will be treated differently than the slackers. Get in there and "git er done." You may never realize that freight is slow. I've actually never seen it slow down to where it affected my pay negatively. I stay busy all the time.

This is also good to hear, I currently work in the public sector where hard work is rewarded not with raises, advancements etc. If you are a hard worker in my current workplace, you can expect to doing the work that the slackers don't do with no added compensation, recognition, etc. It will be nice to get into a field where a hard work ethic is rewarded.

Thank you again sir!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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