Thinking Of Jumping Ship From Current Carrier.

Topic 28232 | Page 2

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Apollyon's Comment
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Thanks for the suggestion OS, I'll give the podcast a listen. I guess I'm just frustrated by the lack of communication, but I suppose 6 more months couldn't hurt.

Old School's Comment
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I guess I'm just frustrated by the lack of communication

That's understandable. Trucking is very unique. Communication is important, but it's different in this career. Most jobs have a manager of some sort right there nearby. If we have an issue we can go talk it out with them. It's not that way in trucking. Our DMs are extremely busy, and they don't want us calling them. That was something I had to get used to myself. Eventually I learned to communicate primarily on the Quallcomm. It's very effective now that I understand how and why they want it done that way.

That's one of the problems with detention pay. Oftentimes new drivers don't realise they have to document their wait times on the Quallcomm. I seldom get detained, but if I get to a shipper or receiver that's not ready for me, I am required to send in a macro stating that "detention is likely." That automatically sets things in motion. My detention will get paid if I follow the proper procedure. If I fail to document it with the proper message it's not going to happen. It won't matter how many phone calls I make.

Learning the little idiosyncrasies of this business takes time and commitment. That's why you want to commit for that first year. It's a critical time period in your career. Jumping ship only puts you into a new learning curve. Each company has their own way of doing things. You want to learn to excel at your chosen employer. Otherwise, switching companies each time you have a conflict becomes a systematic practice that only keeps you from learning the secrets of success at trucking.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
William P.'s Comment
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Don't jump ship so quickly, If you made it 6 months you're halfway there. Use the time to learn the business. From what you've said it sounds like you took a lease option as opposed to company driver. I was a company driver and took trainees, while I had them I tried to teach them the company side of the business, I also advised them to take a year learn the business then decide if they want to do the lease. I personally always like that when things broke on the truck it wasn't my responsibility to fix and they seemed to fix it quickly. As was stated the larger companies sign contracts with the shippers and receivers that vary from company to company, I remember 1 company was 1 minute after checking was that ing and 1 was 4 hours and several didn't pay detention. One other thing is that the driver didn't receive detention until the shipper or receiver paid it to the company therefore it could be a while. Ask questions and try to get answers, and you and your DM can't get along ask for a change. I had a lot of disagreement with mine but after I put forth the effort to show her I was going to be a good performer we got along great, we even became friends. I suggest finishing out your time, and read the contract you signed you may find to owe a lot of money for leaving early. One last thing I went to work with a man who had jumped companies so much few companies would consider him for Employment. He was happy to finally find a company that gave him a chance, he said he was regretting the moving around. You've picked a good career and there room for lots of enjoyment, but it is hard work. GOOD LUCK

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
IDMtnGal 's Comment
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Howdy young man!

Yesterday I got my pay statement. It had a $201.00 detention on it, with the trip number. I don't remember having any detention recently, so looked up the trip. The company finally got paid by the shipper on a load I hauled 7 weeks ago....no wonder I didn't remember it!

If you are a company driver, can you go solo now? I drove team during 88-93 and that's what I expected to do when I came back out in Sep 2014. I went thru an independent school and then got hired by a 4 truck company. They hired my brother from England where, after his training, he was put in "Recovery " of lease trucks and trailers. England would fly him or put him on a driver's truck that was going near where a truck was abandoned. At 6 mths he left and I drove with him cause insurance said I had no experience. We ran team 2.5 mths and then we went solo. I've been solo since and won't go team. If you can go solo, that may help you to feel better about what you can control. Hang in there.

Laura

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Viking's Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't recommend going solo while remaining OTR with England.

When I was still OTR ( 2 years ago) team trucks where paid 40 cpm. Solos were 29cpm.

My recommendation would be to apply to a dedicated fleet near your place of residence, especially if they have a solo fleet there most of the dedicated fleets only ask for 3 to 6 months experience.

Also, I can guarantee your under contract. If you leave now, you will receive a bill.

If you are having DM problems, seek out your DMs boss and work from there. Assuming you have your ducks in a row you.

I've been with England for 2.5 years. Been solo all but 4 months of that on a dedicated account.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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