Roehl's Lease Operator Program - What Percentage Does The O/O Pay For Fuel?, Fuel Tax? IFTA?

Topic 30434 | Page 2

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Reuben M.'s Comment
member avatar

Greg M.

If I made $68K - $89K, as you did, I probably would not consider the L/O.

End plan is to explore the Trucking Industry, and learn how to earn at a high level. I have a very open mind, and am appreciative of all the sound advice. I realize that this is not a job for everyone.

I really won't know what it all about until I get my hind parts in that seat and start turning wheels. I am, however, optimistic as I move forward.

Lastly, I will strongly consider your post. Seems to be very sound advice, and Thank You!

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the insight, but I think that you missed the part about me leasing from Roehl as a lease operator within their company infrastructure. The most of the problems that you noted would not apply.

No, I didn't miss the part about going LO. You missed my intent which is Lease Operator is NOT the way to go, but to learn the trade, save up your money and go OO. I generally make as much as an LO....so I'm running lots of miles (and I'm 70 at the end of this month) without all the hassle of paperwork, repairs, etc.

Laura

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Reuben, if you set your mind to it and follow the advice on here, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to make that 70- mid 80 range as a company driver. Going lease after only a year experience won’t put you at a higher wage than a solid company driver. There are so many companies out here now paying $.60, $.65 and $.70 cpm to solo drivers it isn’t even funny. A little quick math will show you how easy it is to make a solid living in a short amount of time. Plus, you mention learning rates etc. As a company driver, you’re not going to learn what the company actually makes on a load, at least not right away and until you get to know the right people.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reuben M.'s Comment
member avatar

Reuben, if you set your mind to it and follow the advice on here, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to make that 70- mid 80 range as a company driver. Going lease after only a year experience won’t put you at a higher wage than a solid company driver. There are so many companies out here now paying $.60, $.65 and $.70 cpm to solo drivers it isn’t even funny. A little quick math will show you how easy it is to make a solid living in a short amount of time. Plus, you mention learning rates etc. As a company driver, you’re not going to learn what the company actually makes on a load, at least not right away and until you get to know the right people.

Thanks for the input Rob. If I can make $75-80K on 120,000 Miles, remaining a Company Driver would be an easy decision.

I have seen Walmart hiring at $85K, however, that was with 3 years of experience. I have seen Tanker jobs, but they wanted 2 years of experience. Although, I respect the trade, I have no desire for Flatbed where they make anywhere from 5 to 15 cents more per mile.

My focus is Van OTR with an average of 2,500 miles per week. I'm sure that if I keep my record clean I can get up to mid $70's in about 3 years within that criteria. I can see myself in Tankers. I'm sure I can get to $80's with that kind of haul with the same miles.

Thanks again for the wisdom in your post.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

You're selling yourself short with those numbers. As a company driver for Crete, I see no reason I won't see a minimum of $70K NET for 2021. First half of the year I was OTR , and been on a WM dedicated account from Cheyenne for the past 10 days.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Reuben M.'s Comment
member avatar

You're selling yourself short with those numbers. As a company driver for Crete, I see no reason I won't see a minimum of $70K NET for 2021. First half of the year I was OTR , and been on a WM dedicated account from Cheyenne for the past 10 days.

Pack Rat

Thanks for the advice. After I get a year of experience I will re-evaluate companies.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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