Questions About Local Driving

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Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
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Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions?

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Depends on where you live. If you are near a large city then there are probably lots of local jobs available. The hiring standards for local driving jobs are usually higher than for otr jobs (as they should be, since local driving tends to be more challenging than otr). They usually require one year of class A driving experience (driving a tractor-trailer). So in that sense, yes they are tougher to get. However, local companies are, more and more, hiring inexperienced CDL holders and training them "their way." I had multiple offers from local companies when I finished CDL school.

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What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver?

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I work 5 days per week, and average 11 hours per shift. I know guys that do four 12 hour shifts per week with extra work available if wanted. I would say 5 days a week and 55-60 hours is about typical.

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What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver?

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As far as one can go and return before their clock runs out. About 300 miles or so.

I am now in my mid-50's and consider myself "too old" for that OTR s_hit. I consider life in a sleeper at my age to be a hardship. I would hope that some employers would be sympathetic to older people who might seek local driving due to age considerations and understand that the long-haul stuff/sleeper crap is generally for the young and the bold. Being a service Veteran I might get some slack there too. Yes, I would be willing to train the company's way to get preferential close-to-home employment.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

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Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions? What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver? What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver? Are there plenty of good Local Driving opportunities in Texas right now?

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Maybe I can help, I drive local with a mid-sized company of about 90 drivers.

Yes, most carriers want 2+ years experience otr.

I work 3am until I get done. Sometimes i get done earlier and sometimes later but I have to be parked and off the clock by 5pm.

All depends on my schedule for that day, anywhere from 300 to 550 miles. I am in either Atlanta GA or Charlotte NC and sometimes I am in both on same day.

Don't know about Texas.. Don't live there.

What experience level do they want for entering a REGIONAL position vs OTR? Could REGIONAL be a good stepping stone to get to LOCAL for an old fart? I don't feel I have the stamina for OTR.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions?

double-quotes-end.png

Depends on where you live. If you are near a large city then there are probably lots of local jobs available. The hiring standards for local driving jobs are usually higher than for otr jobs (as they should be, since local driving tends to be more challenging than otr). They usually require one year of class A driving experience (driving a tractor-trailer). So in that sense, yes they are tougher to get. However, local companies are, more and more, hiring inexperienced CDL holders and training them "their way." I had multiple offers from local companies when I finished CDL school.

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What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver?

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I work 5 days per week, and average 11 hours per shift. I know guys that do four 12 hour shifts per week with extra work available if wanted. I would say 5 days a week and 55-60 hours is about typical.

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What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver?

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As far as one can go and return before their clock runs out. About 300 miles or so.

Some megas like Schneider offer local positions too, it's not just the local mom-and-pops. Some also offer dedicated routes. Not having to go all over the nation into unknown territory would seem more comforting to me. Sticking around southwestern states like Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Louisiana and Kansas doesn't seem to bad for regional. The weather is favorable most of the time. No serious mountain driving or severe winter driving usually. Being based in Texas and driving regional even would keep me out of the nastiest places in the Lower 48 to drive, Lalaland, CA and the Rust Belt. I gather regional usually doesn't extend beyond three state lines. There is still that nasty sleeper and those nasty choke-n-pukes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI9fq6XOkKM

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

Oops, i forgot...

I love that radio commercial I once heard for a freight carrier that stated "We have no sleepers in our fleet." I'm therefore a "Day Cab Dreamer". dancing-dog.gif

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Aren't log books only required for interstate commerce? I figure many local jobs will be intrastate only.

Where do you come up with this? It's not factual.

There is an exception to the ELD rule for a small number of local jobs. Drivers using this exception must be done working within 14 consecutive hours, must return to their original starting point, and must remain within a 150 air-mile radius from their starting point.

Another important thing to realize about most local jobs is that they aren't entry level jobs. They almost always require experience.

I would hope that some employers would be sympathetic to older people who might seek local driving due to age considerations and understand that the long-haul stuff/sleeper crap is generally for the young and the bold.

You are silly, and naive. Employers don't hire folks based on their sympathetic leanings. I guess I must be old and bold, but I am sure not lazy. I love the over the road lifestyle.

You will more than likely need some OTR experience to land a local driving job. Your career will benefit from that experience too. You better starve yourself for a couple of years before jumping into this career. That one year of OTR experience you are going to need is likely to ruin your health. That nasty food those toothless waitresses will be serving up at the truck stop is gonna cause you to balloon into a blimp and clog your arteries so bad that you won't be able to get any sympathy from those folks that are hiring for local jobs. I just don't know how you are going to do this. There are just too many barriers for you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate Commerce:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Breydan W.'s Comment
member avatar

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Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions? What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver? What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver? Are there plenty of good Local Driving opportunities in Texas right now?

