1st Company And Would Like To Haul Reefer...

Topic 30933 | Page 1

Page 1 of 6 Next Page Go To Page:
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, so I am looking at choosing my first company, and I believe reefer will be my choice as far as what to haul. The following are the companies that I am considering, so I would appreciate any insight that can be offered to help me in the decision-making process:

Bulkley Trucking Butler Transport CFI Hogan JBS Carriers KLLM Kold Trans May Trucking National Carriers "the Elite Fleet" Navajo Express Pride Transport Sweet Express Tyson Foods

I know that some of these carriers haul more than just reefer, or more specifically, some don't have a division just for reefer.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

The decision process starts with sending applications. There are going to be some companies in that list that may reject you. I started my career with my list of preferred companies. None of them would even give me a shot. So I suggest you get serious about applications and then you can settle on a few that are willing to take you on.

I am curious though...

How did you throw Kold Trans into the mix? Was there something appealing to you with them? I am just trying to figure it out. Forgive my curiosity.

I can't really advise you on particulars about specific companies. I can tell you that your success will have nothing to do with the name on the doors of your truck. You will determine whether you are able to make this career work or not. You already quit once. So you know how frustration comes with the territory. The company you go with cannot eliminate the problems associated with trucking. Those issues are up to the driver to overcome.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

The decision process starts with sending applications. There are going to be some companies in that list that may reject you. I started my career with my list of preferred companies. None of them would even give me a shot. So I suggest you get serious about applications and then you can settle on a few that are willing to take you on.

I am curious though...

How did you throw Kold Trans into the mix? Was there something appealing to you with them? I am just trying to figure it out. Forgive my curiosity.

I can't really advise you on particulars about specific companies. I can tell you that your success will have nothing to do with the name on the doors of your truck. You will determine whether you are able to make this career work or not. You already quit once. So you know how frustration comes with the territory. The company you go with cannot eliminate the problems associated with trucking. Those issues are up to the driver to overcome.

Applications already filled out. None of them have eliminated me...yet. After speaking with them on the phone (will happen middle of next month once I return to the US) that will be a point where either the company or I decide the other just isn't a good fit. Because of the uphill battle that I have created for myself, I am not really in a position to outright rule out any specific company, so this is the reason Kold Trans is on that list. The fact that Kold Trans exclusively hauls reefer is a bit appealing. I have several on there that haul refrigerated among other types of loads because they are companies in which I genuinely have an interest. Thank you for the feedback.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Kerry, forgive me if I seem to ask questions rather than offer suggestions. It is a habit of mine to ask questions because I like for people to think about the choices and decisions they make when pursuing the trucking career. Sometimes a discussion about choices will bring out some interesting conversations that are helpful.

Could you explain to us why you prefer refrigerated freight? It might help some other newbies when they see your reasoning behind your choices.

Also, part of the reason I was curious about Kold Trans is because it is part of the Knight/Swift group of companies. I just thought it was odd that you had singled them out over the other companies in that group. But it makes sense if you just want to concentrate on reefer loads.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

David S.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, so I am looking at choosing my first company, and I believe reefer will be my choice as far as what to haul. The following are the companies that I am considering, so I would appreciate any insight that can be offered to help me in the decision-making process:

Bulkley Trucking Butler Transport CFI Hogan JBS Carriers KLLM Kold Trans May Trucking National Carriers "the Elite Fleet" Navajo Express Pride Transport Sweet Express Tyson Foods

I know that some of these carriers haul more than just reefer, or more specifically, some don't have a division just for reefer.

Just watch your reefer light AND MAKE SURE TO TURN THE THING BACK ON IF YOU TURN IT OFF. Had someone I worked with before that didn't turn theirs back on and when they got to their next stop the product was 60+ degrees and rejected. Driver fired immediately.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Ok, so I am looking at choosing my first company, and I believe reefer will be my choice as far as what to haul. The following are the companies that I am considering, so I would appreciate any insight that can be offered to help me in the decision-making process:

Bulkley Trucking Butler Transport CFI Hogan JBS Carriers KLLM Kold Trans May Trucking National Carriers "the Elite Fleet" Navajo Express Pride Transport Sweet Express Tyson Foods

I know that some of these carriers haul more than just reefer, or more specifically, some don't have a division just for reefer.

double-quotes-end.png

Just watch your reefer light AND MAKE SURE TO TURN THE THING BACK ON IF YOU TURN IT OFF. Had someone I worked with before that didn't turn theirs back on and when they got to their next stop the product was 60+ degrees and rejected. Driver fired immediately.

