Opinion On Truck Options

Topic 30578 | Page 1

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Gabe M.'s Comment
member avatar

Late night greetings one and all. Hope the road is treating you right tonight, or that you're re-charging the batteries in a way that makes you happy. I read a good portion of Brett's book the other night. A pretty darned good read thus far. I think, by way of getting into the nomadic trucking spirit, I may order up one or both of Mr. Wickenhauser's Trucking Fiction books. Tomorrow I'll start hitting the Driver's Manual hard in order to get ready for the "A" permit that I'll need. If info. overload is not kicking me in the proverbial fourth point of contact (Parachute Landing Falls, Pack Rat) then maybe I'll get motivated and try for an endorsement.

I just saw an Las Vegas Raider themed heavy hauler based out of Chicago on Social Media...What can I say, but Dayummmm! Don't know that this late in the game, starting my new career, I'll be able to cruise a truck like that, but Wow! I'm content just looking. I also really like some of the Cabovers that have been posted on another thread on this site.

I've never driven anything bigger than a 2.5 ton military truck or a 24 pax box van. Looking at the Company site for whom I'll be training and driving for, I see they have the 2018/2019 Freightliner Cascadia and Peterbilt 579. I'll be happy to skillfully drive any eighteen wheeler, but just curious if anybody on here has experience driving either of those two trucks, and accompanying insights, opinions, knowledge, etc. Also, it looks like one or both of the trucks is an automated manual 12 speed. What would that mean to me in laymen's terms? Thanks a bunch.

Gabe

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Also, it looks like one or both of the trucks is an automated manual 12 speed. What would that mean to me in laymen's terms?

As a rookie driver you will be driving a fairly modern truck. It will not be an eye catcher or a classic long nosed Pete. It is going to be a run of the mill standard issue tractor that gets the job done. Here's one I've been driving.

0564492001627913810.jpg

It's nice, but it isn't a classic rig that grabs your attention. You are out here to get a job done, and you will be issued equipment that fills that need. People have their preferences, but basically these trucks are pretty much the same as far as being able to get the job done. That transmission you mention is an automatic. That is what almost all of us are driving now days. They are standard gear boxes just like the old manual shift transmissions. The difference is the trucks computer system does the shifting for you. They are extremely reliable and very dependable. You won't be jamming gears, but you will be able to control your truck in all sorts of driving conditions. Once you learn how the jake break and the cruise control is incorporated into the computer controls of the transmission, you will be able to get it to handle just the way you need it to when driving in the mountains or other challenging areas.

They will assign you whatever truck is available when you are ready to go solo. Don't count on getting to pick and choose which truck you will be driving.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

As pretty as some of the trucks are, most of the newer ones are easier to park. Also, some companies have their trucks spec’d out a little different. So a Freightliner with one company may pull mountains better than the same model for a company that usually only hauls in the flatlands.

Drive yours safe and efficient while enjoying the view.

Gabe M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the detailed answer Old School. I appreciate it. I ask out of curiosity. I don't have any B.J. and the Bear or Smokey and the Bandit fantasies. ( ; Nor do I harbor any aspirations of being able to pick my "own ride" I was wondering if there was any preferences between the two offered trucks, Peterbilt 579 and Freightliner Cascadia. Above and beyond basic curiosity (not too important anyway because I'm about to learn vis a vis the school of hard knocks) Just an Old Soldier looking for a fairly recession proof and at least sometimes interesting way to make a living. Being advised of new, strange, and inconsistent guidance and protocols with regard to Covid, is something which doesn't figure in to my career plan, so hoping to leave it in the rear view mirror so to speak. I like "extremely reliable and very dependable." Also, thanks for the mention of the Jake Brake and Cruise Control figuring into the transmission controls.

V/r Gabe

double-quotes-start.png

Also, it looks like one or both of the trucks is an automated manual 12 speed. What would that mean to me in laymen's terms?

double-quotes-end.png

As a rookie driver you will be driving a fairly modern truck. It will not be an eye catcher or a classic long nosed Pete. It is going to be a run of the mill standard issue tractor that gets the job done. Here's one I've been driving.

0564492001627913810.jpg

It's nice, but it isn't a classic rig that grabs your attention. You are out here to get a job done, and you will be issued equipment that fills that need. People have their preferences, but basically these trucks are pretty much the same as far as being able to get the job done. That transmission you mention is an automatic. That is what almost all of us are driving now days. They are standard gear boxes just like the old manual shift transmissions. The difference is the trucks computer system does the shifting for you. They are extremely reliable and very dependable. You won't be jamming gears, but you will be able to control your truck in all sorts of driving conditions. Once you learn how the jake break and the cruise control is incorporated into the computer controls of the transmission, you will be able to get it to handle just the way you need it to when driving in the mountains or other challenging areas.

They will assign you whatever truck is available when you are ready to go solo. Don't count on getting to pick and choose which truck you will be driving.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Gabe M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks very much Steve. I appreciate the input. I'm always a fan of easy, and easier to park sounds like it might make the top of the "easier" list. You make an interesting point about companies spec'ing vehicles out differently. I never would have even considered that. There is so much collective/combined knowledge on this site, the information pool regarding most any question seems to run the gamut of human experience. Yessir, At this point in my life (fifty plus) I just hope to become an asset versus a liability in my new chosen profession. I look forward about learning different ways and means toward becoming more efficient and productive over time. Hence, I'll try heeding the advice that yourself and Old School kindly took the time to offer up.

V/r Gabe

As pretty as some of the trucks are, most of the newer ones are easier to park. Also, some companies have their trucks spec’d out a little different. So a Freightliner with one company may pull mountains better than the same model for a company that usually only hauls in the flatlands.

Drive yours safe and efficient while enjoying the view.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gabe M.'s Comment
member avatar

I forgot to thank you for the pic Old School. Much appreciated! I see the Wilson Log. trucks heading up and down the I-5. Heck, I think they look pretty cool, truth be told. But, the biggest factor other than geography playing a part in my decision, is simply that the Company got in touch with me ASAP, and that they have a friendly "pet rider" policy. V/r Gabe

double-quotes-start.png

Also, it looks like one or both of the trucks is an automated manual 12 speed. What would that mean to me in laymen's terms?

double-quotes-end.png

As a rookie driver you will be driving a fairly modern truck. It will not be an eye catcher or a classic long nosed Pete. It is going to be a run of the mill standard issue tractor that gets the job done. Here's one I've been driving.

0564492001627913810.jpg

It's nice, but it isn't a classic rig that grabs your attention. You are out here to get a job done, and you will be issued equipment that fills that need. People have their preferences, but basically these trucks are pretty much the same as far as being able to get the job done. That transmission you mention is an automatic. That is what almost all of us are driving now days. They are standard gear boxes just like the old manual shift transmissions. The difference is the trucks computer system does the shifting for you. They are extremely reliable and very dependable. You won't be jamming gears, but you will be able to control your truck in all sorts of driving conditions. Once you learn how the jake break and the cruise control is incorporated into the computer controls of the transmission, you will be able to get it to handle just the way you need it to when driving in the mountains or other challenging areas.

They will assign you whatever truck is available when you are ready to go solo. Don't count on getting to pick and choose which truck you will be driving.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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