Oldest New Driver Ever Or Bust With No Work Record?

Topic 30307 | Page 1

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Rob's Comment
member avatar

So after 10 years of retirement watching my river flow by I’ve decided at the age of 70 to get out there. Crazy? Maybe, but my health is exceptional, I still wrestle 3 point tractor attachments. But as I started research into this I got a little dizzy. CDL school? Company that trains you as long as you sign a long term contract? Old fart free schools? Then on one call I made I was told I needed a recent work history. Is this industry wide? I don’t have a record of how many fish I’ve cleaned over the last 10 years but I could make one up😬 Suggestions?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Welcome aboard Rob!

as I started research into this I got a little dizzy. CDL school? Company that trains you as long as you sign a long term contract? Old fart free schools? Then on one call I made I was told I needed a recent work history. Is this industry wide?

First off let's talk about your age. 70 is not too old. We had a member in here who started his trucking career at 75. I started at 53. The day I got hired at my first trucking job there was another man there getting hired at 73! Yes, it is more than doable.

Now, let's talk about the stuff that is making your head spin.

There are all kinds of ways to get your CDL. There is one other thing you need if you plan on using that CDL to get a job. You will need a training certificate indicating 160 hours of training. This document is required by the FMCSA (Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration) to be on file at any trucking company hiring rookie drivers. To get that training certificate you will have to attend a truck driving school. I went to a private truck driving school. I paid my own tuition because I thought I would get the best training that way and have my free reign of where I wanted to work. I was wrong on both accounts.

I now promote the Paid CDL Training Programs. They require a commitment from you to work for the company after they train you. It is not a long term commitment. One year is a very short time. You will barely be getting your feet wet in this career in that period of time. It gives them a chance to help you develop into a professional that contributes to their team, and it helps you to gain a little understanding of what it takes to make it out here in this career.

Imagine someone surprising you with a gift of making an investment in YOU. That’s exactly what happens in these company sponsored training programs. They take a look at you before they ever commit to putting you through their program. Most of them are fairly picky about who they select. They want to see safe driving records, and steady employment records. They want to make sure you are a responsible adult who takes care of their business. If they like what they see, they will offer to pay your way through their training program. They make an investment in you, hoping that you will prove to be a productive member of their team. They need help and are willing to pay to get you to the point where you can contribute meaningfully. Oftentimes they will even pay you a decent wage while you are training.

Have you heard the phrase “having skin in the game?” That’s what these trucking companies do. They put some skin in the game for your benefit. They don’t want to train you and then let you go. They don’t do this so they can collect the money you owe them. They are not in the loan business. They are in the trucking business. They need drivers, and they are willing to pay to get them set up for success.

Let’s assume you are struggling with some aspect of your training. They have every reason to spend a little more time on you to polish you off. They don’t want to lose what they have put into you. There is no question these programs are done in a rush. They need to get you out of the classroom and into a truck as quickly as possible. They are not going to waste too much time or money on a bad investment. If you are proving to make progress and seem committed to the effort, they will work with you and help you get to where you need to be.

A three year work history is industry wide and mandatory. Once again this comes down from the FMCSA. This is a post 9/11 regulation to make sure terrorists aren't attempting to do something crazy with our trucks like they did with our planes. For a person like yourself, you just need to prove that you have been retired for the last ten years. You could possibly do that with income tax records, and Social Security records. You can also have some friends (not family) provide some notarized letters indicating they know you have been retired and playing around at your house for the last three years. Anything like that can help you establish where you have been and what you have been doing for the last three years. That is what they really need to know. Work history helps them confirm where you've been and what you've been doing. That is what they need to establish.

Please, hang around with us and bring us all your questions. We can and will help you get this thing rolling. You are going to have more questions. We are happy to share our experience and direct you in the best way to get this new career underway.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rob's Comment
member avatar

Old School that swept away some cob webs and is much appreciated! Thank you for taking the time to detail out those thoughts. It makes total sense. I'm in, I'll be selecting a company next month after some research. I realize promoting one company over another depends on some variables like drivers needs, family, etc. But I am flying solo and love the long road. Suggestions?

Welcome aboard Rob!

double-quotes-start.png

as I started research into this I got a little dizzy. CDL school? Company that trains you as long as you sign a long term contract? Old fart free schools? Then on one call I made I was told I needed a recent work history. Is this industry wide?

double-quotes-end.png

First off let's talk about your age. 70 is not too old. We had a member in here who started his trucking career at 75. I started at 53. The day I got hired at my first trucking job there was another man there getting hired at 73! Yes, it is more than doable.

