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Iron9s's Comment
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Anyway... What is different about a truck that pulls tankers compared to a truck that pulls dry van or reefer? Does it have different gadgets inside?

I am a trainer. I'd like to train tanker drivers too eventually. Do tanker drivers get longer loads during tnt like we do in reefer? I don't think I'd like to train a student while doing a lot of short loads.

You mentioned taking your 10 hours often at shippers/receivers/tank wash places. What kind of accommodations do these places have? Bathrooms? Do they usually have enough parking spaces available?

And "bankers hours"? Were you being sarcastic, or do you you really pretty much keep to a steady schedule?

No difference with the truck itself, other than having hydraulic lines run from the PTO/Intransit heat lines running through the coolant reservoir/eco heater mounted on the catwalk. Inside you will have your missile arm switch for the eco heater and your pto switch. As for Freightliner vs Peterbilt, you will want a Freightliner. The Freightliners have a raised 5th wheel which is helpful when unloading since you need the product to flow to the back. Of course when you pop the trailer brake it does dip but, the more the better. The Peterbilt's have the low profile 5th wheel so suckers like me will occasionally have to lower the landing gear, stop pumping, detach from the trailer, raise it up more, then pump. In the winter its ok because it will warm you up, but raising a trailer in the heat of Georgia sucks.

As a trainer you are not going to get the long loads just because. We run a little different here in this division. We only have about 300 drivers and there are only 5 fleet managers. 1 company FM , 2 OTR FM's, 1 for regional out of PRIDEC, and 1 Northeast regional that also has a few OTR guys on his board. If you are Company and a trainer, you will get trips out to California and Utah, but they are not consistent. Since we run a tight circle, you really don't get to stretch your legs. Training in Tanker usually takes at least an extra month than it does in reefer/flatbed. Also, depending on your FM once you are on a load you can/will get pre-planned. My FM would be throwing pre-plans on me before I grabbed my original load. He knew I liked to run, so he took full advantage of it.

At all the tank washes they have driver lounges, so restrooms and vending machines. OJSK/OJLAN and a few others have showers, that are clean, as well as washing machines. As for parking, the only place that gets packed sometimes is OJSK. Since there are a lot of loads out of AAK down the road, OJSK sometimes falls behind on clean tanks, or AAK has all their pickups at lets say 0700 so everyone just hangs out. Personally, if OJSK has a clean tank for me to bring to AAK for my load in the AM, I'll bring it over to AAK, drop it there, and park outside the gate. You always have to bring a clean to AAK to pick up your load. If the latter is your plan, always tell the person at the front desk when they ask "what time is your load" just say "now". For some reason they like to distribute tanks to people on their own terms. Don't give them that luxury.

I say bankers hours because most deliveries are scheduled for 0700-0800. So a lot of times depending on how you run your hours you can get on a schedule. I know how long it takes to get from each shipper to each receiver so for the most part, I am up and rolling at 0300 and park at 1500. This always gets me to my 90 ontime, and time to get to a tank wash, grab a clean tank or live wash and to where I need to be to pick up the next morning. Now since we always have plenty of time to get to our 90's, and if I know they are 24/7, I call and see if they can take me early and if not, if they O/N parking. Some places do not have O/N parking, and are not 24/7, they will let you come early park in the spot you have to unload if you are the first on the list that day. You will unload early very often. I've unload 36 hours prior, and plenty the day before my appointment. Some receivers you have to plan on detention. Hershey, if you bring Palm Oil to them, either they take you right away, or it will be 10-36 hours. Yup, always a good time. Nestle is the same way.

One thing I was thinking of while unloading in Montreal this morning is make sure you have some comfy composite toe/waterproof/oil slip resistant/insulate boots. Standing in the snow up there for a hour behind the pump I count my blessings I have them. Don't get steel toe, you don't need steel and they get cold quick. Also, I have 2 Carhartt bibs. Once for summer and one that is insulated for winter. They help for keeping you clean, warm in the winter, and if you take a palm oil bath, at least you had something to protect your clothes. oh, and a poncho for when it rains.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

RealDiehl's Comment
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Wow, Iron9s, you seem to have a huge wealth of knowledge when it comes to pulling tankers. I am grateful! "Driver in training", my a$$! 😉

You mentioned Montreal. Is a passport required for tanker division?

And the most obvious question I forgot to ask you: Is a hazmat endorsement required?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Iron9s's Comment
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Wow, Iron9s, you seem to have a huge wealth of knowledge when it comes to pulling tankers. I am grateful! "Driver in training", my a$$! 😉

You mentioned Montreal. Is a passport required for tanker division?

And the most obvious question I forgot to ask you: Is a hazmat endorsement required?

Eh, always in training. I’m inquisitive so always learning. I always ask something about tanking to every tanker driver. Doesn’t matter if they are here at Prime or another company. Always want to make my life easier out here. I don’t like the feeling of being helpless in a situation when it comes to my job, so I will always try to learn everything I can. I may not be able to fix every issue permanently on the spot, but I want to be able to at the least find or know way to complete the task at hand. When I am able to get that issue fixed permanently I will then question the hell out of who ever fixes my issue so I know what to do the next time.

A passport is not necessary, unless you want to go to Canada. If you don’t have a passport, they just won’t route you there. There are always loads going to Ontario (Toronto area) and Montreal. They are great miles for company drivers, so if you are company, and want to train as company, I would suggest getting your passport so you and your student can knock out more miles quicker.

For hazmat, you know, I can’t for the life of me remember if it is required or not. I do have mine, but we don’t haul anything that warrants a hazmat.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

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