Failed My Physical Agility With Roehl 😩

Topic 30605 | Page 1

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Latifah E.'s Comment
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I’m kinda bummed about the whole situation. Smh I passed thru everything and even got my hair cut off for the follicle test… just to fail the last part of the physical agility test. Not being able to climb into the back of the trailer stopped me from being great LOl. I honestly don’t see the point if majority of the loads will be no touch or drop and hook. I mean They wouldn’t even let me use a lil step ladder smh. Do any of you ladies know another company I can try out that won’t require the ability to climb into the back of the trailer ? Ik prime doesn’t require an agility test for reefer/dry van but I had a bad experience with a trainer at Prime and don’t want to go back. I have little to no experience so I’d like to stick to starter companies that provide training OTR. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 😩😊

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I’m kinda bummed about the whole situation. Smh I passed thru everything and even got my hair cut off for the follicle test… just to fail the last part of the physical agility test. Not being able to climb into the back of the trailer stopped me from being great LOl. I honestly don’t see the point if majority of the loads will be no touch or drop and hook. I mean They wouldn’t even let me use a lil step ladder smh. Do any of you ladies know another company I can try out that won’t require the ability to climb into the back of the trailer ? Ik prime doesn’t require an agility test for reefer/dry van but I had a bad experience with a trainer at Prime and don’t want to go back. I have little to no experience so I’d like to stick to starter companies that provide training OTR. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. 😩😊

I would check into CFI, if I were you. Be truthful, however.

Best of luck!

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

I would try again. I can't climb into a trailer without assistance, because of two ankle surgeries. What I do, is leave the left rear door closed, and it changes the angle that I can grip, and up I go on the ICC bumper.

I have also figured out that a yoga stretching strap looped around a hinge on the fully opened door can bring that grab point to the correct height for me. Don't give up!

Shirley B.'s Comment
member avatar

Latifah,

The point is you will need to be able to climb in and out of the trailer no matter who you work for. *** No touch, drop and hook freight is not gauranteed especially being a company driver... loads are forced dispatched one way or another. You can't rely on a step ladder all the time due to unlevel/soft ground in most shippers' and receivers' property configurations. The trucking company's insurance most likely will deny paying medical expenses if you get hurt on a ladder outside of the trailer or truck. Getting in and out of the tractor and trailer is a form of excercise activity to condition your body to meet the demands of the trucking occupation. Plus, in case of an emergency you need to be agile enough to move out of the way of things coming at you.

Example: Offloading away from the dock...A row of Walmart shopping carts- the wheels were not locked in by the shipper. I was told by receiver to break the seal and open the door. I opened the right side trailer door and rows of carts were being held back from falling out by the left side trailer door. I had to climb in the trailer quickly to prevent them from rolling out onto the ground and hitting a couple of Walmart bystanders. Thankfully I was on almost level ground giving me enough time to lock in the wheels and get help.

Since it's an agility test...I agree with Nae Nae In NC:

** Try Again as much as you are allowed to retest. Do push up exercises to gain upper body strength.

Possible steps to analyze and pass the agility test. *** Safety disclaimer: Do Not attempt the steps below without further advice and approval from the safety compliance examiner. The examiner will most likely give you instructions on how he/she would like you to climb safely into the trailer. If not... find another place to work.

Keeping atleast a 3 point contact and staying safe:

(1) Wear a hard hat at all times outside of your truck and trailer even if others don't require or don't adhere to their own safety. *** It's your head and mind- PROTECT IT. (2) Wear well fitting work gloves to prevent cuts and injuring your hands (3) Wear long sleeves to protect your arms and body. (4) Keep the left side door closed, locked and grip the edge with two hands to pull your body onto the ICC bar. (5) Keep the body tight against the trailer's edge still holding onto the left trailer door and standing securely on the ICC bar. (6) Place and Secure the back of your left elbow, arm and shoulder up against the inside of the door while both palms are secured on the floor of the trailer as if preparing for a push up. For security be mindful of grabbing the closed trailer door at all times to prevent any falling. (7) Gather your strength..Keeping your left elbow,arm, and shoulder anchored to the inside of the trailer door (a) when secure and ready. (b) plan on slightly pushing up and forward into the trailer to plant your upper body on the floor and bringing the right leg up into the trailer in one complete motion. Keep using the trailer door for balancing and security until you are completely inside the trailer.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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