1994 Freightliner FL-70 Air Governor Cut Off And Parking Brake PSI Questions

Topic 30033 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Bob M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello,

Bit of a long shot here but I'm going to be taking my CDL skills test soon and am running into an issue of my truck not meeting the standards for the test. . Not sure if this only applies to Washington state but according to my state provided CDL study guide the compression check requires that my air governor cut off in the range of 120-140 PSI and for the air test that my parking brake re-engage at approximately 40 PSI. Both have the added note "Or to truck's specifications"

I currently only have access to a 1994 FL-70 for the test but the governor cuts off in the range of 100-110 PSI and I about have to empty the air tank before the parking brake re-engages. I've discussed this with the CDL office and they said they'll only let me test in the truck if it meets their standards or I can prove the truck's specifications list the lower ranges. So my questions would be, first can anyone confirm these ranges for a 1994 FL-70? Second would the owner's manual have this information, and if so where could I acquire a manual? and lastly if I need to get to the DOL's standards is this easily done or would I be looking at costly repairs?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Bob, and welcome to our forum!

First, your post raises a lot of questions. Maybe you don't care to answer them, but I will ask a few anyways.

1) What exactly are you planning on doing with your CDL?

2) Are you not bothering with going to a CDL school?

3) If not, what is your reasoning?

4) It sounds as if you already have your own truck. Are you trying to jump right into the deep water before you even know how to swim?

5) You seem very concerned about the high costs of repairs to your truck. Have you considered what insurance is going to cost you as an inexperienced driver?

according to my state provided CDL study guide the compression check requires that my air governor cut off in the range of 120-140 PSI and for the air test that my parking brake re-engage at approximately 40 PSI.

Okay, now let's talk about those requirements for the truck. The numbers in your CDL manual are standard across the country. The Freightliner FL-70, although a smaller truck than most of us drive, is still subject to those same standards. Since there are no special specifications particular to that truck, you will not find anything in the manual to help you prove anything. It looks like you need to have the air compression system checked out and brought up to legal specifications. I can't really give you an idea of the cost since I can't diagnose the problem from my couch.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bob M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the fast response! So to answer some of your questions.

I'm a public works employee. My job requires that I have at least a class b endorsement however its mainly so I can drive our plow/sander truck (the FL-70) for the approximate 3 days a year it snows around here, otherwise the biggest thing I drive is a F-550. As for school the short answer is yes I did attend school. The longer answer, which I may detail further after I acquire my CDL , is basically a sad cautionary tale of why you do not go with the cheapest option CDL school. To say the least they've left me in a bind in both training and the vehicle I can test in. Because of this my city is generously letting me continue the training in their truck and giving me some much needed review of vehicle inspection and drive time. I realize I could rent a truck but ideally I'd like to test in the vehicle I'm familiar with.

Since the vehicle is owned by the city the issue isn't so much the cost of getting the truck up to spec but the headache of getting the approvals etc. The vehicle has passed it's yearly state inspection but I'm guessing the standards there may not be as strict as the CDL office? Or perhaps something changed with the vehicle in the past few months. Either way you've provided me the bit of information I can pass along to them and see what they come back with.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Good luck Bob. I hope you can get everything worked out satisfactorily.

Bob M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, appreciate the help.

Chris L's Comment
member avatar

Bob I'm not sure how it goes in Washington state but as long as you test in any commercial truck that requires a Class "B" License you should be good. In New York if you plan to drive a school or passenger bus you must test on those specific vehicles otherwise any commercial vehicle should be fine to test on. When I drove School bus some of my fellow drivers would drive dump trucks during the summer break they didn't have to go through another "Road test" to operate a dump truck. Is it possible that another department in your village / town might have a vehicle that you could use for your road / skills test. Maybe reach out to a neighboring town/ village that could loan your department a vehicle for your test. Never hurts to have your supervisor reach out only thing you risk is getting a No. Keep us posted on your progress and good luck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bob M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello again,

Wanted to give an update. I've successfully obtained my CDL. We ended up using a newer Peterbilt for the test that met the standards of the CDL office. After a lot of back and forth with their office we could never get a straight answer about how much they adhere to those PSI standards. First they wouldn't budge on it, then it was okay because the truck had already passed it's yearly inspection... and then it wasn't okay again. It seemed to depend on whoever we were speaking to. To save us the headache the director of our department let me use their newest truck and everything went smoothly.

I'd like to say thank you for the help. Having no background in trucking, ending up in a discount school that did not prepare me nearly enough, and having to retrain myself has certainly given me a new respect for truckers and the skill level needed to be one. Additionally everyone I've reached out to for help, including these forums, have been exceptionally helpful and patient.

I will add in case any other newcomers see this, PAY for a good school. The CDL exam is no joke and the examiners expect you to know that vehicle inside an out. If the school gives you a cheat sheet for your exam make sure to compare it to the most current state provided CDL guide. They're free and they tell you exactly what the examiner will be looking for. Its a big red flag if your school omits any of the state's requirements or in my case tells you to ignore critical components of the exam.

Relived this is done. I have some new found confidence after going through it successfully. I won't name my terrible school other than if you are in the greater Seattle area and thinking about getting a CDL... Once again DO NOT go with the cheapest option in town.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations on getting your CDL.

We continue to not recommend paying for schools, opting instead for company sponsored training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More