In Need Of Some Blunt Honesty Concerning My Chances

Topic 29845 | Page 1

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Hiyuce W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey there, I am 21f and really itching to get my CDL. I worked for a delivery company, and had no accidents until one bad day. I didn’t look left again - dumb mistake - and clipped someone ahead of me. Airbags deployed for them but no injuries and no citation issued for myself. I already had most of the tuition cost saved up - what are my chances of even getting a job now? I’ve had a couple speeding tickets in the past for under 10 also, but never have been in an accident before.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Gabriel 's Comment
member avatar

You starting with Wilson?

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Davy has it pretty well covered. I'll just re-state the thing he said about company training vs private school.

A private CDL school will kindly take your money and train you too get your CDL. They will tell you the are many trucking jobs available for you (that's true), but the real bottom line is the private school can't guarantee you a paycheck after you are done with the course.

When you apply For Paid CDL Training and get accepted, your company does the background checks before you get the bus ticket. So if there's a monkey wrench in your hirability, you'll know before are committed to the school training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

You starting with Wilson?

double-quotes-start.png

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

double-quotes-end.png

Knight Transportation. They are a little bit different than most, youre actually hired before you start with them, so youre earning a paycheck the day you start school. But, you have to pay for your hotel, etc. It works out about the same as far as I can tell. There are a lot of factors to look at between one company and another in regards to training, costs, pay, length of time etc.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Gabriel 's Comment
member avatar

Yes definitely I am in the process of weighing my options myself was just curious. I just hadn't heard of it being done that way with anyone besides Wilson. I will check out Knight as well thanks. 😀

double-quotes-start.png

You starting with Wilson?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Knight Transportation. They are a little bit different than most, youre actually hired before you start with them, so youre earning a paycheck the day you start school. But, you have to pay for your hotel, etc. It works out about the same as far as I can tell. There are a lot of factors to look at between one company and another in regards to training, costs, pay, length of time etc.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Someone send up the bat signal for Ratpack . This person needs “blunt honesty” 🤣🤣

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Correction “Packrat” we don’t need Dean Martin and the gang just yet .Lol

Hiyuce W.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you very much! This is very informative and I appreciate it. Great job on landing with that company :) I’m proud of you dude

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you very much! This is very informative and I appreciate it. Great job on landing with that company :) I’m proud of you dude

double-quotes-start.png

Some of the folks that have been here a long time can tell you better. Im just fixing to start company paid school on Monday. I do have a ton of experience with speeding tickets however. As long as they are documented at under 10 mph, and you did not have a CDL nor a CLP at the time, many companies will still hire you, but it depends on their hiring policies. As far as the accident goes, I think a lot of that would depend on how it is handled and documented through the company you are/were working for.

It brings up a great point that was brought up to me and changed the direction I was going to go in. Old School and many others here have ample reasons why it would be more advantageous for you to pursue company paid/sponsored CDL training. I bring this up because you mentioned that you were saving up tuition. In doing so, you could find yourself finishing school, getting a nice fancy looking CDL and not having a job after spending all that hard earned money. CDL school only teaches you how to qualify for the bare minimum requirements to get a CDL. It doesnt teach you how to become a driver, nor do you get the needed experience. As it is, Most companies require experience and like to see you in at least 6 months of OTR before they will even touch you. I can attest to this, I have a stack of denials from companies that I tried to get on with when I was going to go the self paid route.

The company Im starting with on Monday, while not paying for my school per say, has some skin in the game. Im already hired and will be getting paid to attend their school, paid to train with them and am getting the schooling on a low cost zero interest loan thats deducted from my checks in small amounts. In addition, I get to train in the same tractors and trailers I will be driving for them.

Id highly recommend looking into the links here for Paid CDL training and resource materials available. Paid CDL Training Programs

Truck Driver's Career Guide

And Im not sure how to link on but the article of Why I prefer company paid CDL training to self paid CDL school. If someone can link to it.

double-quotes-end.png

I still have to prove myself through school and training, so as was told to me here, im considering it a rolling interview. Just going to do the best I can do and soak up as much information as I can. This site has a wealth of information and resources to help you make sound decisions in this industry.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

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