I Am Interested In Being A Truck Driver In The Future But…

Topic 30387 | Page 1

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Cassandra W.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a history of mental illness (ADHD, Anxiety, Autism, Depression) and suicide attempts (has been 6-7 tears since the last one and they were never anything that could hurt others in the process). I have never had any hallucinations other than maybe the ones you get when you just wake up. I am on some medications which I can provide the names of if needed. I also didn’t get my Driver’s license until recently (I am 25) due to a previous phobia of driving I have managed to get over after due to some hard work.

I don’t do drugs and have never been drunk. I will readily admit I had problems but Im leagues better than I have ever been and want to know if it’s at all possible for me to become a driver in the future? My mother says it’s impossible and I should just give up but I want the opinions of those actually in the industry before I do.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I would pursue different career path. Trucking can take a lot out of you mentally.

Plus, I'm not sure if you would get approved for a DOT card with a medical history like that and depending on the medication you maybe disqualified anyway.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Hey Cassandra,

I pretty much have to second Bobcat's opinion, this is probably not the best career choice for you. Trucking is a very mentally intensive industry. For example, how are you when you are tired? A typical day can go from 9 to 14 hours, how would you handle things when you reach your physical and mental limit? Are you irritable? Crabby? How does that affect your judgement? Pardon my asking, but what if our have a relapse or an episode on the road? Behind the wheel of an 80,000 pound machine is not the place for that, not only is it your life, but the lives of others around you.

Can you wake up on time? Some meds make people very drowsy or nauseated which is why many companies and the FMSCA (which is the Federal Government entity that regulates commerical vehicle traffic) have a list of medications and conditions that automatically disqualify a person from driving a truck in the first place. Even if your medication list weren't prohibited how do you do in environments with constantly changing and erratic variables and schedules? For example I run reefer trailers and dry vans (reefer is refrigerated food stuff and dry vans are the big box trailers you commonly). Delivery and appointment times vary dorm day to day, one day at 8 or 10 am 2 days later at 130 AM then maybe at 230pm the next day or so, see what I mean?

Having had family members and friends who struggle with mental illness i do know that structure and stable routine are HUGE, to be blunt you won't get that driving truck, you just won't. I'd seriously look at other avenues if your mental health is that much of a struggle for you and ibsay that looking out for YOU first.

You might consider a local delivery (non CDL) van gig, those at least have more stable hours and consistency. Please don't take this as us pooing all over your dreams and desires,but honey you have to be realistic as well too, the health (physically and mentally) of the driver is in my opinion the key component of the Truck.

Hope that helps and best of luck to you.

Moe

I have a history of mental illness (ADHD, Anxiety, Autism, Depression) and suicide attempts (has been 6-7 tears since the last one and they were never anything that could hurt others in the process). I have never had any hallucinations other than maybe the ones you get when you just wake up. I am on some medications which I can provide the names of if needed. I also didn’t get my Driver’s license until recently (I am 25) due to a previous phobia of driving I have managed to get over after due to some hard work.

I don’t do drugs and have never been drunk. I will readily admit I had problems but Im leagues better than I have ever been and want to know if it’s at all possible for me to become a driver in the future? My mother says it’s impossible and I should just give up but I want the opinions of those actually in the industry before I do.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Personally I think the stress of trucking could jeopardize the progress you have made. Even if all went right and your were approved.... Your mental health is at risk and trucking isnt worth that.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

👍👊

Personally I think the stress of trucking could jeopardize the progress you have made. Even if all went right and your were approved.... Your mental health is at risk and trucking isnt worth that.

Paul V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, it'd be better to reconsider that choice; with that psychological history, the mental strain put on truckers could endanger your progress, yourself, and everyone around you. It's, unfortunately, a psychologically demanding job.

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

I had depression and anxiety, which I was taking medications for, and SWIFT was willing to hire me. I didn't want to work for them, however.

My anxiety was a problem during training. I always felt overwhelmed. I ended up getting thrown around while other students were driving the truck, which left me with a stiff neck that I could hardly even turn. Anyway, I never became a truck driver, so I don't know if someone with our mental issues can manage it or not. I got good reviews from my instructors, but I felt I needed more training, and the trucking school I went to lied about me getting more training. The DMV agreed with me that I needed more training. It's a long story. In the end, it was my attitude/personality that got in the way.

Anyway, Cassandra, you want to make sure your prescriptions aren't on this list: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5&node=21:9.0.1.1.9#se21.9.1308_111

None of mine are on the list. However, you can find truck drivers saying they are on various forums. They don't seem to know what they're talking about. Also, I found a drug that works great for my anxiety: Buspar. You might want to try it if you decide to go ahead with becoming a truck driver. Good luck!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Anyway, Cassandra, you want to make sure your prescriptions aren't on this list: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5&node=21:9.0.1.1.9#se21.9.1308_111

None of mine are on the list. However, you can find truck drivers saying they are on various forums. They don't seem to know what they're talking about. Also, I found a drug that works great for my anxiety: Buspar. You might want to try it if you decide to go ahead with becoming a truck driver. Good luck!

Just because a med is DOT acceptable does not mean a company will accept it. Companies can put stiffer stipulations. Example... Trazadone is an antianxiety medication that is non addictive. Prime does not accept this, but I know other companies that will.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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