Puppies/Dogs On The Road Questions

Topic 2919 | Page 1

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R. Picante's Comment
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I'm be come a solo driver in next two weeks. I've been thinking about a pet n snake just seem like to much with all the special care. So back to thinking about a dog. Been long time since I've had one but how hard is it to train a dog while in a truck? Don't wanna look back n see #1 and #2 on floor of my truck! Thinking about a Siberia husky puppy. Good way to work out as well going for a run with the pup and provide companionship. And another thing water bowl?!?! Think it would be bad ideal spilling everywhere.. and about bathing your pet?

so how did you train your pet and any compromise that have to be made for for dog? Or anything else would be useful to know as well. And yess I'm allowed to have a pet with a deposit down.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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Training dog for a truck is no different than house training. I love having my dog with me. So far as potty training a dog it's easy really. As a puppy you have to stop more often for them to use the bathroom. Remember animals depend on you. Basically you are taking a child to raise in the truck. They have to be taught.

This website has a list of trucking companies that allow pets so check that out.

List of Trucking Companies That Allow Pets

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Food and water is no problem. You can see part of his bowl in the picture. It's just a plastic double bowl. To avoid spilling just don't fill them completely full. About have way will be good.

A husky? You know how big they get right? And how much they shed? My advice is to get a dog around 20 lbs. Easy to take care of and you can carry them if need be. Big dogs need alot of exercise which they will not get since you will be driving almost all the time. Think about size and living space. Putting a big dog in a truck is like putting a horse in your bathroom at home. Not a lot of room left over. As you can see my dog is not very big. About 25 lbs. But he is more than big enough to keep someone from breaking into my truck.

And for God sakes always use a leash. For one its the law almost every where now a days and two it keeps you pet safe. I know you have seen some drivers take their dog out and did not use a leash....shame on them. Bad pet ower. Dogs can and do run around when outside and it only takes one second for the dog to get ran over by a truck in the parking lot. Can't be mad at the driver. That is what a leash is for.

You can get a leash the rolls itself up and will go out 20 to 30 feet. Plenty of length for the dog to run and do its business.

6 string rhythm's Comment
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I've also noticed a lot of companies have restrictions for dogs/pets based on weight. Huskies get pretty big, relatively speaking. Might wanna double check on your company's weight limit for dogs, if they have any.

Deb R.'s Comment
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GuyJax, your dog is adorable! It sounds like you are a responsible owner too, good to hear! My dog is about 60 lbs., and I'm wondering if it will be difficult getting her in and out of the cab; she won't be able to jump that far, she's kinda stumpy.

Free Spirit ( AKA #Hashta's Comment
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Also, you may want to think about the breed and their habits....example....CHEWERS!! That's just not a puppy thing. Once you figure out what breed/size is going to work best for the both of you.....go to your local shelter and adopt. They make the best companions and you are saving a life!! smile.gif

Free Spirit ( AKA #Hashta's Comment
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Oh...Guyjax....that's a little cutie there. What breed is he?

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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He is a boxer jack Russell mix. Rescued him from a shelter. I don't believe in buying a full breed dog. The best pets come from shelters.

60 lbs is going to be a big dog for a truck. Mark out an 8x10 square on the floor and then sit in it next to your dog. That is the amount of room you will have. Now add in seats and bed and cabinets and you have less room.

Free Spirit ( AKA #Hashta's Comment
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I love rescue dogs, it's like "they know" you rescued them. I don't believe in buying dogs there are too many puppy mills and overbred mothers out there...but I will not get on that subject...it makes my bp go up.

"Bail Money" ( in my profile pic) is a rescue. His size is going to be an issue I'm aware and I'm stressing because there was not enough research on size limits allowed on trucks. I'm stuck between a rock and hard place and trying to find some wiggle room. Hopefully there will be a happy ending to this story. We will see.

Starcar's Comment
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When decideing on a dog for your truck, remember....SHEDDING !!!! I swear, TSB's JRT would shed a dog a week...and it you have carpet, it will stick like its been glued down. It gets in everything, and you will be cleaning and changing your ari circulation vents every few days. If you have a long haired dog, or a dog that blows its coat, or will shed, consider taking it to a groomer, and having a kennel clip done. that way, in the summer, your dog is much more comfortable, and you will have less hair to deal with.

Chris L.'s Comment
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My current company doesn't allow dogs but planning on going otr and will be only applying at companies with a pet policy. I have a 12 pound chihuahua mix also a shelter rescue. Wish I could post pics, not sure how to do it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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