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Maybe I can help, I drive local with a mid-sized company of about 90 drivers.

Yes, most carriers want 2+ years experience otr.

I work 3am until I get done. Sometimes i get done earlier and sometimes later but I have to be parked and off the clock by 5pm.

All depends on my schedule for that day, anywhere from 300 to 550 miles. I am in either Atlanta GA or Charlotte NC and sometimes I am in both on same day.

Don't know about Texas.. Don't live there.

double-quotes-end.png

What experience level do they want for entering a REGIONAL position vs OTR? Could REGIONAL be a good stepping stone to get to LOCAL for an old fart? I don't feel I have the stamina for OTR.

Regional is not much different than OTR. Keeps you closer to your terminal , so better home time than OTR, but you're still sleeping in the truck. The hiring standards for regional and OTR are no different, generally speaking.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Breydan W.'s Comment
member avatar

Aren't log books only required for interstate commerce? I figure many local jobs will be intrastate only.

Almost everyone uses an eld now. Why would you want to have to fill out a paper log? Eld is much easier.

Interstate Commerce:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Breydan W.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Depends on where you live. If you are near a large city then there are probably lots of local jobs available. The hiring standards for local driving jobs are usually higher than for otr jobs (as they should be, since local driving tends to be more challenging than otr). They usually require one year of class A driving experience (driving a tractor-trailer). So in that sense, yes they are tougher to get. However, local companies are, more and more, hiring inexperienced CDL holders and training them "their way." I had multiple offers from local companies when I finished CDL school.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I work 5 days per week, and average 11 hours per shift. I know guys that do four 12 hour shifts per week with extra work available if wanted. I would say 5 days a week and 55-60 hours is about typical.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

As far as one can go and return before their clock runs out. About 300 miles or so.

double-quotes-end.png

I am now in my mid-50's and consider myself "too old" for that OTR s_hit. I consider life in a sleeper at my age to be a hardship. I would hope that some employers would be sympathetic to older people who might seek local driving due to age considerations and understand that the long-haul stuff/sleeper crap is generally for the young and the bold. Being a service Veteran I might get some slack there too. Yes, I would be willing to train the company's way to get preferential close-to-home employment.

You might get preferential treatment for you military servive, but not for your age!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Breydan W.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Are local driving positions with carriers tougher to get than OTR positions?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Depends on where you live. If you are near a large city then there are probably lots of local jobs available. The hiring standards for local driving jobs are usually higher than for otr jobs (as they should be, since local driving tends to be more challenging than otr). They usually require one year of class A driving experience (driving a tractor-trailer). So in that sense, yes they are tougher to get. However, local companies are, more and more, hiring inexperienced CDL holders and training them "their way." I had multiple offers from local companies when I finished CDL school.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

What is the typical work schedule of a LOCAL driver?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I work 5 days per week, and average 11 hours per shift. I know guys that do four 12 hour shifts per week with extra work available if wanted. I would say 5 days a week and 55-60 hours is about typical.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

What is the greatest distance from home traveled on the job for a LOCAL driver?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

As far as one can go and return before their clock runs out. About 300 miles or so.

double-quotes-end.png

Some megas like Schneider offer local positions too, it's not just the local mom-and-pops. Some also offer dedicated routes. Not having to go all over the nation into unknown territory would seem more comforting to me. Sticking around southwestern states like Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Louisiana and Kansas doesn't seem to bad for regional. The weather is favorable most of the time. No serious mountain driving or severe winter driving usually. Being based in Texas and driving regional even would keep me out of the nastiest places in the Lower 48 to drive, Lalaland, CA and the Rust Belt. I gather regional usually doesn't extend beyond three state lines. There is still that nasty sleeper and those nasty choke-n-pukes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI9fq6XOkKM

Those mega local jobs usually go to drivers with seniority that want to come off OTR. I wouldn't be looking at "local mom-and-pops" but the big LTL's like YRC, XPO, Saia, and whatever else they got in Austin.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Breydan W.'s Comment
member avatar

You will more than likely need some OTR experience to land a local driving job. .

I was determined to land a local job when I returned to trucking after a 17 year hiatus and people told me just that - "you gotta have OTR experience to get one of those jobs." So I did some more research and found that none of the local companies I was interested (the big LTL's and food service companies) required OTR experience. Some will hire you with a CDL and graduate certificate from an approved school and some require 1 year of commercial driving experience (class A, tractor-trailer). No mention of over-the-road.

Of course, the lowest barrier route to getting that one year of experience is going OTR with one of the mega carriers, but that's not the only way, by any means.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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