Not delivering a load at the proper temperature is definitely problematic. Delivering a load with the trailer not even on is serious negligence. If I were that careless in my job, I would expect to be fired.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, forgive me if I seem to ask questions rather than offer suggestions. It is a habit of mine to ask questions because I like for people to think about the choices and decisions they make when pursuing the trucking career. Sometimes a discussion about choices will bring out some interesting conversations that are helpful.

Could you explain to us why you prefer refrigerated freight? It might help some other newbies when they see your reasoning behind your choices.

Also, part of the reason I was curious about Kold Trans is because it is part of the Knight/Swift group of companies. I just thought it was odd that you had singled them out over the other companies in that group. But it makes sense if you just want to concentrate on reefer loads.

Old School, I like your reasoning. Nothing wrong with the approach of asking questions to get a person to come to conclusions rather than telling the person what to think. I don't know if I stated that all that well, but I hope the point is sufficiently made. I prefer refrigerated freight because long-term employability dictates that having experience hauling something other than dry van is beneficial. Also, refrigerated hauling typically pays a little better than dry van. Hauling refrigerated freight is a step up from dry van, but doesn't require any endorsements. Another reason that I prefer to start off with reefer is that it is easier to get longer runs versus dry van. On top of this reefer tends to run all 48, as compared to other load types which become a bit more regionalized. The last reasoning here is that refrigerated freight is typically 95+% no touch freight. On the question of considering Kold Trans but not Knight/Swift, it is partially because I want to run reefer. In addition to that, I would consider Swift, but before I completed CDL school, Swift said no on my background. Ok, so might ask, "if Swift said 'No,' then why would you expect a different response from a different company within the same corporation?" My only response would be that they do operate as different companies, so where one said "No" another might give me a chance. Also, I did put in an application with Knight in case other companies don't pan out.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Kerry, thanks for responding!

I like your reasons, and it is obvious you've been looking into this and studying to see what works best for you. I like that.

How are you with night driving and operating on erratic hours? That is part of trucking that may effect refer drivers more than others. I do a lot of unusual schedules as a flat bed driver, but I can tell you I see a lot of reefer drivers out here when I am running through the night. I do what I can to be efficient with my time, but I certainly see a lot of my reefer brothers out here at all times. Sometimes I will see them getting unloaded at some very unusual hours for most of us.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Kerry, thanks for responding!

I like your reasons, and it is obvious you've been looking into this and studying to see what works best for you. I like that.

How are you with night driving and operating on erratic hours? That is part of trucking that may effect refer drivers more than others. I do a lot of unusual schedules as a flat bed driver, but I can tell you I see a lot of reefer drivers out here when I am running through the night. I do what I can to be efficient with my time, but I certainly see a lot of my reefer brothers out here at all times. Sometimes I will see them getting unloaded at some very unusual hours for most of us.

There are various reasons that I have wanted to become an OTR driver, and among them is the fact that my sleep is often erratic and does not lend itself well to the typical predictable schedule job. I usually sleep 4-5 hours during a given 24-hour period. (Notice that I didn't say "4-5 hours per night.") Staying awake at night is a common practice for me. Truck driving is most definitely not something that works for everyone. There are some of us who just naturally live in ways that adapts pretty well to the demands of the lifestyle required.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I don't know much about our Temp Controlled division. I know they have a few trainers.

It is or will be possible to start out dry van and switch to refer.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Page 1 of 6 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

CDL Training Changing Careers Choosing A Trucking Company Company Sponsored CDL Training Refrigerated Truck Driving Orientation
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More