Rookie Adivse?

Topic 2985 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Michael Y.'s Comment
member avatar

I start my training on the 17th, I already have my CDL A permit (passed first try thanks to TruckingTruth's training course). My biggest fears is the Pre-trip inspection test, double clutching , down shifting and backing, emphasis on pre-trip, I'm afraid that I'll forget a ton while doing the test. I have driven vehicles with standard transmission, but double clutching is definitely foreign to me. When I was a kid my step dad let me drive his truck from a stop, but had me float the gears , which I did well with that (needed to watch the road more than the RPM gauge lol I was 13 then). Downshifting I didn't do much in my cars/trucks, so I will need practice there, and the biggest thing I backed once was a 40ft goose neck travel trailer trailer on a Dodge dually within the parking lot of the RV place I worked at. I was given a tip by one of the salesmen that worked there on backing on how to hold the wheel, and I found that much easier than the way I was originally holding it.

I don't foresee a major issue while going forward, other than up and down shifting. I will need to learn where to start turning while making a right hand turn. I drove a 26ft (no CDL required to drive) box truck for a delivery company so a I have a small concept of turning a larger vehicle.

I'm sure most of my fears I will get over while doing it daily. I guess my biggest question would be, any advise on how to learn and remember what to say for the pre-trip test?confused.gif

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Float The Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

When I was in school I made copies of the pre trip cheat sheet and carry it around in my pocket. I would go over it few times throughout my day. My girlfriend would test me on it and circle parts I was messing up on. Its all about practice and getting it in your head. Good luck!

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Michael, don't sweat it a bit. They're going to drill that pre-trip inspection into you like crazy. You'll have all the time in the world to learn that stuff. Use our pre-trip inspection study guide if you haven't already. That will help you get familiar with a lot of the parts, the terms that are used, and what you'll be checking for. Every school and each state have slightly different terminology and such so you'll learn the final specifics at school.

But don't sweat it. You'll learn it all easily enough.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I'll confess that the pretrip was one of my biggest fears going into the state test. But if the place you're going to is anything like my school you'll have a hard time forgetting anything on a pretrip. You do so much repetition that it becomes second nature. As far as shifting goes you just need the practice. It sounds like you already know when to shift it's just how. Grab a pillow to use for a pedal and a plunger (clean one preferably) as a shifter and practice the whole clutch neutral, clutch shift while sitting in a chair. You use the pillow to give you some resistance on your foot and to get you used to only depressing the pedal and inch or two. If your a visual guy you tube has plenty of good shifting videos. Hope this helps and good luck!

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Hey, check out my thread in the daries section on this forum. The title is Rhoel driver training from start to finish. I just finished my first week of school. Many of the fears you state, I had the same ones as you. The double clutching is tricky but after a couple of days it gets easier. I still miss gears and grind some but for the most part I hit the gears. The pre trip is a lot to learn but we cover it at least twice a day. After a week, I feel it will be no problem. You will do fine.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Reports From CDL Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More