Have Texas CLP

Topic 29698 | Page 1

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John T.'s Comment
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I have my Texas CLP in hand failed the incab inspection. I drove for about 7 or 8 year prior to 2012 any suggestions on how to proceed? Thanks John

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear that, John. Since you haven't driven a truck for a while, you may have a full refresher course ahead of you.

First, if you take a look at the top left corner of each page, there are three bars. Touch on them to see a full table of contents to this web site.

To get you started, here are a few links:

Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! A Must See!

Pre-Trip Inspection Study Guide

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Jared H.'s Comment
member avatar

Last day of CDL school for me today 🎉

I would 2nd this. What I did was print out all the pictures of the pre-trio inspection and taped 3x5 cards with our states inspection wording provided to us my our schools instructors and used the pictures and 3x5 cards as flash cards.

I had to learn all the parts (I’m not mechanical at all- like I had no idea for example what a brake chamber even was 😂) then I learned what each part did (why is important the brake chamber isn’t cracked, dented or leaking) and this helped me tons.

My pre-trip evaluation test our instructors give us to graduate (simulated DOL test) from Air Leak checks to the rear cargo door- I only missed 7 words. The pictures and 3x5 cards worked great!

Beat of luck!

Sorry to hear that, John. Since you haven't driven a truck for a while, you may have a full refresher course ahead of you.

First, if you take a look at the top left corner of each page, there are three bars. Touch on them to see a full table of contents to this web site.

To get you started, here are a few links:

Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! A Must See!

Pre-Trip Inspection Study Guide

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John T.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear that, John. Since you haven't driven a truck for a while, you may have a full refresher course ahead of you.

First, if you take a look at the top left corner of each page, there are three bars. Touch on them to see a full table of contents to this web site.

To get you started, here are a few links:

Pre-Trip Inspection - My Way! A Must See!

Pre-Trip Inspection Study Guide

Thank you for the info. Will help me to memorize.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey John, you are going to find some difficulties when trying to land a job. It used to be that if you had a CDL you were going to have an easy time with finding employment. Now days it is more important that you have "recent experience" or a certificate showing that you have had "recent training" equaling 160 hours. You don't have either one of those.

More than likely you will need to pay the money to attend a private truck driving academy or sign on for one of the many Paid CDL Training Programs. Things have probably changed too much for you to just show up with a fresh shiny new CDL and expect folks to be clamoring after you with job offers. You are going to have to satisfy the insurance companies requirements for employment.

I know that is probably not what you were wanting to hear, but you are going to find there are very specific methods that open the doors into this career. A few people find alternate routes to getting in, but you are going to be very limited by just going and getting a new CDL on your own.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

John, like Jared says, it's a matter of knowing the part's name, what it does, and what it's made of. Then know what possible damage there could be.

This is simple: be able to point to something and name it.

Know what that thingy is made of and what it does: Alternators are metal and make electricity, Coolant reservoirs are plastic and hold coolant.

Everything is "securely mounted". Metal things can be cracked or dented. Plastic & rubber things can be cracked, cut or leaking (fluids or air)

So even though there are possibly over 100 things you need to know, it's really much simpler than memorizing Lincoln's Gettysburg Address like you had to do in high school.

As for the in-cab, I'll bet you failed on the air brake part. That does require some memorization.

The basic outline looks like this:

  • Brake operation: Trailer and Service (Foot brake)
  • Air System leaks
  • Low Pressure Warning

But the details are so important you'll need to memorize this part.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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