Now, let's talk about the stuff that is making your head spin.

There are all kinds of ways to get your CDL. There is one other thing you need if you plan on using that CDL to get a job. You will need a training certificate indicating 160 hours of training. This document is required by the FMCSA (Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration) to be on file at any trucking company hiring rookie drivers. To get that training certificate you will have to attend a truck driving school. I went to a private truck driving school. I paid my own tuition because I thought I would get the best training that way and have my free reign of where I wanted to work. I was wrong on both accounts.

I now promote the Paid CDL Training Programs. They require a commitment from you to work for the company after they train you. It is not a long term commitment. One year is a very short time. You will barely be getting your feet wet in this career in that period of time. It gives them a chance to help you develop into a professional that contributes to their team, and it helps you to gain a little understanding of what it takes to make it out here in this career.

Imagine someone surprising you with a gift of making an investment in YOU. That’s exactly what happens in these company sponsored training programs. They take a look at you before they ever commit to putting you through their program. Most of them are fairly picky about who they select. They want to see safe driving records, and steady employment records. They want to make sure you are a responsible adult who takes care of their business. If they like what they see, they will offer to pay your way through their training program. They make an investment in you, hoping that you will prove to be a productive member of their team. They need help and are willing to pay to get you to the point where you can contribute meaningfully. Oftentimes they will even pay you a decent wage while you are training.

Have you heard the phrase “having skin in the game?” That’s what these trucking companies do. They put some skin in the game for your benefit. They don’t want to train you and then let you go. They don’t do this so they can collect the money you owe them. They are not in the loan business. They are in the trucking business. They need drivers, and they are willing to pay to get them set up for success.

Let’s assume you are struggling with some aspect of your training. They have every reason to spend a little more time on you to polish you off. They don’t want to lose what they have put into you. There is no question these programs are done in a rush. They need to get you out of the classroom and into a truck as quickly as possible. They are not going to waste too much time or money on a bad investment. If you are proving to make progress and seem committed to the effort, they will work with you and help you get to where you need to be.

A three year work history is industry wide and mandatory. Once again this comes down from the FMCSA. This is a post 9/11 regulation to make sure terrorists aren't attempting to do something crazy with our trucks like they did with our planes. For a person like yourself, you just need to prove that you have been retired for the last ten years. You could possibly do that with income tax records, and Social Security records. You can also have some friends (not family) provide some notarized letters indicating they know you have been retired and playing around at your house for the last three years. Anything like that can help you establish where you have been and what you have been doing for the last three years. That is what they really need to know. Work history helps them confirm where you've been and what you've been doing. That is what they need to establish.

Please, hang around with us and bring us all your questions. We can and will help you get this thing rolling. You are going to have more questions. We are happy to share our experience and direct you in the best way to get this new career underway.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Old School that swept away some cob webs and is much appreciated! Thank you for taking the time to detail out those thoughts. It makes total sense. I'm in, I'll be selecting a company next month after some research. I realize promoting one company over another depends on some variables like drivers needs, family, etc. But I am flying solo and love the long road. Suggestions?

Here is our Training Materials:

TT Training Materials

This is our One and Done Handy Dandy Job Form

TT Jobs Form

The companies are all good but they don't have to take you and some won't, so don't restrict yourself to just one company. Talk with all of them to see who might be the best fit.

Laura

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Laura! Filling out the one and done form on TT IS the plan. I’m sure all companies have good and bad points. My job is get into the one that accepts my app and suits me best. Appreciate the input. I can’t tell you how excited I am over this whole new life change. What a great forum this is!

double-quotes-start.png

Old School that swept away some cob webs and is much appreciated! Thank you for taking the time to detail out those thoughts. It makes total sense. I'm in, I'll be selecting a company next month after some research. I realize promoting one company over another depends on some variables like drivers needs, family, etc. But I am flying solo and love the long road. Suggestions?

double-quotes-end.png

Here is our Training Materials:

TT Training Materials

This is our One and Done Handy Dandy Job Form

TT Jobs Form

The companies are all good but they don't have to take you and some won't, so don't restrict yourself to just one company. Talk with all of them to see who might be the best fit.

Laura

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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