ELD And DPF Emissions Questions

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Brian K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello my trucking compadres,

I have been out of trucking for many years and I have a few questions. This is more for my own knowledge than anything else and I have googled the questions but received different answers so I thought someone who has been through it can give me more concise answers. 1) When did ELD’s come into existence and when did they become mandatory? 2) What year trucks are ELD exempt? 3) When did the first emission controls start, EGR etc...? 4) What year trucks are free of any DEF, DPF, or EGR controls, not deleted but original? 5) If your truck is originally free of emission controls, not deleted, where can you drive or not drive the trucks, include Canada? 6) If you have your truck deleted, is it illegal? 7) Would the same state consider a deleted truck illegal and a original emission free truck legal? 8) Does DOT check for emissions controls or if your truck has been deleted. 9) Isn’t it easy to tell if your truck has been deleted by how much soot comes out the exhaust?

If you have time, I’d like you hear your comments.

Brian

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Brian it’s not that hard. ELD’s became mandatory Dec 16, 2019. Their was an AOBRD before that been around with some companies since 2010. Any truck 1999 and older is exempt for now.

Emissions is a long road but basically anything pre 2004 should not have anything on it. They started with EGR systems and kept progressing toward the current DPF/SCR systems we have currently.

The deleting issue gets a bit dicey. Technically it is illegal, that said the only state I’m aware of that does any checking is Ca. Most states tend too just not address the issue. My carrier actually had me sign an affidavit my truck is Ca compliant, and are now rumoring to have us renew it at certain time intervals. No one has officially said anything to me about that yet. There are a few ways to delete one and isn’t real noticable. Alot of emissions trucks are out here on the road that are deleted.

If one is deleted you can never take it back to a dealer. They will not work on them. So if you have one you need a good mechanic. My mechanic is very good at it, has been doing it for years. He claims the truck will actually come alive after being deleted. Another issue is you will limit your resale options.

Hopefully I hit the high points for you.

Brian K.'s Comment
member avatar

That's some good info to know. I been reading a lot about the emissions controls and getting conflicting information. The one common theme is it can cause your engine to fail prematurely. I been thinking about buying a used truck, nothing soon, but it would be a real bummer if the engine had to be rebuilt in the first year or so due to the emissions on the truck. I am also assuming you can idle, trucks without emissions controls or deleted, in all states except Ca. to say warn or cool without the police citing you in a truck stop. I'm really not concerned with ELD's. I believe they are here to stay and doubt I will buy older than 1999 if I even go that route.

Thanks for the info

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Idling is the biggest problem with emmisions trucks. I have a apu on mine so I don’t idle the big motor. There are some states that outlaw idling, New york and Pa come to mind. I don’t go there very often so I don’t know how enforced it is.

I don’t know how the emissions really effect the overall health of the motor, I do know it doesn’t allow it to breath as well.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Brian K.'s Comment
member avatar

I enjoy reading all your comments and this old trucker is learns something new here every time. I say old trucker because I haven't driven OTR or any semi's for over 24 years. I kept my CDL current during all that time. Now that I have retired from a desk job after 24 years, I started searching for a driving position a couple months ago but no one would hire me because of my lack of recent experience and those that might of did not hire out of my area, Fort Lauderdale. Even offer to buy a truck and lease to a company and was refused as well for the same reason.

After a few months of searching and not getting anywhere, I was offered a job with "Stevens Transport, Inc" today. I spoke to the recruiter a couple of times but today, over the phone, we discuss my application and he said everything looks good. A few minutes later he sent me the official "Welcome to Stevens Transport, Inc" letter via email. I have a start date of January 11th. There will be some training involved and a few weeks with a driver trainer. I am excited and nervous at the same time, but feel confident I can so this. I'll probably be the oldest student driver there at 67 years old but hoping my past driving experience of 18 years and racking up 1.5+ million miles during the 80's and 90's will come back to me like riding a bike. Hope so!

Thanks for all the info and keep an eye out on the "CDL Training Diaries" section. I may start a blog there to let drivers know what Stevens training is like in 2021.

Brian

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

PJ's girlfriend drove at Steven's. I know several former drivers from there. I would continue looking.

Brian K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the update but I need to get some recent experience. I have been politely turned down by many companies because of not having any recent experience or they tell me they are not hiring from my area, I dare not turn down a job offer after looking for the past 3 months. I know money is important to everyone but right now experience is more important to me right now. I'm easy to get along with and will see how things go. As soon as I get past the prelim and not being sent home for any reason, I'll start a blog on the "CDL Training Diaries" with my experience there. I'm excited and hope things go well!

Brian

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Brian packrat is correct. My gf started there. I hate to bad mouth anyone, but what we went through was beyond normal and with their restructing I cannot in good concience recommend them. I understand your situation and wish you well.

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